Ducati.ms - The Ultimate Ducati Forum banner

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Getting my 2006 999 ready for my first CMRA race down here in Texas. One of the tech requirements is safety wiring the oil cooler lines. I've done some wacky drilling getting the bike ready, but I just can't see how to drill the oil line bolts without damaging something.

Can anyone describe how they accomplished this? Pictures would be great.

Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
642 Posts
I had somebody prep the oil lines so I could run a race school on my Paul Smart. The drill location is probably not ideal, but trying to get safety wire pliers in there probably had something to do with it.

I don't know how hard these fittings are but I have certainly broken a lot of 1/16" cobalt drill bits in my time drilling bolts.
 

Attachments

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
8,211 Posts
I´ve never heard of a series that require drilling those..

You could maybe pass inspection doing what Tye suggests. Another option is to get 2 small hose-clamps and tighten them around the nuts, then attach the safetywire to the hoseclamp instead. That passes inspection on the oilfilter, so it should work.

Sort of like this (swedish forum site, but pics in the thread)
http://www.sporthoj.com/forum/showthread.php?t=106605

//amullo
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
I like the hose clamp idea. We have to do the same for the oil filter. I'll give it a try - thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
274 Posts
As said before just take some silicone and put a line along the oil cooler line connection and you will pass inspection with no problems.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
724 Posts
I had somebody prep the oil lines so I could run a race school on my Paul Smart. The drill location is probably not ideal, but trying to get safety wire pliers in there probably had something to do with it.

I don't know how hard these fittings are but I have certainly broken a lot of 1/16" cobalt drill bits in my time drilling bolts.
Hate to critique but the safety wire on the top nut is doing nothing to keep that nut from loosening up if it had a mind to (unless it's a LH thread). Actually may help loosen it the way it is. But that is the way the nut should be drilled, usually @ 2 positions 180 degrees from the other so you don't have to wrap the wire completely around the nut.

What is silicon going to do??? Won’t stop any oil from coming out under pressure or otherwise. Isn’t the idea to keep the fasteners tight?
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
11,256 Posts
What is silicon going to do??? Won’t stop any oil from coming out under pressure or otherwise. Isn’t the idea to keep the fasteners tight?
Silicone is used in place of safety wire in a lot of situations. For example; the drain plug on the cooling system located on the water pump housing.

I kinda like the clamp idea actually, I might use that in the future myself.



100% free webcam site! | Awesome chicks and it is absolutely free! | Watch free live sex cam - easy as 1-2-3
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
762 Posts
I did the same as bpracer. I honestly think i took the rule book to seriously. or maybe not. who knows , but i doubt the tech inspector whould even know that half of the lines and plugs on my bike were cooling or oil lines. Looking back , i think it really comes down to ' Safety ". I would safety wire every bolt on my bike to ensure it didn't fall off , if I could. especially at our level. I don't have a personal mechanic. I most of my work, and sometimes i can be a bit of a space cadet. of course the chances of my temp sensors actually backing out are probably slim.

think it boils down to translation !!!
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
642 Posts
Hate to critique but the safety wire on the top nut is doing nothing to keep that nut from loosening up if it had a mind to (unless it's a LH thread). Actually may help loosen it the way it is. But that is the way the nut should be drilled, usually @ 2 positions 180 degrees from the other so you don't have to wrap the wire completely around the nut.

What is silicon going to do??? Won’t stop any oil from coming out under pressure or otherwise. Isn’t the idea to keep the fasteners tight?
Yeah, I know, it's not quite as bad as it looks it real life. The upper line wouldn't be loosened, but it is not really going to help much either. That was the reason for my "not ideal" comment. I never looked at how the lower lines were drilled until I took the picture and had the same initial reaction. The upper lines are the only ones I have had off and re-wired after draining the oil in the cooler. I'll have to fix this at some point to get a better angle.

I can't see how silicone would help either (even if it allows you to pass tech). Nothing will help if things weren't tightened properly to begin with.

I actually put anti seize on the threads a AN fittings so the they won't gall; so they can actually be torqued properly (not a big deal on bike stuff, but try AN-12 or AN-16 fittings some time!); and still be re-usable. The threads are not the sealing surface unless you're using pipe thread fittings, but I digress.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
11,256 Posts
I did the same as bpracer. I honestly think i took the rule book to seriously. or maybe not. who knows.
Yea, I mean thats pretty amazing work there, craftsmanship! I agree, its totally over-kill, but hey if you don't pull your bike apart every weekend, why not right? ;)

Though I happened to notice, your high pressure oil line in the bottom left of the pix, which is one of the most critical lines on the bike, was not wired. :abduct:



100% free webcam site! | Awesome chicks and it is absolutely free! | Watch free live sex cam - easy as 1-2-3
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
11,256 Posts
thats what i mean , what makes any pressure oil line more important than another, if your gonna do 1 might as well do em' all. oil loss any where ain't good, i had to take a second look , and i'll look again tomorrow . isn't that a fuel line !!!!!:D
LOL :rolleyes:

Yea, you can go ballistic! Shit, I wanna glue the fuel lines to the tank! ;)

But in all honesty, there really isn't any reason to safety wire that stuff. Wanna know why the force you to safety wire anything? Because believe it or not, it forces you to double check everything before you hit the track. Its a great tactic, but if your smart and you dismantle your bike after every race (which is what's recommended) then you'll re-tighten everything automatically.

I strip my bike down once a month... I normally do valve checks, fluid flushes, the works. When you're doing THAT much maintenance, its easy to make sure things are tight. Best thing to do is make a check-list, get a decent small torq wrench and go through the entire bike, well before the race weekend. You should never have a bike failure...



100% free webcam site! | Awesome chicks and it is absolutely free! | Watch free live sex cam - easy as 1-2-3
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
8,211 Posts
I even have some stuff safetywired on my ROADbike.. Like Oil -filter -drainplug and -fill plug aswell as the front brake caliper mounting bolts.

Why? Because i want the extra safety. I also run the coolant as water and waterwetter.

//amullo
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
724 Posts
Actually the more you mess with something the better chance you’ll eventually miss something or even wear a fastener or thread out depending on what it is. Not saying ignoring or not touching it will result in something better.

If a line or bolt didn’t quite get the proper torque for whatever reason, safety wire will stop it from coming loose from vibration or completely coming undone if wired properly. The photos in that “Safety Wire” link shows over 95+% of those safety wired wrong and might as well be left off, but some will stop the fastener from falling off completely but do nothing to keep it tight. The only one that was correct is the very last concept drawing.

http://www.auf.asn.au/scratchbuilder/safetying.html#procedure

Not everything on aircraft have safety wire on them, just the MOST critical. Fuel lines aren’t necessarily safety wired, but usually have some sort of safety built into the design, but not always. Some have the actual fuel transfer line inside another larger line which seals any leak if it happens. Other lines (oil and such) are just AN fittings expected to be tightened and leak checked before released. If there is a fitting that has a minor imperfection and leaks or weeps, the use of a conical seal on the sealing face may work and is acceptable. If that doesn't work it may cause the replacment of a very expensive or time consuming repair - for good reason.

The use of silicone sounds like wishful thinking….:confused:.. I’d strive for something more secure myself.. It shouldn’t be just about passing tech, it’s your ass and safety should be top priority, not just something you “Have“ to do..-- I guess that comes from my aircraft days and can’t shake that way of thinking…. Boils down to if your going to do it why not do it right?!. :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
For those interested - I globbed a bit of silicon on the oil line nuts and passed tech no problem. Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
In the defense of the organization I raced with, I think they are mostly interested in confirming that you have gone through all the most critical parts of your bike and checked that everything is bolted on and tight. Silicon is clearly not the best solution, but it does show the tech inspector that I've checked and tightened those bolts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
724 Posts
In the defense of the organization I raced with, I think they are mostly interested in confirming that you have gone through all the most critical parts of your bike and checked that everything is bolted on and tight. Silicon is clearly not the best solution, but it does show the tech inspector that I've checked and tightened those bolts.
Just wondering how this verifies the nuts were tightened? Because you took the time to apply silicone over it, something that hides it because if it's not there you won't pass tech? Actually it may even cover a weep that would normally be seen BEFORE it became more then just a weep. Even if it "Looks" tight, until you put a wrench to it.....I've seen leaking lines safetied that are loose. Silicone won't even let you see it. It's messy, and not effective under pressure unless it's sealing to mating parts like 2 halves of a case or similar. It has it's place to be sure.

I'm not trying to ruffle anyone's feathers -- I just can't see the actual value in the practice is all.... :confused: I do understand the intent.. as weak as it really is...
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top