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Discussion Starter #1
First post other than “introductions”.

A friend asked me to get a 1997 750SS back onto the road since it’s been in storage since 1998. It has only 1,500km on the clock and hasn’t had its first service yet. Was delivered to my house on Saturday afternoon….



Monday.

First problem was to open the fuel cap, a little WD40 and a lot of patience solved that problem, look what I found.



Tank removed and found the plastic nut holding the fuel level sensor has deteriorated into two separate parts. Firstly I will try an Araldite repair, if that fails I figure its money required for a new item.



Have cleaned the tank out, holy shit, where did all of that come from?



Question,
Where do the wires from the fuel sensor entering tank in the second last photo go to?



Next installment, in a day or two. Answer my questions and watch this space.
 

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...you can get an alloy replacement nut for your fuel level sensor from california cycleworks ....if your repair job doesnt work. i believe ducati only sells the entire sensor as a complete unit ($$$$$)
 

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This is the wiring diagram that is titled as 91 - 96, but I expect it will be 97 as well.

Joe-B is correct. There are 4 wires - 2 to the fuel level sensor and 2 to the fuel pump.

Repairing the plastic nut - as you are in Oz, there is a product here branded Q bond. Go to Repco and ask for it, it may not be on the shelf. It is a bonding kit that contains product for grey and black plastic and one of these (grey option in the kit?) is good for metal. Plastics are difficult to bond and (shoot me down) but Araldite is not the solution. The kit costs about AUD$40 and goes a very long way. I have 3 bikes that grace the product plus a few jobs around home and still only used about 30% of the grey part.

I don't remember why now, but I have a full, multi-lingual workshop manual for the 750/900 91-96 on my computer, which i can upload to a web site for downloading - just need your email address to give you permission to download (after I upload)

If it was in my possession I would do the following.
Buy a new battery and charge it properly - be patient!
Get/squirt some oil into the rocker covers and a tiny bit into the cylinders via the spark plug hole - then let it sit for an hour or so.
Drain and clean the carbs to get rid of old fuel/gum or use an additive that purports to clean carbs and fuel lines.
Make sure the floats are not stuck.
Crank the engine a few times to get oil moving around the moving parts then leave for a while for oil to spread.
Then start and run the engine until hot, then dump and replace oil.

Then ride and enjoy.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Joe-B, dancinkozmo and Punch, thanks for the comments. All appreciated and noted. Hopefully I will get back to it today if I can sidestep my wife's job list. Will post updates. The owner isn't pushing, in fact his plan is to have it ready to ride down to P.I. for Moto GP.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks Indy36, bookmarked.
And a big thanks to Punch for the help given in a couple of PM's.

Good progress today, air box off, carbs blown out, cables freed up, all back together. Clean oil into cylinders, an old battery connected and motor turns over freely. Clutch freed up. Looking forward to the owner bringing new battery, oil and filter over this weekend.
 

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Start budgeting - if you ride it, you will become addicted!
 

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Hi,

Gas, when it decays it turns into a varnish, pretty nasty stuff... I can tell you that if your tank looks that bad, your carbs are going to look just as bad or worse. You will probably need to dip them. See if a local dealership has a "Dip" tank for carbs. If you remove them yourself the shop should not charge you much for putting them in the tank. Or you could pick up a wire brush and about 10 cans of carb cleaner... and a compressor will be usefull too (to blow out all the passages)

Good luck (really a great looking bike you have there :D )

Gray :think:
 

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Discussion Starter #11
After my last optimistic post I went back to the garage and it all went down hill:(
The battery, oil and filter turned up. Fresh fuel, new battery, the cranking made the oil pressure light go out so that is good but no start. Yes I have a good blue spark. No fuel to carbs, took fuel line off at the remote fuel tap under the tank nothing coming out. I think maybe because it is pumped I had better push starter button with the fuel line off, still no fuel. Remove filler cap and have a good look in with torch, I see a filter and lots of pipes.
I am thinking when I had the fuel sensor out from the bottom there is a chance that I may have pulled the wires off the pump? When the ignition is turned on can you hear the pump run?
The rubbish in the tank may have clogged the fuel filter?
Any other suggestions please.
With the fuel cap off I can see a ring of very small grub screws around the alloy casting. Do I loosen or remove them, then how do I remove the alloy casting, lever, screw out?
Suggestions please. HELP HELP HELP.
 

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Hi,

yes when you turn the ignition on you should here the pump running. I would suggest you replace the filter, pop the pump out, pop the sensor out... and plug it all in (out side the tank) then turn the igniton on... it should run, if not the pump has also "bit the dust"... have you drained the carbs? With the tank looking that bad I would assume the carbs are pretty gummed up too...

Gray:think:
 

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+1 on pulling the float bowls. It's a PITA because you have to pull the carbs off of the bike, but the jets could be completely blocked, the float stuck, and the needle stuck to the emulsion tube. Have a hand impact driver handy for the float bowl screws, they are tough to remove and easy to mangle Phillips head screws. :(
-DucMad
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Thanks again for all comments.
How do you remove the top of tank "thingo" to get into the pump, I took the flip up cap off. This exposed a ring of very small grub screws screwing horizontally around the alloy "thingo" (what is it called?). Do I loosen the grub screws or remove them? Then how do you get it off the tank, lever, screw out, I don't want to stuff up at this point and scratch an unmarked tank. I will now go and look at the online manual that was posted (thanks) but personal experience is very valuable so I will be checking for comments as the day unfolds.
 

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losen the grub screws ( we say Madenschrauben ) will be enough,
as only their tips screw into the tank. But you can pull them out
never the less, and have them put away in a safe place while you
are working on the tank.
it has been some time since, but if i remember correctly, you simply
pull out the aluminum ring from the tank by force, getting it back in
should be the tougher part then.

:)
 

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losen the grub screws ( we say Madenschrauben ) will be enough,
as only their tips screw into the tank. But you can pull them out
never the less, and have them put away in a safe place while you
are working on the tank.
it has been some time since, but if i remember correctly, you simply
pull out the aluminum ring from the tank by force, getting it back in
should be the tougher part then.

:)
Do as Muschi says about the screws. I take them right out so I know where they are. Getting the cap out can be a bit of a challenge as the O ring inside sticks to the tank. I use a round piece of wood through the hole and work around easing it a little at a time until the seal breaks.

Getting it back in is an even bigger challenge if it is the same as 99+, which I expect it is. Don't try to instal the filler cap and top rubber ring at the same time unless you wish to practice every swear word you know and then still probably fail.

Insert the cap until it is almost home with enough room for the ring to fit in. Make sure the cap is lined up correctly as it won't rotate after being inserted. Then put the ring over it and in place, then push it home or persuade it with a rubber mallet or hammer and wood. Refit grub screws.
 

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Hi,

A good tip for working with o-rings and fuel lines is use some silicon spray. Silicon won't attack the rubber and is an excellent lubricant. :D
I did not have any problems changing the fuel filer on my 2000 750ss ... (though it was new at the time, so the rings did not have a chance to harden and stick) hardest part for me was finding all the "grub screws"... Take your time and check twice make sure all the screws are out before you start tugging on the cap.

Gray:think:
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Finally found time to dig a bit further into the tank, not good.
After the pile of crud came out the other day I still found this.





Before I disassembled it I couldn’t hear the pump run when the ignition was turned on. Today I put 12v DC across the pump and it didn’t spin up. I checked continuity across the pump and have a circuit. My guess is the pump is gummed up and can’t get off the mark. If it was disassembled and freed up it may be OK. What do you think? I know it’s isn’t built to pull apart but given that (I think) it has failed we don’t have anything to loose other than time

 

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Hi,

wow :eek: .... that is going to take alot of work to clean up... Before you can use that tank again it will need to be "spotless" clean. Toss the pump and look for a new one on evilbay. You can also use one from a car, but I am not sure which one. I am sure one of the guys will chime in with the info ;). As for your carbs.... you really need to pull them off and clean them out too...

Gray :think:
 
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