Ducati.ms - The Ultimate Ducati Forum banner
  • Hey Everyone! Enter your bike HERE to be a part of this months Bike of the Month Challenge!

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
421 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I,ve read here that Ohlins shocks were fitted as standardd on 2002 900ss, and 2003-2006 1000ss DS.

Is this the same Ohlins shock that everyone here seems to recommend for the Carbie 900's? (Ducati 46 PRCL, part number DU 235)

If so can I just grab one of these from the wreckers, check it and fit it?

Is the spring from my currently fitted OE standard shock the same rate as the later OE Ohlins shocks?

Is my OE spring interchangeable with the later ohlins spring?

Thanks in advance for the help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
722 Posts
The OEm Ohlins shock is not exactly the same as the aftermarket unit but will work great. The OEM shock uses a variable rate spring that may not be ideal for many forks. You really want a 57mm ID by 170 mm long spring on the Ohlins. We nearly always replace the springs with Ohlins springs (1092 for that shock). There is wiggle room for the length but keep in mind that the correct rate spring will be installed with about 15mm of preload (the 170mm long spring will be 155mm installed with the shock extended).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,395 Posts
I'm looking for a DU 245 for my '95 SP, any comment on those Rick?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
722 Posts
I have never sold one of those. look out for the eye to eye length on that, the 235 has a +12mm range with a lot of folks will use (racers often looking for more. The one you link to has only a +4 mm range. I personally would not want the remote preload on my ss, the spring collar is not hard to reach and the way I use my ss, I never change my spring preload once set. We sometimes install the race type of Hydraulic preload on shocks where an 8mm socket is used to set preload for the spring, lighter while just as convenient for most, also no need for the additional appendage. There is close to a $300 premium on those adjuster. If you find a used one like that at a good price, it would seem like a good way to go. I would have to see inside before I could say whether or not it can be lengthened at a reasonable cost.

Rick
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,395 Posts
Good info, much appreciated. Mark
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
421 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The OEm Ohlins shock is not exactly the same as the aftermarket unit but will work great. The OEM shock uses a variable rate spring that may not be ideal for many forks. You really want a 57mm ID by 170 mm long spring on the Ohlins. We nearly always replace the springs with Ohlins springs (1092 for that shock). There is wiggle room for the length but keep in mind that the correct rate spring will be installed with about 15mm of preload (the 170mm long spring will be 155mm installed with the shock extended).
Many thanks Rick for the excellent info. Getting close to ordering the front fork upgrade from you.

....Just need to sort out what I am doing with the shock (as I think this is more of a limitation than the forks).

I am on a tight budget so I am looking for a good second hand shock on ebay, etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
103 Posts
...look out for the eye to eye length on that, the 235 has a +12mm range with a lot of folks will use (racers often looking for more. The one you link to has only a +4 mm range.
Right. I have an Ohlins DU235 fitted to my 1000SS race bike. However, it now also has a lighter spring and a custom 20mm ride height extension. We just couldn't get the geometry right with the standard shock length. Image attached.

From what I recall a couple of seasons ago racing old carbed 600ss bikes, a lot of riders were fitting a shock from an SSie - even just the standard Showa unit - as it was 15mm longer, thus increasing ride height.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
722 Posts
Nice mod for the shock. I have seen too many racebikes with insufficient thread engagement.

You will find that the rear wheel will start to spin up to easy once you get too high with the rear. The swing arm angle and weight transfer get to a critical point quite quickly once you get to a point. It becomes a game of just a few mm.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top