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Discussion Starter #1
Lets start a new thread on this...

I sorta 95+ percent confirmed that the leak is at the Clutch Shaft--- behind the Clutch Slave Cylinder. Slave Cylinder dry and ok...

So, going on that assumption what is the consensus of the group on the remedy?
 

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I'm paying close attention to your thread. After a louder, more violent than usual, "clunk" when downshifting, I now have oil coming out of the clutch side, spinning oil all over (vented clutch cover). I switched the pressure plate/bearings and still have the same problem.

Not attempting to thread jack. Just wondering how close our problems are.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the post, but I think we are on opposite ends of the same shaft... my leak is on the alternator side, very near the clutch slave cylinder...in fact in-board of it.
 

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I dont know if these are 900's or 750's since neither of you identified your bikes.
Either way you know if you have a wet clutch or a dry clutch (I am assuming here). The clutch rod has 2 small 0 rings that seal the rod nearest the slave cylinder. Maybe they need looking at? To access this rod you will need to remove the pressure plate from the clutch assembly. With a dry clutch there is also a small seal on the clutch side to be mindful of. The wet clutch does not have that seal, just the 2 0 rings closest to the slave cylinder. Just a thought,
I hope this helps
 

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Also clean and dry the area very well. then apply some baby powder or talcum in the area. It should make tracing the origin of the leak a little easier.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Mine is a 1999 900SS.

My clutch is a Dry Multi Plate.

Please see this diagram: http://issuu.com/ducatiomaha/docs/ss900ie_usa-00

My leak is occurring around the clutch push rod right where the line for number 29 points to the rod. Right there is where the rod emerges from the case.

Is the case supposed to be wet behind/inside that point?

Thanks for your interest and help.
 

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I'm paying close attention to your thread. After a louder, more violent than usual, "clunk" when downshifting, I now have oil coming out of the clutch side, spinning oil all over (vented clutch cover). I switched the pressure plate/bearings and still have the same problem.

Not attempting to thread jack. Just wondering how close our problems are.
There is a seal on the clutch basket, right at the end of it (where the rod goes through). You can pop it out with a screwdriver and replace it with a new one. Just make sure you fit the new seal the right way (each side is different).
 

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To the OP...FWIW, I have been told that this is a common place for leaks on this model because the cylinder that contains the rod (and the two o rings) is not always machined well. I have had the o rings replaced twice since I've had mine (a little over a year). It was left that if it starts leaking again, as long as it was minor, I would wipe it and move on.

I have not confirmed this with a dealer...this was an indy shop that has quite a few customers with this model duc. They said one of their customers had the cylinder walls smoothed and larger o rings (there was more to that story that meant $$$, but I forget now).
 

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BMW haters germany - in the brothel part IV

take a look at the pictures that i took during
the instalation of my 32mm ncr slave cylinder:

the problem is related to the fact the stock and
aftermarket slave cylinders are shaped differently
towards the alternator case.
see the gap between the slave and the alternator
case in picture number one with the black ncr
slave:






for comparison, gap closed with stock slave:





both slaves side view:








stock slave, see red o-ring, that will prevent
any leaking for sure:







the terror zone:





Solution could be to have some seal added to
that point, and wipe away any minor oil spray
every now and then.




two more things that i hope you can take as kind
as they were meant:
i consider it bad style to open up two threads
about the same problem in two sections of the
board at the same time, just because you did
not receive some help instantly.
i have to add that with the "alarm mode" in which
your post are written, about minor things mainly,
it is no wonder that some people might do not
take them too seriously.

and please be so kind to take this

BMW Pictures out of your constant display.


:)
 

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Discussion Starter #10
OK- I changed the signature picture...

I started a new post under a new title- not because I was not getting replies, but because the subject had changed.

One of the good things about forums- in general- is that new people use it as a resource. It is a good thing to have threads titled appropriately to the issue being discussed. My issue changed from sprocket leak to shaft leak...

I am a new guy here but have been on motorcycle forums since before they were forums- back in the listserv days. Every one has a different culture. I am learning this one.

I appreciate your time and efforts in posting your pictures. I finally got an appropriate reply via private mail that was actually responsive to my questions and should lead to repairs.

Thanks again.
 

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thank you, it is much nicer without the bmw
pictures now, the supersport looks good in
black for sure.

:)

I finally got an appropriate reply via private mail that was actually responsive to my questions and should lead to repairs.
what is the problem on your bike then ?
i'd like to know.

:think:
 

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I'm glad you said received relevant information, but if I may throw some thoughts into the proverbial ring:

You say you have a dry clutch, so you can't have a leak on the clutch shaft. the entire system is dry the way through. Even the clutch slave is self contained and can be removed complete with line and master cylinder without disturbing any fluid.

If you have moisture, it's either clutch fluid or motor oil. First, determine which. If it's clutch fluid, your clutch slave is leaking. If it's motor oil, then the motor case is leaking somewhere, and would require breaking the motor apart to rectify. This is extremely rare. My vote's on the clutch slave.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
OK... this thread is getting long and for the sake of others I will do a very brief re-cap.

It is OIL, not DOT4.

My Clutch Slave is not leaking (yet?)

The oil is coming out of the case where the clutch rod emerges.

There is oil in the motor just above the clutch rod that is supposed to be contained by the Alternator Cover and case join. Yes the clutch is dry but leaks happen.

The alternator cover is supposed to be sealed by the liquid gasket. To keep the oil where it is suppoed to be, and away from where it is not suppoed to be.

The area just above the clutch rod is supposed to be sealed with the gasket material but it sometimes fails and oil can drip down on the rod and it runs out.

There is no seal on the rod because it is supposed to be dry.

The remedy is to drain the oil, remove the Alternator cover, clean off the old gasket goop, clean and dry everything, reseal with fresh goop. Refill the oil, live happy.

Many thanks to our friend Australia who provided the technical information.

For what it is worth... I believe him but I have not done the work yet... when I do, I will make pictures and report.
 

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...for the sake of others I will do a very brief re-cap.
i'd call this a neccessarity, to come up with answers
received for questions that had been put into an
open discussion board.

:)


The oil is coming out of the case where the clutch rod emerges.
There is oil in the motor just above the clutch rod that is supposed to be contained by the Alternator Cover and case join. Yes the clutch is dry but leaks happen.





green arrow points to where clutch rod comes out:






The alternator cover is supposed to be sealed by the liquid gasket. To keep the oil where it is supposed to be, and away from where it is not suppoed to be.
The area just above the clutch rod is supposed to be sealed with the gasket material but it sometimes fails and oil can drip down on the rod and it runs out.
There is no seal on the rod because it is supposed to be dry.
it is some time that i saw the open engine, but
from the picture it looks as if there would be
some oil above the open clutch rod at any time.

:think:


The remedy is to drain the oil, remove the Alternator cover, clean off the old gasket goop, clean and dry everything, reseal with fresh goop. Refill the oil, live happy.
you have my best wishes. :)


Many thanks to our friend Australia who provided the technical information.
was it brad ? why has he been to shy to write
in the topic ?

:think:
 

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Discussion Starter #17
It was Bradblack who provided the tip and information.

Thanks to muschi for the photo- that right there explains it for me!

Thanks to Brad and all the others for the education... now to order that gasket..
 

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Thanks to muschi for the photo- that right there explains it for me!

hm - i am somewhat slow with understanding,
does the oil only drips out if the seal is defect
where the green arrow points at ?

i thought it could get in at the end of the gear shaft
further back in where the red arrow is, but i
will probably be wrong then ?

:think:


 

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Discussion Starter #19
This is the new gasket from Cycleworks at ca-cycleworks.com

They shipped fast, had good technical advice about the ignition pick-up shim thickness and the price was very reasonable.

This is what it looked like before closing up the case- after a lot of cleaning up the old goop.



Test ride this morning reveals no leaky so far!

Thanks to st2lemans for the tip on the gasket. Problem solved
 

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Discussion Starter #20 (Edited)
After a good number of miles and careful observation ---- I can report the new fiber gasket is doing its job and there is no leak.

Regarding this repair. I will call this project well within the skills of an average DIY mechanic. No special tools required and "fear factor" was medium.

TIPS:
-First clean as best as you can around the entire Alternator Case area.
- Drain the oil

- Remove the Clutch Slave Cylinder and keep the Shaft Cover and 2 o-rings in a clean and safe place.

- You will also have to remove the side stand and gear shift linkage. Take a marker and note the position of the shifter on the splines. You will want to put it back where it was unless you like surprises when you go on the test ride later.

- Remove the 5mm case screws and put them on a clean piece of paper in the sequential order in which they were removed. I did not measure each one but it looks as if there are at least two different sizes of screws. I may be wrong here but I was careful to put each screw back where it came from.

- Take note that there is one screw under (behind) the clutch slave area. If your bike is dirty you may not see it.

- Remove the 4mm screws that retain the Ignition Pick up. Clean it and keep it clean. Notice there are two shims. One is thick and one is thin. If you install a fiber gasket (as I did) you must remove the thin one to maintain the distance the Ignition Sensor is from its target. The new gasket is the same thickness as the thin shim and after reassembly the distance will be correct.

- Now you are ready to remove the alternator cover. It will be stuck. Be careful to not deface or mar the surface of the cover by prying with a screwdriver. I used a rubber mallet and tapped until the cover was just barely loose.

- Have an oil catch pan ready as you will have a lot of oil pour out. The alternator (stator) runs in an oil bath and the entire area is oily.

- Slide the cover outboard keeping it oriented as much as you can in the same position it is when installed... in other words be careful and go slow. Do not twist it, do not rock it. Just gentle pull. There will be resistance and it will feel like it is not loose. The oil film makes a sticky feel but it will release if pulled. Note: There are two locating pins, one on top and one in front of the case. Do not attempt to rotate the Alternator Cover since the pins will prevent the rotation.

- The case will still be connected to the motor by the ignition wiring. You can disconnect the wire or leave it connected. If you leave it connected like I did you must have a suitable place to lay the case so that it does not hang by the wire. Plan Ahead.

- The job now is to clean the mating surfaces of the engine block and the alternator case. The old gasket material must be removed completely. Do not let any of the old materia fall and remain inside the engine. Do not use an overly sharp instrument on the case edges because they are both soft aluminum. If you scrape be really careful not to bevel the edge, or round the edge. You want a perfectly flat and square mating surface.

I used a thin and narrow putty knife which I sharpened with a file to be perfectly square on the end and perfectly flat across- so as not to induce a bevel on the case. Work slowly and carefully.

Note: My alternator case had a casting imperfection which I addressed by gently removing some aluminum material with a very sharp tool. If you do this- proceed at your own peril. I ended up with a perfectly flat, shiny, and clean case. It took a long time and I used a very bright light to inspect every millimeter of both sides- several times. I then cleaned the edges again with Acetone.

The gasket can be installed when you are all clean. Wash your hands... reinspect. Re assemble. Be sure you have accounted for all the shims on the Ignition sensor. Use good work habits to tighten the bolts loosely until all are in place then tighten in sequence- lightly at first then tighter and tighter. This is soft aluminum. Go slow and be careful.

- Note that the screw holes for the clutch slave are not the screw holes for the case- even though they both accept hex head screws of the same diameter... they are not the same depth.

You can do this entire job in 2 hours. I did it in 4. I spent more time cleaning the edges of the case than on anything else. I cannot stress enough that you must be careful to not mar or deface the edges of either case. they must remain perfectly flat and not rounded on the edges.

You only get one chance to do this correctly but you will have many chances to screw it up...

That pretty much covers it... refill with clean oil, clean up and go for a ride.


I will consider this issue a "case closed" and move along.
 
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