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One of my late winter projects (I'd call it a spring project but ole Man Winter refuses to leave), was to rebuild my rear brake caliper. Getting it off was a nightmare. The mounting bolts were seized and after stripping out the hex heads, vice grips stripped off the outsides, too. Ended up having to drill out the bolts to get it off. The brake had seized up on my a couple of times late last year while I was riding, so the whole assembly had gotten rather hot. I thought that the seized bolts were a result of the heat, but after getting the heads of the bolts off, the remaining bolts simply screwed out with my fingers.

So, did the heat cause these bolts to seize, and my beating on them was enough to loosen them up? Or were they just over torqued by the last guy who wrenched on the bike? What do you think?
 

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Heat makes bolts come loose not tighter so it must have been over tighten originally. Also since they came out easily once heads were removed they couldn't have been seized.
 

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I went through the exact thing on ST4. Hacksawing the heads off enough heat built up I was able to loosen them by hand. When I put in my new bolts I used anti seize and didn’t over tighten them.
 

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you can't over tighten them too much as it just rips the threads out of the bracket. they're pretty happy to fail.

it's amazing how much friction under a bolt head can lock something together. possibly due to them not using washers the load is over a smaller area and that impacts it? they don't lube under the heads either.
 

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My ST3 has the same issue.

KB02 - I know exactly what you are talking about, a few months ago I thought I'd take my rear caliper off to give things a good cleaning and inspection. But when I started to apply some grunt to the allen wrench I got that feeling things weren't going in a good direction. I could feel the wrench material starting to yield so I let up. Looking at bolt's internal pocket I could see it too was starting to round off. Total failure wasn't far off so I decided to leave well enough alone until I really needed to have the caliper off.
Looks like some hacksaw or dremel time is in my future. :frown2:
 

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While it may be too late for some of you (Janky59), I've had pretty good luck with aircraft grade EZ-grip. Put a drop of the suspension on the tool and the tiny ceramic particles interlock and fill the space between the tool and the fastener head. Really does reduce the tendency for the tool to slip and round out the fastener.
 

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A trick I've used many times is to give the head of the bolt a really good hard wack with a hammer, this has an amazing effect on loosening stubborn bolts.
With Allen or torx socket head bolts I use the Allen head socket and an extension bar and hit that in.
 

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A trick I've used many times is to give the head of the bolt a really good hard wack with a hammer, this has an amazing effect on loosening stubborn bolts.
With Allen or torx socket head bolts I use the Allen head socket and an extension bar and hit that in.
Sounds about right. BFH is whatcha just need sometimes...
 
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