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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anyone with a late 1970s era 860 or 900 ever mount an oil pressure gauge on the bike? Where did you install the take off line to get reliable oil pressure reading? What gauge did you use?

(Let me save some of my friends some time. This is not about whether it's a good idea, or useless, or what you would do if you were me, or whether a gauge will prevent me from blowing up the engine. Those are great questions. They are not my questions. Aloha)
 

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I think that you are wasting your time. Engines like the Ducati Singles and twins have no plain bearings, just ball and roller bearings, so there is no way that they ever build oil pressure, the oil is free to run through the bearings, keeping them cool and lubricated. An engine with plain bearings has a different method, where the bearings need pressure so that they float on a film of oil and metal-to-metal contact is prevented, so a pressure gauge is essential.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
That's interesting. What I took away from Falloon's Ducati book ( as well as tech papers by people like Kevin Bracken and Jim Woods on building old Duc race motors) is that the roller bearing engines of that era ran 25 psi warm at revs (up to 80 psi in racing versions) and idled warm at around 10 psi. That's between 9 and 20 litres a minute oil flow. Wouldn't that be monitorable by an external oil pressure gauge? Hailwood's backup 860 NCR Corsa bike has an oil pressure gauge fitted next to the tach, which is where I got the idea.
 

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Anything is possible I suppose, but Mototrans fitted a pressure gauge to their late single cylinder engines, but it was a waste of time apparently as the warning light only worked when the engine was cold.
 
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