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Discussion Starter #1
Who has this done on their Ohlin's clad SuperBike?

How much are we looking at to have it done?

I'm guessing that NCRick is a great source, but being that I'm not going to have it done any time soon, I'm also not interested in pestering him about it right now.

I'm more interested in learning a bit about it now.:D
 

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Here is the skinny on suspension.

YES, you can send it out, get it done and go ride. But thats not the proper way to do it. What you need is someone local to you IE: someone who you can visit at the track. This way they can see and measure the bike before hand, set the valving up properly and get it back on the bike. Suspension is really an art and without the suspension expert being able to see and touch your bike, they can only guess at what to do. I just went down the road your about to trek and highly suggest hitting up a track day and seeing the local suspension guy, before doing anything.

Ohh and in terms of what will need to be done: Valving, spring and seals on the forks, shim stack and seals on the shock. It will probably cost $500 - $700 bux.



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Hey JDuc, If you ever attend a RideSmart trackday, the suspension guy Roger can do Ohlins pretty well. He has decent rates, too.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Yes, I am aware of OROR. Actually, they've set up the suspension on both of our bikes: the 900SS and the S4R before it was totaled.

I don't ride with RideSmart due to some issues I've had with the owner in the past. However, provided this bike get's here before the 14th, I will be making the trek out to Eagles Canyon for the track day out there since I have a half off day with Ride Smart in my pocket...I just have a hard time giving RideSmart ANY of my money....but that's another thread in and of its self.

I was actually planning on having the OROR guys do the work when it came time. Again, provided the bike is here in time, I'm planning on seeing if they will be at the track Friday night before the event on the 14th to see if I can drop it off with them and let them change the oil, etc. before the track day.

My other question...I'm gathering that this bike from the factory is sprung for a 155-165 lb, rider. Do they even make springs for lighter weight riders? If not, then would the SBK revalve potentially be lower or does that prive that I keep seeing even involve respringing the bike for a given weight? If it does, is there a difference between the SBK spring conversion and the stock Ohlins springs?

On my SS they came with progressive springs, I'm going to assume on these bikes they're not progressive, wouldn't make any sense for them to be.

Thanks in advance for any info.
 

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Sorry to hear about your issues with RideSmart/Dave. He's a good guy, if not a little flaky at times. Even if the event was a little disorganized at times, RS always had dates that fit my schedule and the rates were good. In any case, I don't think Dave gets any $$ from Roger or OROR.

How much you weigh?... Most, if not all of the Ohlins SBK's came sprung with .95kg fork springs which is about right for 160-180lb riders. The rear has different OEM rates depending on which model your talking about.
 

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The 749R is a strange beast... since the two of you haven't received them yet, here is a tid-bit of more info!

The rear end is NOT like any other. The shock actually is special, it has a limited travel. The rear link is special, it makes the shock assembly linear instead of progressive. Henceforth, the natural spring rate on the bike is a 120, for a 155 - 165lb rider stock. If your lighter then 155 with all your gear on, you could go down to a 110, but it might end up being too light. You're gonna be shocked how different the rear end is, its really only setup for racing, its got very little travel. Even with the pre-load adjuster all the way out, its still VERY stiff.

Again, one more thing that makes the 749R unique and more for the track...



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Tye, what kind of sag numbers you running on that thing.. you got the stock Ohlins, or the triple adjustable. I was aware of the difference in suspension, but was trying to research the base setup info. Seems like the old Section8 info is no longer cached on the net and I gave all my setup info to the guy who bought my 749, unfortunaltely I also had a bunch of 749R notes on there too, from conversations with Jason Etter and other 749 racers, so now I'm starting from scratch.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
The 749R is a strange beast... since the two of you haven't received them yet, here is a tid-bit of more info!

The rear end is NOT like any other. The shock actually is special, it has a limited travel. The rear link is special, it makes the shock assembly linear instead of progressive. Henceforth, the natural spring rate on the bike is a 120, for a 155 - 165lb rider stock. If your lighter then 155 with all your gear on, you could go down to a 110, but it might end up being too light. You're gonna be shocked how different the rear end is, its really only setup for racing, its got very little travel. Even with the pre-load adjuster all the way out, its still VERY stiff.

Again, one more thing that makes the 749R unique and more for the track...
I've been reading up on the linear linkage on the 749R and am quite excited about it to say the least.

That's why I'm wondering about leaving the springs as they are. From looking at the spring rate chart from the now extinct Section 8 page, I see the rear is set up for a 155-165 lb rider. Which leads me to believe the front is too. I'm at 145 right now. With gear, I'm likely right at 155 - 160 ish, but I'm also losing weight (go me!).

That's why I'm wondering if a typical SBK revalve also tends to include a respring as well...and thus the typical price I'm seeing of $600-800 might actually be less for me...OR if the respring is to a better spring AS WELL as a spring more suited towards the riders weight.

I'm aware that OROR doesn't make a dime off of the RS track days. Thus the reason I don't have a single problem giving him the money and why I've already given him a couple hundred bucks of mine to do further work on my 900SS front end beyond just a basic set-up like he does for $30 @ the track days.

Being that Austin is only a couple of hours from us here in Dallas, I'd actually take the bike to him before I'd give money to Ride Smart, but fortunatelly I am all too aware of the benefit of riding then providing feedback then having adjustments made then riding, etc. etc.

Bella749 - the 749R already has the adjustable tripple on it, so chances are tye hasn't changed that out and already has teh adjustable tripple. According to his page he already has the SBK revalve done front & rear.
 

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I'm not a huge fan of the 749R's rear end... I've never raced a 749R without the link and that bloody shock, but I don't like it. What it does is basically give you less squat. But the moment I stuck a Ducati Corse 999RS shock on it, the bike totally changed personality and I liked it MUCH better. Sadly, according to Dan Kyle, you can't use anything else but the short travel shock due to the link which is used. Evidently the corse bikes are more adjustable, hence the reason why the corse shock was a long travel one.

If your 155-160 with gear, the stock spring is fine.

Preload/sag isn't as important on the shock, there is actually a mark on the threads where the preload adjuster sits to be in the (normal) position. Just put it where it belongs (in the center 140mm) and leave it be. Again, its not as adjustable as I'd like it to be, but it does work.

Per another member here's recommendation, I set my front end up to the 30mm offset. This caused a whole bunch of problems with the bike's setup. First off, the front was too tall, so you'd wanna raise the rear right? Nope, the moment you do that, the bike was totally unstable. So I had to sand down the fairings a bit where the tire would hit under braking, just to bring down the front by 1 ring. That resolved a whole host of issues related to front stability. Then I had the forks re-built again and changed the oil with something a bit more for the tracks I ride at. It worked much better with the new oil. My forks also have the SBK kit and are valved for my weight/track conditions: IE; When setup properly for riding conditions, the adjustments are all pretty much in the center; preload, compression, rebound.



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