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Discussion Starter #1
Never thought I would be asking questions about an oil drain plug but here we go.

First, if any of this has already been posted, feel free to share the link but I haven't been able to find anything on here about it.

I have seen contradictory information regarding the type of wrench needed to take off the plug. When I used a 10mm allen, it seemed to fit but not snugly. However, after seeing that some have had to use a chisel to take it off, I decided to take my chances with the 10. I had to pull out a breaker bar but it came off.

This is where my main question comes in. After looking up replacement oil drain plugs, I have found a variety of possible replacements but wanted to check in with the community first before buying. Does anyone have any middle-of-the-road replacements they wanna share?

Finally, as a side note given I am new to the world of Ducs, what is the difference between the 750 Sport and the 750SS? Are parts interchangeable between the two?
 

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there has been 3 750 sports.

1972 - 78 bevel drive

1988 - 1990 carby.

2001 - 2002 low budget 750ssie.
 

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The 750 Sport had a spring valve engine whereas the 750SS was a desmo. Only approx. 200 750SS were made (probably less) to homologate them ex post facto after Paul Smart's superbike win in the 70's. The SS had some minor frame differences also but I am no expert on them. The SS's are now worth a fortune and, as a result, there are many fakes with the unscrupulous using Sports dolled up as an SS.

Part of the issue with the drain plugs on the bevels is using the wrong crush washer. Never use an alum crush washer on these as they don't really crush. You should use the copper ones and, preferably, the hollow copper washers sold by Bel Metrics. The solid washers work OK but the once and done hollow jobs are better. The other issue with the DP's is overtightening as usual. That's why the hollow washers are better - tighten the plug to only enough to crush the washer and that is it, you're done.
A good 10mm Allen should do the job but make sure it is fully seated within the plug for either tightening or loosening. Not doing this properly will wear out the plug causing the play you noted.
 

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The drain plugs are cast with the 10mm recess in them,due to that the hole isn't a really good fit for a 10mm allen wrench. The previous advice is good. Make sure the wrench is fully seated when you go to break it loose and don't over tighten it on re assembly, with a new crush washer [aluminum washers are single use] a tad over snug is all that is needed. A drain bolt with a hex is OK unless you jump curbs or drag the sump on things.
 

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I've had good luck with Aircraft EZ-Grip fastener friction drops. You place a drop of this suspension on your tool or fastener and the micro ceramic particles interlock and fill voids between the surface of the fastener and the tool. The wrench/screwdriver/Allen key won't slip. Amazing stuff.
 

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Finally, as a side note given I am new to the world of Ducs, what is the difference between the 750 Sport and the 750SS? Are parts interchangeable between the two?
As you have a 2002, nothing much is different between them. The 2000s model 750s share most parts with both the Monsters of that era as well as the other Super Sports.

There is a definite beginning and end to what years interchange and honestly, I'm not savvy enough about them to give you reliable information on the interchange. Also, the forks will differ between them slightly. Adjustable vs non, Showa versus Marzocchi etc.

There is a thread that is stickied in the Super Sports section that has some details on what works with part numbers etc. You may find some helpful information there. Also, there is good information located in the technical discussion forums.

If I could offer one bit of advice, get a Haynes manual. I have both the factory one, and the Haynes. The Haynes is more my go to manual. There is some stuff in the factory manual that is not as clear as in the Haynes and vice versa.

The factory manual refers to tools by their Ducati part number which can be confusing. The Haynes just tells you to get whatever tool you need. If the tool is a special one, the Haynes will tell you how to make it.

As for your drain plug, it was probably gorilla'd on by the PO or where ever the PO had it serviced. When I got my 996, it took a 1/2" drive, 18" long breaker bar to get the drain plug loose. ....sean
 

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it's the same as a 1998 - 2002 750ssie. except for the stuff that is different.

sump plug torque is 43nm. new washer each time. the fit of the 10mm hex piece is always a bit loose. i often tap them in if it's a bit dodgy, as you can often get some fresh hex at the bottom of the hole.
 

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My '92 came with a wrench in the toolkit for the drain plug. I don't know why, but this always seemed to fit better than standard hex socket.
 

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I have seen aftermarkets that sealed with a o-ring and did not like them, too many leaks.

Aftermarket male hex to use a common wrench, did not see a benefit and prefer a more flush drain on the bottom of the motor.

The brass drain plug (oem 10mm) is like a fuse as you are more likely to round out the allen than strip out the case threads that would be a issue to fix. As mentioned simply make sure you have a good sharp 10mm and seat it fully in the drain plug and you should have no issues if you torque the drain plug. Do it right and the drain plug never wears out, do it wrong and you may need a new one.
 

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on sport vs supersport

IIRC
swingarm -steel vs aluminum
forks -showa vs marzzocci (both non-adjustable)
paint - no clearcoat on paint
handlebars-one piece steel on sport
front brake- 1 rotor ....maybe?

everything else is the same and these bbikes are lego bikes meaning you can swap almost all parts easily between the supersports of the same generation. Ie: a 900 motor can fit a 750 frame as does all suspension chassis parts.
 

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If I could offer one bit of advice, get a Haynes manual. I have both the factory one, and the Haynes.
Definitely! I also have both and the Haynes is much easier to work with. It’s in one language, it has useful pictures and the tool tips are also very good.
 
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Sometimes on a loose fit hex key you can snug it up by wrapping it in aluminum foil. I have also taken a SAE hex key and ground down each flat for a custom snug fit. Once you make one it will last you forever.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Thanks for all the responses so far. Never thought a thread on the oil drain plug would be so chatty haha. I have purchased the EZ grip, mostly due to all the other uses I could also have for it, and have also purchased the recommended plug. I am keeping the original plug even though it does appear that someone used a 9 allen wrench on it previously which mostly explains the poor fit.
 
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