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Discussion Starter #81
Full Spectrum: If you’ve been following my posts or those of others on this subject, you surely realize by now that I am not alone, there are many people with this bike who have the same issue. I have no idea why your forks were soft and yet mine (and others )are hard, but I do know it’s nothing I did. Although I may end up sending the forks to someone, it will be after I’ve decided I can’t fix them. I own quite a few bikes myself, but I probably wouldn’t own any if I felt I was unqualified to fix them myself.
 

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Full Spectrum: If you’ve been following my posts or those of others on this subject, you surely realize by now that I am not alone, there are many people with this bike who have the same issue. I have no idea why your forks were soft and yet mine (and others )are hard, but I do know it’s nothing I did. Although I may end up sending the forks to someone, it will be after I’ve decided I can’t fix them. I own quite a few bikes myself, but I probably wouldn’t own any if I felt I was unqualified to fix them myself.
Well put. You're squarely aligned on positive forward steps.
 

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Full Spectrum: If you’ve been following my posts or those of others on this subject, you surely realize by now that I am not alone, there are many people with this bike who have the same issue. I have no idea why your forks were soft and yet mine (and others )are hard, but I do know it’s nothing I did. Although I may end up sending the forks to someone, it will be after I’ve decided I can’t fix them. I own quite a few bikes myself, but I probably wouldn’t own any if I felt I was unqualified to fix them myself.
Ok, great. I was just offering my opinion, and trying to be helpful.
Ive written posts here over the last 20 years about these bikes and their suspension issues, in addition to owning a bunch of them.

Hopefully you get this sorted out.
 

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Discussion Starter #84
I appreciate your input, Full Spectrum. I’m just confused as to why your forks functioned so much differently than mine. Looking back on bike tests no one complained about the forks. This may have a lot to do with the condition of the roads where I live compared to those you ride on. I didn’t notice them being overly harsh when in Florida, only in Michigan. As I said, others have had the same issues, it’s not just my forks. When I figure out what’s wrong, even if it’s something I did, it will benefit quite a few S4RS owners.
 

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Discussion Starter #85
Summing up some things I’ve learned here:
1) My forks were really clean inside when I disassembled them. Others have pointed out that theirs were very dirty inside. Does this mean someone serviced mine , and maybe modified something, prior to me ? Possibly.

2) The change to an oil with a CST of 17, vs what was in the forks before ( should have been Cst 19 Ohlins) made a small difference for the better. The problem here is I’m not positive it was the stock oil. At any rate I can now compare any change in oil to my baseline. I am replacing with Cst 10.4 fluid over the winter . This should soften up the damping throughout the range.

3) The only issue I had upon reassembly was that I followed the video for the fluid height and it must have been for a different Ohlins fork. My level was too high, but thanks to Belter I corrected this before installation. I’m going to research fluid level before changing fluid again. I might lower it more. The spring installation was also different than mine, but mine would only install one way, so I couldn’t install them incorrectly . I did try though. I thought this might be part of the problem and someone previously assembled them incorrectly. Apparently the location of the spring spacer differs between models. I don’t see how the location of the spacer would affect correct function of the forks anyway. Above the springs or below, a spacer is a spacer.

4) I am going to retorque the triple tree bolts that hold the legs secure, just in case I did not use the correct torque and are pinching the tubes. It’s possible.

5) I removed and cleaned the damping adjusters in the bottom of the legs, also the passages. Mine didn’t “click” as you adjusted them. They do after cleaning. There is a spring in there that needs to move freely.
 

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Discussion Starter #86
The Redline fork fluid came in the mail. It is full synthetic, I wasn’t sure. I would think a full synthetic might reduce stiction a bit.
 

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I will add to post #63. In my experience the type of fork oil has little or no effect on stiction, as long as it’s fresh. Most of the stiction comes from the seals. Here a good seal grease like Racetech sells does make a noticeable difference. Problem is it doesn’t last very long.



I will have to agree with Full_Spectrum in that the couple of S4RS’s I’ve ridden the forks were relatively soft with minimal stiction. Very fluid and responsive as compared with the grossly rigid and harsh Showa’s that came on my S2R1000.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
 

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Discussion Starter #88
Yes, I used anti stiction grease when I assembled my forks. You’re right though, it won’t last long. My thoughts on the synthetic lube was based on synth motor oil and how you shouldn’t use it during break in because it’s too slick and won’t allow your rings to seat. At any rate, it’s all I could find in stock with the CST I wanted to try. Can’t hurt, might help.
 
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