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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I need some insight and advice. First off, I‘m totally ignorant about Ducatis. I rode a few bikes in the past, couple of Harleys but mostly BMWs. My favorite by far was the R1200GS. I’ve been “bikeless“ the last 10 years. Looking to get back riding and found a great deal on a GS but it comes as a package with a Multistrada and other assorted bike stuff (lady clearing out her garage). Both bikes have been garaged and haven’t been ridden for the last several years but seem well cared for (fuel stabilizer, trickle chargers,….started up on first try). Both are extremely low mileage. (Lost one of the riders shortly after purchase and other lost desire to ride) The Multistrada is a 2012 Pikes Peak edition and has only 600 miles on it! My initial plan was to buy the package, sell the Ducati and keep the GS as its a bike I’m familiar with and loved. (It has only 800 miles on it). But I’m wondering if I might like the Ducati just as much. I’m a little concerned about how the seat height would be, I’m only 5’7’, but then again I did OK on the standard GS (was able to touch toes on both sides and just used left foot down at stops). It’s also sounds like a lot “more bike“ than I was used to (although I did have a K1200S for a while). I do not do any off rode, never plan to track the bike and mostly will be doing day trips and occasionally longer touring.

Anybody want to talk me into reversing plans and keeping the Ducati and selling the GS? (I think that would be a better net price as the GS has a higher resale value). Any advice appreciated.
 

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Where the heck are you at? buy it! I want that Multi!!

TBH, if you're more familiar with BMWs, I'd keep that.
 

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What a wonderful dilemma! Good luck with whatever choice you make.


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I'm sure you'll find candidates to buy the other one here in the forum (myself included), just let us know!

Regarding your doubt: although of similar looking (or style) those are two completely different animals. Think of a Mercedes GLE 2.0T vs a BMW X3M, that's more or less the comparison, the GS being the GLE and the Multi the X3M. Both are excellent machines and quite capable, one will give you more comfortable for great long rides, the other will put a smile on your face and a "holy sh.t" in your head every time you twist the throttle.

It will mostly depend on your riding style and how much you like spirited riding. But honestly you can't go wrong on that choice.
 

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Keep the GS and sell the Ducati.
Do not start or look at the Ducati and whatever you do do not ride the Ducati.
The ducati needs belts now at least and both need a first service plus general going over plus tires. see what you get for quotes on either and then sell the Ducati, do not ride the Ducati.
Did you ride the Ducati? I told you not to now you see it is more fun than the BMW and you are thinking with passion instead of sensibly, I told you NOT to ride the Ducati.

To be honest given what you plan on doing "mostly will be doing day trips and occasionally longer touring. " I would sell both and buy a lighter and smaller bike than either. A 900gs, tiger 900, ducati scrambler and enjoy not pushing around a 500lb plus bike. If touring then you may like the big bikes.
 

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Personally after many experiences with dealers of about every brand imaginable, my advice is, whatever brand has good service and is close is the bike I'd keep. Stop in, have a conversation with the service manager and dealership about their service options, cost and parts availability. Ask them point blank, if I have a problem tomorrow how long will it take you to get me in and fix it? Go by gut feel, look around, talk to customers entering or leaving the service area as to their experiences. Eventually something will break, something that requires dealer service, that's when a good dealer close by is going to make you love or hate the bike or brand.

I'm about to fire sale a very new 1260s due to having one horrible dealership option 2hrs away...the only other is nearly 5hrs away. Sales department talked a good story but the entire dealership is a train wreck. lesson learned.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the advice so far, keep it coming.
The part about the big smile effect of the Ducati is just what has me intrigued and giving me second thoughts about a new experience beyond the GS. Then again I’m 62 now and probably more suited to the Blue Ridge parkway than the Tail of the Dragon.
I’m in western NC and the point about nearby service is a good one. Not too far to the BMW service in Asheville but not sure if there is a Ducati shop closer than 2-3 hours.
If I decide to stick with the plan and sell the Ducati I’ll definitely be back posting here (have to make a certain number before can enter classified). The bike has a lot of sentimental value to the seller (who is also my neighbor), it was her fathers, and she is making me promise to “find it a good home”. So i hope not to end up listing on eBay or some such market.
 

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The part about the big smile effect of the Ducati is just what has me intrigued and giving me second thoughts about a new experience beyond the GS. Then again I’m 62 now and probably more suited to the Blue Ridge parkway than the Tail of the Dragon.
I went into the dealer who was 2 hrs away to look at a Yamaha Super T because the Yamaha dealer 28 miles away did not have one to ride. Did not really plan to buy from them but stick with the local who has always taken care of me on other things. The slick salesman had me ride the Multi which gave me the smile factor, wanted me to buy a 2 year old leftover but I went for current model year...she was slick until I had to deal with the service dept for the initial service (horrible attitude) and the latest brake issue. My smile turned into an angry face that is not going to ever going away. I'm back to looking at the Yamaha but not until the supply chain issues get better.
 

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There's a fair number of Multistrada owners that would consider the 2012-2014 Pikes Peak to be the best Multi ever made, if your criteria is sporting capability. But with that low mileage, I'm not sure what I'd do with it. It's not really a collectors item. Yet. It may never be. But if any Multistrada was ever going to be, it would be that one.

I'd be tempted to ride the GS, and take really good care of the MTS without riding it for the next 5 years. By then it should be clearer if those early 1200s will have any collector value.
 

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...I'm about to fire sale a very new 1260s due to having one horrible dealership option 2hrs away...the only other is nearly 5hrs away. Sales department talked a good story but the entire dealership is a train wreck. lesson learned.
That's funny. I've got the exact opposite problem. Ducati dealer is great! BMW dealer should be renamed "stealer"! LOL
 

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Well what a dilemma to be in lol---Now I am the odd person here, I would keep the BMW but then that what I mostly ride as well & have for 40 years. I am familiar with the roads near you I think -I am from Greenville SC (now in Florida) -But I know all the roads around Asheville, Hendersonville, Murphy, Brevard-I used to run Caesars Head every weekend --you have a dealer not that far away in Greenville--Touring Sport. If you were closer to me I'd say bring the BMW to me because I am a BMW Motorcycle Master Tech but alas I am a bit too far for you. I will say that I personally am not a big fan of the CAN BUS electrical system on the BMW it makes it alot harder for the owner to do their own service because because of all the computers --but then Ducati uses CAB BUS as well--I would suggest make the purchase, --Take both bikes out for a 100 mile ride. See which you like the most, and take into account the type of riding you plan to do---local close to home or long distance. Keep the one that puts the biggest smile on your face & will do what you want it to do. ----Or screw it--Just keep both have one for touring & one for play time lol--There is no such thing as too many bikes
 
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That's funny. I've got the exact opposite problem. Ducati dealer is great! BMW dealer should be renamed "stealer"! LOL
What's even more funny is that my first want was two BMW's, looking at both a GS and GT. I quickly learned that the dealer was run by a bunch of a-holes so I scratched them off my list completely. If it was not for the two gentlemen I ran into in the dealership who gave me insight I may have made that mistake. One was traveling through on a month long trip and needed a simple service job...had been there for an entire day and still not done and he was not happy because he made the appointment a week in advance. He was the nicest guy in the world and the converstation I overheard should never happen to any service customer anywhere. The other was a long term BMW rider who I met in the parking lot where they were doing demo rides. After a 10 minute conversation he told me, "those are great bikes you are considering but don't buy them from these guys". Every bike has issues, it's really the dealer that can make or break the experience.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Seems the consensus is take the deal and sort it out later after riding them both. That makes a ton of sense and I think I can afford both for short run and if totally wrong and I’m too old to get back into riding the deal is so good I‘m confident I could sell both and at least break even.

Quick question. The Ducati has a mostly clear windscreen but most pictures I can find of 2012 vintage Pikes Peak editions have a smaller, solid, carbon fiber looking screen. Is this an aftermarket mod? Should I look for the original?

Thanks again.
1009664
 

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I need some insight and advice. First off, I‘m totally ignorant about Ducatis. I rode a few bikes in the past, couple of Harleys but mostly BMWs. My favorite by far was the R1200GS. I’ve been “bikeless“ the last 10 years. Looking to get back riding and found a great deal on a GS but it comes as a package with a Multistrada and other assorted bike stuff (lady clearing out her garage). Both bikes have been garaged and haven’t been ridden for the last several years but seem well cared for (fuel stabilizer, trickle chargers,….started up on first try). Both are extremely low mileage. (Lost one of the riders shortly after purchase and other lost desire to ride) The Multistrada is a 2012 Pikes Peak edition and has only 600 miles on it! My initial plan was to buy the package, sell the Ducati and keep the GS as its a bike I’m familiar with and loved. (It has only 800 miles on it). But I’m wondering if I might like the Ducati just as much. I’m a little concerned about how the seat height would be, I’m only 5’7’, but then again I did OK on the standard GS (was able to touch toes on both sides and just used left foot down at stops). It’s also sounds like a lot “more bike“ than I was used to (although I did have a K1200S for a while). I do not do any off rode, never plan to track the bike and mostly will be doing day trips and occasionally longer touring.

Anybody want to talk me into reversing plans and keeping the Ducati and selling the GS? (I think that would be a better net price as the GS has a higher resale value). Any advice appreciated.
Hi Dedmo,
What year is the BMW?
I found a 2016 1200 GSA Factory Low last year for $10,000, with 30,000 miles on her. I could not pass it up, so I bought it.
Having 5 bikes in the garage was a bit much, so I sold three of my four Ducatis, 2005 1000DS Multistrada, 2007 S4RS Monster & a 1998 900 FE. I still have the ST3, which I am getting back on the road, hopefully by the end of summer.
I thought the Multi would be my fire road bike, but with both wheels being 17" it was ok but not great. It was a bit hard to not sink the front wheel around turns. That is why I have the BMW now. Yes she is a bit heavy and hard to push around at low speeds, but once on the road she is a dream & when I am long trips eating up asphalt, a very comfortable ride. I have not been in any heavy dirt yet, but I am not worried about that at all. I can drop her, pick her up and go on.
I had to change out the shocks, the stock front one started leaking about a month after I purchased her. Plus I went ahead and changed out from the Factory Low to the standard height GSA with a new center stand and side stand. I installed Tractive Shocks that where a straight swap into the stock ESA set up. I find the BMW is a bit soulless, but she handles so well I can live without the loud exhaust. She is a bit taller than all my Multi, but I am getting smoother and smoother on her & soon will be able to not have that be a issue. The GSA is more flickable than I first would have guessed.
While I am sorry I sold the Monster & 900 FE, I felt the older style Multi would not have been the bike that BMW is. The BMW is much easier to service, but if the dealer has to work on her, very close to owning a Ducati. Not to say you can't work on the Ducatis, belts and valves are more involved than on the BMW.
The BMW is a totally different bike than the Ducati Pikes Peak, but you will love them both in different ways. Me personally, I still want a Ducati in my garage, to play around on and put a smile on my face. The BMW is my long distance bike, touring bike and fire roads thrown in there every once in while. I won't care if I drop her, she is to be rode.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Hi Dedmo,
What year is the BMW?
I found a 2016 1200 GSA Factory Low last year for $10,000, with 30,000 miles on her. I could not pass it up, so I bought it.
Having 5 bikes in the garage was a bit much, so I sold three of my four Ducatis, 2005 1000DS Multistrada, 2007 S4RS Monster & a 1998 900 FE. I still have the ST3, which I am getting back on the road, hopefully by the end of summer.
I thought the Multi would be my fire road bike, but with both wheels being 17" it was ok but not great. It was a bit hard to not sink the front wheel around turns. That is why I have the BMW now. Yes she is a bit heavy and hard to push around at low speeds, but once on the road she is a dream & when I am long trips eating up asphalt, a very comfortable ride. I have not been in any heavy dirt yet, but I am not worried about that at all. I can drop her, pick her up and go on.
I had to change out the shocks, the stock front one started leaking about a month after I purchased her. Plus I went ahead and changed out from the Factory Low to the standard height GSA with a new center stand and side stand. I installed Tractive Shocks that where a straight swap into the stock ESA set up. I find the BMW is a bit soulless, but she handles so well I can live without the loud exhaust. She is a bit taller than all my Multi, but I am getting smoother and smoother on her & soon will be able to not have that be a issue. The GSA is more flickable than I first would have guessed.
While I am sorry I sold the Monster & 900 FE, I felt the older style Multi would not have been the bike that BMW is. The BMW is much easier to service, but if the dealer has to work on her, very close to owning a Ducati. Not to say you can't work on the Ducatis, belts and valves are more involved than on the BMW.
The BMW is a totally different bike than the Ducati Pikes Peak, but you will love them both in different ways. Me personally, I still want a Ducati in my garage, to play around on and put a smile on my face. The BMW is my long distance bike, touring bike and fire roads thrown in there every once in while. I won't care if I drop her, she is to be rode.
The GS is a 2014, factory low suspension, side and top vario cases, crash bars, aux lights, Nav V (needs major updates), ….really everything I would have done myself. But still intrigued by Ducati if it really is a lighter, better handling road bike. Wish I could keep both, and might for a short while but just can‘t justify both.
 

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Quick question. The Ducati has a mostly clear windscreen but most pictures I can find of 2012 vintage Pikes Peak editions have a smaller, solid, carbon fiber looking screen. Is this an aftermarket mod? Should I look for the original?
All kinds of windscreen options in the aftermarket, including the small carbon fiber looking ones. Just do a google search for "2012 Ducati multistrada windscreen" and you will see many different types.
 

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As a BMW guy for 4 decades let me give you my thought on the GS --I also tell all of my customers this exact same thing. --The BMW GS series from the first 1981 R80GS to the current R1200GS variant --The GS does nothing great--But it does everything well. I cant speak of the Multi as I do not nor do I plan to ever own one. The GS I personally cant ride, they hurt my back after 50 miles so much I have to get off, but then again so do the R RT--K GT, & K-LT-- I cant sit that upright in the saddle --it hammers my lower back, I have to ride leaned over a little --(I'll be 62 in2 months) -My R100RS's R90S's, R100SRS, R1100S, 91 Ducati 900SS & Ducati 907ie these all lean me forward just enough to be comfortable. --But everyone is different--Thats why I say take them both out for a minimum of 100 miles each & see which one fits you the best--I am at the moment riding a 2007 F650gs Dakar as a daily commuter --but it's only 25 miles each way to work and I am fine--If I had to do 100 plus miles one way -I dont think I could unless at the very least I put a better seat on it
 
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Buy them both, get them back on the road.
Ride each for whatever time you deem enough, then decide what to do.
My $2.
 

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Both very nice bikes....
The 2012 Pikes peak is an awesome ride, the GS is too, just a bit bland by comparison.

If you were going off road or making a habit out of touring with luggage i would say keep the GS, if you intend to do your own servicing, keep the GS, they're a doddle to work on and by comparison to the Duke, cheap to run.

However, if you're doing day trips, light touring and just ripping around town the PP Multi is a dead set brilliant bike, @ducvet says rightly that it needs belts, they are more difficult to service yourself so it's an added expense, but to me, for what you want to do with it, it's a small price to pay, CofG on the multi will be lower than the GS despite what common sense tells you and they are way faster, much more enjoyable with serious wave of torque to ride on.

They both need tyres, basic service, full fluids and for the PP, belts, considering the mileage you won't have any problems selling either, you sir, have a difficult decision to make, i know what i'd choose, even though i just bought a BMW.......
 

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It's not great for any machines to just sit around. What might have failed under warranty, and on the Duc, things will fail and now they fail out of warranty. If I was buying to ride and not to collect (neither of these are collectible) I'd rather it had 6K miles than 600 but then again, you get the joy of breaking it in.

The differences in feel are huge. The GS will be softer, probably more comfortable for you (it is for me), slower steering and less powerful overall but with a smoothness the Ducati won't match. OTOH, the Ducati will feel very sporting by comparison with roll on wheelies in first and second and a motor that spins far more freely. I have a fondness for the '10-'12 Multis because they are the lightest and most flickable of the Multis I have ridden. Someone mentioned the '13-14 models as being similar to the 10-12s. That is not really the case since suspension components and tuning (with the variable valve timing) make them significantly different, albeit they are constructed of very similar components, including the frame. I'd consider the 10-12 models to be their own sub category although the '13-14s are the closest to them in design. Evolutionary differences but with enough differentiation to make them feel different over the road.

By comparison to a GS,a '12 Multi will feel like a bike with half the weight, especially through the steering although the GS is probably the lightest steering of all its contemporary BMW tourers. You will immediately notice that difference and probably form a preference but you may like them both for different reasons. I owned a GS and my Multi side by side and found each had its charms. Respecting these vintages, the Ducati will feel simple and less substantial, much more primal than the BMW on the road but it will fight back by being much more explosive and responsive to your minor body movements and control inputs and a far more sporting ride than the GS. For comfort, the BMW should be superior for the average bear and will probably be less fussy overall.

That these bikes have so few miles is a good thing, but it can be a bad thing too. The tires, batteries, rubber bits and so on continue to age even if the bike isn't ridden.
 
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