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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
for the track instead of a SBK. There is so much money that goes into a track season. You can spend $2k-$3k easy just to ride and then you need gas, tires, hotels, etc. No wonder people want some cheap Japanese bike that you don't have to worry about valve check/adjust and belt replacements every offseason. I mean sure if you do your own work it's not too bad on a SBK, but not many people do their own valve work. The extra $500 or whatever you pay for someone to do your own work is a few track days or a couple sets of tires. I just can really understand. And from my experience last season on the track it wouldn't have mattered what bike I was on. I was doing too much learning basic track riding and all and the least of my concerns was how good I guess the bike felt compared to say a Japanese bike.
 

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Thats why I bought an 05 600RR. I couldn't imagine tracking a Ducati without financial repercusions. The Honda ran perfect, smooth and effortless. Valve adjustment? How about 24K miles and a full system costing $700. A no brainer in my book until I totalled it.
 

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A Ducati is fine for the occasional track days...until you start doing a bunch of them or you start going fast. Going fast usually involves revs - and that WILL cost you big money. More than occasional track days will also affect the reliability of your Ducati.

I went to a GSX-R750 because of more power, more reliability at higher speeds, and I was tired of HAVING to work on the bike and not be able to trust it.

A friend has a Duc and a GSXR. The GSXR hasn't cost him anything other than gas, oil, and tires. The Duc - engine rebuilds, lost trackdays when the bike broke down, long nights prepping for the track, very frequent valve checks.....

If you have deep pockets or do less than a handful of trackdays in the B or C groups - go with the Duc. Otherwise.......
 

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I agree... I've only have the Duc on the track once. Just to see what it was like. But my GSX-R750 and R6 are much more reliable and after wading one 750 up, they are much cheaper to replace.
 
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I only did 6 track days last year and I plan on doubling that this year. I ride a 998 and have never had, I repeat, never had a mechanical problem. I rev the snot out of my bike. My ecu allows revs to a little over 11,000 also. Not one spec of metal in my crankcase screen either. The only maintenance I do is oil changes before every trackday and a valve inspection once a season. Now that's an inspection not an adjustment. People are getting entire seasons of racing without the Testastretta valve train moving. That's racing at the club level. The only other maintenance I do is related to suspension fluids, which if you are tracking your bike you should be doing anyway. The difference in reliability is the old generation of engines versus the Testastrettas. They are that much better. People hear about problems with the older bikes and think they apply to the newer generation. It's not the case. It's the stigma of the brand, nothing more. The difference between my yearly trackday expenses and someone elses(without crashes of course) is 3 hrs of labor at 75.00 an hour for a valve inspection. I'll keep my Duc.
 

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Ducatis tend to require more care. The newer Testeretta motors are better I am sure. I have about 12 track days on my 916, its been fairly reliable. The oil cooler developed a small leak due to vibration against the screen screws. I fixed that and have been riding the snot out of it. I routinely hit the rev limiter when I get into a dice with someone. I really enjoy the bike cause it gives such great feedback to the rider. I am sure I could get used to Japenese bikes. The ones I have ridden seemed vague in the corners. I know they werent set up right for me, and I am sure they could be dialed in, but its interesting that many people redo their suspension on the Japanese bikes, but it is not needed on the ducati. Just get it set up right and its good to go. Also, I think the twin motor is easier to ride. I can shift less cause it has the drive out of the turns at lower revs. I know its way underpowered compared to a 1000 cc Japanese four, but for me its all about confidence and stability.

Mike
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
zooom said:
hey Sam....do you regret selling your old CBR600 F2 now?....
Not really as I would have had to put some cash into it to make it a nice track bike. Needed some suspension work just because of age.

If I go Japanese it's gonna be something already set up. Maybe a nicely set up SV650 or R6. Those would be my two choices as of right now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
danielspdx said:
And it took you how long to figure this out??????
Last season was my first season and I did 7 days. The bike held up fine. However now I'm starting a new track season where I have had to get a hitch, trailer, and I want to do 12 days at least. So now I'm sort of having all this go through my head about how much $$$ wise it's adding up. Sure the initial costs are a killer. But I'm thinking now about the costs for the track bike after the season in addition to the possible valve check/adjust on my street bike. Until you start preparing for alot of rides I guess you don't realize it.
 

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grendels_arm said:
Last season was my first season and I did 7 days. The bike held up fine. However now I'm starting a new track season where I have had to get a hitch, trailer, and I want to do 12 days at least. So now I'm sort of having all this go through my head about how much $$$ wise it's adding up. Sure the initial costs are a killer. But I'm thinking now about the costs for the track bike after the season in addition to the possible valve check/adjust on my street bike. Until you start preparing for alot of rides I guess you don't realize it.
Sam my man.....based on your descriptions of your track days and your riding in general....you are not flogging the hell out of the 916 like most others here would be....so I would assume the the level of abuse the bike took from this last season would be about equal this season if your riding stays consistent....and I thought the reason mostly why you wanted a SBK track bike was to improve your skills so that they would translate right over to your 996 street bike?...hence why you were determined to find a 748 or 916 track bike in the first place as apposed to sinking $2000 into the CBR to make it a track bike or as apposed to buying a freaking SV in the 1st place!....am I wrong?
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 · (Edited)
So you're saying I'm a slow as hell on the track basically. :)

You're absolutely right about why I wanted a SBK for the track. Still would prefer one. I'm not too worried about the bike breaking down on me. Just the offseason maintenance, even through Donnie, was $$$.

Alot of why this is going thru my head is really other things financially that have just come up. I just had to put $7K into new plumbing for my home (poly pipes if you're curious) and my car is giving me problems. And the other day my tooth started to get sensitive so maybe dental bills. :)

Maybe this is just a knee jerk thought I am having. A few track days on the Duc will hopefully solve it. :)
 

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run a two valve for track fun. they can be very fast and reliable [I don't see too many snapping cranks..a-la '02+, SV's] Japanese bikes have problems too, you are just on the wrong forum to hear about them.

I ran a superbike for awhile, and I understand your frustration. They can be a lot of work/money depending on who's doing it. [kudu's to you sam, for starting off right by doing your own belts]

I do most all my own work, and that's why I finally switched. The air cooled motors are just easier for me to keep up with. I sold my superbike on sunday, and believe me after having her for 6 years...I shed a few tears. But I went out today and bought a second 2 valve.

I now run the same lap times on my SS [and lower at some tracks] that I used to run on my superbike. It has been worked on, suspension and whatever, but certainly nothing extravagant.

on a good day, if I'm on my game, I can spank some superbikes ass'

[mind you guy's...it dosen't happen ALL the time]

I think all I'm trying to say is: You can still enjoy the whole ducati thing on the track...just maybe superbikes isn't it.

Japanese generally make un-arguably great products......all, gazillon identical, of them.

I will live, and die [old age of course ;) ] on ducati's [hey lets make that a forum pledge, for new guys]
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I've never looked at SS's because they never have caught my eye I guess?How are they compared to SBK's in terms of the whole riding experience.

Congrats on selling your SBK.
 

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i will resurrect this thread in a month after some track time. what is the literal meaning of SBK, i understand what it represents.

if i lived around people who had them and rode them, i'd do $300 valve job, or less if i liked the person, then on the testerettas i'd brobably do it for less (they look sooo easy to get to), but not till i work on my own first.
if i didn't do all my work i'd have gone the japanese route.

since you've got your 996 why don't you take it slow and easy on the 916's valve adjustments? that way you'll get everything done nice and spec, can wait on the shims if they aren't in stock.
 
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