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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The former shop manager at the local BMW dealer told me he had a collection of almost 50 motorcycles. He'd bought them over many decades, usually when a customer wanted to trade in something unusual or unique at the various dealers he'd worked for over the years.

I asked him why he did that and then he went down a laundry list of his stable and explained he'd bought them for so little and were now worth much more. He had the land and metal barn to store them in and was a serious and knowledgeable collector. He also just plain loved motorcycles.

I don't know that I'd care to have that many bikes but wouldn't mind having a few more were it not for my budget and garage size. Some folks wouldn't dream of having more than one and as for me I'd like to add an adventure bike to the collection. I wouldn't mind having a collection of rare bikes. Also want to have one on static display in my home, seen a few depicted that way based on photos I've seen.

How about you? Would you add to what you have? Would you have one on display in your home?
 

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I've had more than one bike since 1980 (yes, I'm an old fart). I bought a used 1978 and the 1973 didn't sell so I just held onto it. Now of course, I'm real glad I did. Doesn't matter that it's not rare or was originally not expensive, that 1973 is a favorite. That's all that's important to me. The others in the barn are all different from each other. That's what I like. Again, none rare or collectable, just bikes I like. Well, one I'd like to sell but the market doesn't seem to be there right now.

Would I like to add to my stable. Of course I would. I've got a couple in mind and if the right deal came along at the right time I buy it. Life's too short to pass up a good opportunity!

As for having a bike on display in the house, no! If I'm going to own a bike, it's going to get ridden and that means it needs to be ready when the mood hits.
 

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Absolutely!!!

Especially when owning a Ducati and having to wait for parts/service etc..., it's almost a given you'll need a "back-up" bike. Are you new?

Own as many as you can.
 

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Different tools for different jobs. My 996S has such different characteristics to my Monster and visa versa. Though I'm getting the itch to do some long distance riding and a Mulit is looking like a near future purchase. Basically it's like shoes. Some for dress some are for sports and some are steel toed for kicking ass.
 
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I’d say if you have the resources, i.e. time, money and space to put them... why not. Whatever makes you happy and if it doesn’t infringe on anyone more power to you. I had seven Ducs in my three car garage, a very tight fit. The wife had to park her car in the driveway, she put up with it for a year and then told me in no uncertain terms some bikes had to go. I give her credit for putting up with it for that long. Now I’m down to two. And everybody’s happy.
 

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My bikes are usually well chosen for my needs. As such i tend to hang onto them until they reach a point that I'd rather hang onto them than sell them for a pittance.
 
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I love my little collection and enjoy them because they are all different (with the exception of the MH900e and the PS1000). I get different pleasure from each.

I'm building a new garage to house them more comfortably and have a type of man-lounge as part of it.

The down sides are:
- insurance
- maintenance - I like to keep them all road worthy (tires, belts, fluids, etc)
- sometimes I'm embarrassed by sheer unnecessary point of them all - worried that people judge.

Anyway - makes me happy.
 

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I have customers that have no interest in more than one bike at a time and others who ...... lets just say the wife knows nothing. I have had customers hide bikes at my shop for half a year before figuring out how to sneak a new one home. I do have more than a few who keep their bikes in the house especially during the off season so they can still enjoy them though they are not being ridden. Better than your average painting on the wall.

I do not collect bikes, they collect me. It seems as just when I decide I have just what I want something else shows up. For this very reason I tend to specialize in working only on bikes I know, I figure as long as I do not know that I need a new bike there is no issue. It is a occupational hazard having to road test bikes for this reason there is a short list of bikes I am working hard to not test ride.

And guys it is not just us. I have a lady customer with a 1100 monster who added a Honda Grom last fall, this year she bought a ktm duke and is thinking of also adding a Yamaha R3.
 

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I had seven bikes for a few years, all Ducatis. Not all of them were insured, there were two or three projects at any one time. Which leaves four or five to license/insure/maintain... and that got to be too much. I had bikes I did maintanence on and then didn't ride for literally years... to the point if I wanted to ride it I'd have to do maintanence again. One year my 996 cost me something like $400 per mile to ride. The fuel pump let go about two miles into my first ride that season and I never rode it again that year. I put new tires and belts on my 907 one winter and basically never rode it again. Years later I sold it with maybe 100 miles on the "new" parts which were now too old to trust. And I had to replace the fuel lines just to make it run to sell it.

So a couple years ago I started selling bikes off. I'm down to four now, two bevel single cylinder project bikes, a 1991 851, and a 2015 Monster 1200S.

In the past few weeks I've started jonsing really hard for a 959 Panigale. REALLY hard. I've been THIS CLOSE to heading off to the dealer for a closer look but the thing that stops me is, I don't want three bikes to insure/register/maintain. Well, the divorce would be expensive too but it's the insurance/registration that gets me.

Which leads me to track bikes. They don't need plates or insurance. So... I may exploe that route on my next bike. I'll probably sell at least one of my projects to make that happen though, IF it happens.

Which is a long way of saying I used to like having multiple bikes but the reality was even with four sitting there I'd generally only ride two of them with any regularity. Multiple times I'd head out to the garage intending to take out my 750GT or 996, but I'd see the Monster sitting there and hop in that instead. It is SO much easier to deal with in the real world.

If I were single I may have kept a couple of the old bikes just to look at, but they spent most of their time stuffed away in my basement, and what's the point in that? Plus their sales funded other toys so it wasn't a total loss.
 

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My business threw them out of the shop, which is the best environmentally. Still, along with my track and street vehicles, I have three bikes taking up space one of my friend's wife thinks he sold, so I'm at maximum density and I'm already violating zoning codes.

It depends upon the missions you choose to accept before the tape sizzles. I have 40 years of projects and hobbies sitting around and I'm 65. If I make it to 85 without dementia, I'll probably have 50 years of projects.

I have a buddy that is 71 but looks like 55. He worked for a great company and was single for about 20 years and worked all the double time, triple time and company perks and stock options. Lived in simple digs. His company got bought up by a bigger fish and his stock tripled. He retired with a pension and investments and for the last 20 years has build 2 classic cars a year, mostly muscle cars, mostly frame off restorations but he has customs too, and has never sold one. Massive multi building shop and does everything himself. I've painted a few cars in his booth and he's picky!!! He takes them to a few shows and then starts the next one. No motorcycle anymore though, wife draws the line. Last month he started a rat rod for her that she requested out of the blue. Her only instructions, "low and loud". I gave him some headlights from a 1923 Buick I had in the attic to help the project along.
 

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The wife was real sweet when I decided I couldn't live without a 999s on top of the ST4s. She's never complained about the "ponies" in the stable, as she calls it, and once in a while will climb on the back of the ST. I like riding both my bikes regularly, usually alternating every week during riding season, if I'm in town, and depending on which is up on its maintenance, most of which I do myself. They are so different, it is hard to express, but both speak to my needs.

A third? My concern for marital harmony—and my unwillingness to pay more in insurance—keeps my motorcycle lust under control. If I were a whole lot younger, I'd probably spring for some dual-sport bike, maybe a Yamaha WR450 or a Husky 701 or something. But truth be known, I don't have friends anymore who ride in the dirt, and I don't bounce as well as I used to when I was younger - so probably not. But that could be revisited at any time.

Cross country barcalounger? Not my style. I did some traveling up and down the East Coast with the ST4s, and it's fine for my needs. In a few years, we'll retire to the left coast and the ST will do fine, running between San Diego and Seattle when I need to.

Ron
 

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i think the op is talking about two different scenarios.

did the former shop manager ride all these bikes, or just park them in a shed. big difference to ongoing cost if you just park them with the intent of selling them as collectables in 30 or 40 years in the state they have deteriorated (or not) to.

if it's purely future investment, the question is - if, instead of buying each bike, he'd put that money into a bank account that was never withdrawn from, how much would it end up being worth when it came time to collect on the collectable, compared to the bikes? you'd be paying tax on the interest too.

otherwise, i say you need a couple of projects, as to some extent that is a given, and if you have some then you won't buy more. i have one registered, one to go back together, one that sits that i don't think i really ever want to ride again, a frame and a smashed up one that needs a frame. so two projects that if i didn't have them i've have two other similarly worthless piles of bits alleged to be usable motorcycles.
 

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I had 2 or mostly 3 bikes since 2004 until this year. Never carried full insurance, just liability, so that was not terribly expensive. But after a while the maintenance gets to be a bit much. I would rather ride than wrench. Shop time is expensive. Riding 6 or 8,000 miles a year, none of the 3 got worked out as much as I might like. Read that article by Nick I about emptying your garage and refilling it to re ignite the excitement. Light bulb. :grin2:

In August I sold the '07 Tuono without really trying, and that started the ball rolling. Sold the '98 VFR I had since '99 a month or so later, 82,000+ miles, most by me.

Took that money plus some cash and bought my 2014 monster 1200. :yeah:

Next up for sale the '03 Tuono, well loved and cared for, near new tires. Then there will be only 1. I'll see if I can live with that. Or maybe for how long. :laugh:
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
............. I'm down to four now, two bevel single cylinder project bikes, a 1991 851...........

These, amongst many others, that are worthy of static display in one's home. Someone else here stated that he rides ALL his bikes that he owns and I get that. It's just that for me a Ducati as well as other motorcycles I've seen are potential candidates for one's living room or man's cave. That doesn't mean that the bike in question can't be ridden from time to time, just that its form merits near full time attention......like that of a beautiful woman.

My first Ducati, a '92 907 IE in charcoal black, was purchased by a collector who put it on display in his veterinary practice's lobby. He later sent me a photo of the bike which made my heart swell with pride for reasons I'll post about later this winter in the Paso forum.

Let's face it, some bikes are meant to be ridden while some are meant to be ridden AND displayed AND ridden.
 

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I've had two bikes at two different times but for one reason or another one of them hasn't always worked out so I just stick with one.
 

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When I was younger I thought four would be the right number
Sporty bike
Comfortable bike
Dirt bike
Vintage bike

i can comfortably fit 6-8 bikes in my garage without having to park cars outside, and where I live insurance is cheap. So today I am working toward a few more.
One of each of the six generations of Ducati superbikes. 2 down, 4 to go
Dirt bike (again, probably something ending in EXC and two-stroke)
A couple of other vintage bikes.

One hard and fast rule I have is only to have one project at a time. VF1000R for now. A restored VFkR would just about pay for a nice 996 or 1098, knocking another generation of Duc off the list.
 

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I've had multiple bikes for years. Some are restorations that I've done others are riders that all have different functions. In the past I kept bikes in my office in my house as a display and for storage - they stayed there even if they were daily riders. Now I have a shop in the lower level of my house and the bikes stay there. I have 6 right now and soon it will be 7. I may sell one of the vintage bikes - I may not.

Yes maintenance is hard to keep up and costs to license and insure is stupid for that many bikes (I have had as many as 11 bikes ready to ride and all licensed and insured) My wife gets a little twisted once in a while but she gets over it and she gets how much I enjoy the hobby. We are working together on building a bike right now - its snowing outside and we've spent the last 2 days tearing down and cleaning an old triumph.

I will say that it gets almost impossible to ride them all and keep them in good condition - you must ride the bikes or they start to suffer.







 

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I've got 3 at the moment and like many here said, it takes plenty of space, time and money. If you have a wife, then it helps if she is very understanding or has a shoe fetish! All my bikes are modern sport classics, 2 ducs and 1 triumph. One thing that helps when owning multiple bikes is to know how to work on them yourself. I don't know how to do everything but I am constantly learning. I am lucky to have a basement that is big enough to house all of these bikes plus a few more in which I will be adding in the next few years. One more Modern Classic and hopefully a HyperMotard. I am in the process of turning the basement into a workshop/display area for my bikes. For as much as I like to ride them, when winter comes (snowed today in Atlanta, if you can believe that) it is nice to be able to look at them as well.
 

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I've had multiple bikes for years. Some are restorations that I've done others are riders that all have different functions. In the past I kept bikes in my office in my house as a display and for storage - they stayed there even if they were daily riders. Now I have a shop in the lower level of my house and the bikes stay there. I have 6 right now and soon it will be 7. I may sell one of the vintage bikes - I may not.
....







Is 6 what you tell the wife? By my count 9 different bikes are shown (looking great!) in the pics.
 
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