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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I am a forum newbie on the brink of a Sport Classic purchase and, after a considerable period of "lurking", I decided to register, introduce myself, and ask a question.

As for the introduction: I am a 58 year-old ex-pat Brit living in Colorado (moniker is pun on county name). I got my original m/c license in England back in 1967, and well-remember the cafe racers of that era (mostly Nortons, BSAs, Triumphs, Royal Enfields, Velocettes, etc and various combinations of same). I currently own a 1983 Suzuki GS750ES and 2005 Kawasaki ZZR1200. The GS is retained for largely sentimental reasons, the ZZR as a sporting two-up ride for myself and wife. The Sport Classic would be used mainly for local (less than 150 miles) solo rides up the nearby Rocky Mountain Front Range canyons at speeds generally below 85 mph. I am fortunate enough to live only 1/4 mile from the mouth of one 17-mile canyon, which leads to other fine motorcycling roads.

After almost 3 years of humming and hawing, I finally attended a recent Ducati Demo Day and rode an 09 SC1000 Biposto (and also a Monster 1100S) for about 17 miles (35 minutes). For at least this short period, I found the riding position natural/comfortable, and the inexpressable joy of riding this motorcycle took about 30 years off my age). The decision to buy a left-over, new 08 SC1000 Biposto was just about made.....until I received a telephone call from a private seller asking if I would be interested in buying his 07 SC1000S Biposto, for somewhat less money, of course.

I know that (relative) comfort is subjective, and that the 07 SC1000S Biposto has lower bars and higher pegs than the equivalent naked version, but I am interested in the comments of those who have ridden both for moderate distances (say, 100 miles or more at a stretch). I have read various "comfort threads" on this forum (including DUCeditor's interesting comments about comfort dependencies on intended use, rider stature, etc) but many comments (and magazine reviews) concern the 06 SC1000 Monoposto riding position, and I am unsure if the 07 SC1000S Biposto is essentially unchanged in that regard. Therefore, I would welcome any comparative comments from riders experienced with both 07/08 Biposto versions. At my "dignified" age ;) the sporting motorcycling spirit is still strong but the flesh (or bones) are less so. If there is sufficient encouragement here, I will, of course test ride the "S". However, the subject bike is located about 70 miles from me, hence the need for motivation. I find both "S" and "non-S" extraordinarliy attractive bikes, with a slight nod going to the "S", largely because the fairing reminds me of some Dunstall Nortons and Velocette Thruxtons from my youth. BTW, the last British GP that I attended in that "youth" was at Brands Hatch in southern England, and featured a certain Paul Smart.

Finally, may I congratulate the contributers on the quality of this forum, and to express my appreciation of the information available here.

Bolder
 

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As a GT owner I can't give any personal experience with the SC's, but I will say great 1st post and welcome to the forum!
 

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I can't really comment on the difference between the two bikes except that with each different bike (seat ) you will be using different butt muscles of course. Give and take sort of thing....Good luck on your quest and welcome to this site. You will never do it any younger :)Have fun...
 

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I'm 40 now and currently own a 2008 Sport 1000 Biposto.

It is beautiful to look at, gets a fair share of looks, handles reasonably well and has that undeniable Ducati sound. On the minus side, it can be a bit rough on the wrists and hands for long periods of time (45 minutes or more) if you aren't at speeds greater than 45mph where the wind helps take some of the pressure off your hands and wrists. Also, if you're riding in the twisty bits where you are working the bike a bit more, you won't feel it in the hands and wrists much. But if you are tooling around town or on basic side roads at 30-45mph your wrists and hands might take a little bit of a beating.

The older pre-2008 models with lower clip ons and higher pegs will only be more of a compromise. The difference in clip-on height and peg location might not sound like much, but ride the bike for 45 minutes or more and you'll notice it.

The Sport 1000 are unique bikes and tend to feel a bit heavy, don't like to be lugged down below 2,500 RPM (this can be improved with a sprocket change) and in general are just a different kind of beast. You've obviously ridden one and how it feels to you is the most critical piece. If you can get an extended ride with the older version that might help make your decision a bit easier. If this will be your only bike, just try and keep in mind that the Sport 1000 is more of a sport bike-type ride. It isn't nearly as aggressive as the Sport 1000S model, but it is definitely more sport than relaxed classic like the GT 1000, Triumph Bonneville or even the Truxton to an extent. The Truxton has a less aggressive reach to the bars and more upright riding position. The peg to seat ratio on the Truxton is more aggressive (for me anyways) and the weight is carried a bit lower compared to the Sport 1000.

I only say all that not to discourage you, but to set up realistic expectations so you'll be happy later on. It is a beautiful bike, sounds wonderful and is fairly unique and rare.

Good luck!

-jamie
 

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welcome!:cool:
you will love the S1000 2008 model.
but i can't comment on the '1000S'.

the S1000 08 will take a little getting used to, but it seems more to your riding taste (and possibly age) than the '1000S'. the riding position on the latter seems too aggressive.

recommendation: buy the S1000 if you can justify the money.
you'll get used to it in no time.
 

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I'm 47yrs old and well remember the 750SS from when I was a teenager and lusted after it but instead rode around on a clapped out XT500. When I first saw the 1000S in the shop I was there to pick up a part for my Vmax. Three weeks later I had a 1000S sitting where my R1 used to be....

I've had the 1000S for 12 months and have put on about 11,000kms of purely weekend riding. My longest day was about 550km. I'm tall, 6'4" and the bike fits me very comfortably. I find the pegs and bars in just the right spots. However, first thing I did was remove the "spacers" and raise the clips ons as high as I could. There's no problem clearing the fairing, but you do need to turn the clip ons in a bit. It's a much better position in my view. Having done that, the bike was a perfect fit. The only problem I had at the end of that 550 km day was sore hands from the Rizoma grips - they're not really soft enough and get uncomfortable after a while. Nice bling, but I would never buy them again. I don't think you'll find comfort an issue for 150 mile days. Though your jaw might hurt from the permanent grin under your helmet!

Interestingly I found the seat comfortable sitting near the front or near the rear. It surprised me as my experience with most sport bikes is that there is only one real comfortable spot on the seat. not so with this bike. Mind you, short people will only ever sit near the front because the reach to the bars is longer. Other thing to comment on the seat. It's more comfortable on the road that sitting on it in the showroom floor. Surprisingly more comfortable.

If you're after a memory lane trip but with modern performance, I don't think you can go past the S. That bubble fairing is a permanent reminder on the road of my teenage lust years - it FEELS classic and '70s but performs like a modern bike.

I've owned 24 bikes in 31 years of riding, mostly sport bikes. None of them, with the exception of my first real superbike - the top heavy slow steering Katana of 1982 - compares to the pleasure this Sport Classic 1000S brings to me. :)

I considered the naked version, but I think the S is definitely the real classic trip for a sports bike. :)
 

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oh ya, one other change you will really have to make to ensure the bike is comfortable. The front forks on the 1000S come with too much sag. This makes the front end harsh. I weigh about 210 pounds in my riding gear and was losing 40% of my front fork travel just sitting on the bike!

I measured up the sag and determined I needed to add 14mm spacers to each fork leg in order to preload the springs. Worked beautifully. Now, I know there are lots of views and opinions about fixing the front forks, but I suggest trying the simple thing first. You'll need a "pin spanner" to remove the fork caps, and you'll need to spend about $4 for some spacer material (I used a collection of large steel washers). Takes about 2 hrs all up, gotta take the fairing off etc.

this is a key mod to ensure the bike is comfortable.

There are heaps of threads about measuring and setting sag, and about preloading the forks, but if you have any questions about how I did it, just pm me. cheers
 

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Discussion Starter #8
My sincere, if tardy, thanks to all of you who posted information and opinions. There really is no substitute for what you can learn from those "who have been there".

After reading your comments, and contacting local dealers, I was offered a good deal if I signed up by the end of the month (last Saturday). Of course, some of this may be a dealer tactic, or possibly a legitimate dealer desire to hit a monthly sales target and minimize floor charges. Whatever, I finalized the deal and insurance on Friday, and picked up a new, black 08 SC1000 Biposto on Saturday., This rush, plus a concern that I could ride the bike well into my sixties, pushed me into the "naked" camp. Saving a lot of money off the “sticker price” also gave me feeling of comfort, since that will pay for a bunch of mods.

I should add that I wore my "Mike Hailwood" boots, bought in England in 1970, for the inaugural ride home. Like all cafe-racer period motorcycle gear, they do not provide the protection of today's motorcycle clothing, but somehow dusting off these old boots seemed appropriate for riding the "retro" to its new home. If I could have found my old white silk scarf, and had an open-face helmet handy, I probably would have worn those, too.

I have only ridden 130 miles so far, and so it is way too early to form a well-based opinion of the bike. Having said that, I will say that the “dreaded” front fork never gave me a problem on the smooth highways on the way home from the dealer, but I was surprised by the harshness over some rough surfaces on the mountain roads that I rode the following day. Especially since I had never even noticed this rough section on the Kawasaki ZZR1200, nor even on my old 1983 Suzuki GS750ES. I shall be taking your advice, Dadda, and checking the front suspension sag (about same riding weight as you), and add any required spacers when I can find a tool to remove the fork caps. After that, a thorough read of all the suspension threads, and maybe some changes in spring rate and fork oil. However, I shall confess that I haven’t yet had the chance to dial in the rear (adjustable) shocks, nor even find a gauge that is small enough to check the front tire pressure! (where's the "blush" icon?)

Once again, many thanks to all of you for your advice and encouragement.

Bolder
 

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Congrats, BB! Welcome to the asylum :crazy: and enjoy the new bike! :abduct:

Debby
 

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Good for you Bolder. Great posts & nice to hear from another Brit from the same era. Enjoy your new bike!

P.S.

How authentic are your 'Mike Hailwood Boots'? I saw the great man race & he used to wear through his boots until his toes bled....:eek:
 

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Congratulations on the purchase. The 1000S is in fact gorgeous, but I think you probably made the right choice. There is practically no limit to how the riding position of the naked version can be adjusted, if it becomes necessary. With the S you are possibly doomed to suffer for fashion.

Hope you have a ball with it. It is a sweet bike for sure.
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
Good for you Bolder. Great posts & nice to hear from another Brit from the same era. Enjoy your new bike!

P.S.

How authentic are your 'Mike Hailwood Boots'? I saw the great man race & he used to wear through his boots until his toes bled....:eek:
Well, "Mike the Bike" never wore them (no corner drag marks ;) ) but they are labeled "The Mike Hailwood Boot" inside. They are full length leather boots, which I bought on sale (for about 5 pounds) from Fowlers in Bristol in 1969/70. I think my principal concern then was keeping my feet warm and dry while riding through cold, wet British winters, rather than any fashion statement or pretensions to consummate riding skill. The picture below shows red rugby sock (1965 vintage but washed since) rolled over the top, with period "fag" dangling out of corner of mouth. What a poseur! :D

Bolder

P.S. Unfortunately, I never saw Hailwood race (except on TV) but one of my brothers is marshalling at the TT this week (a tribute to the famous "comeback").

 

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Discussion Starter #13
Congratulations on the purchase. The 1000S is in fact gorgeous, but I think you probably made the right choice. There is practically no limit to how the riding position of the naked version can be adjusted, if it becomes necessary. With the S you are possibly doomed to suffer for fashion.

Hope you have a ball with it. It is a sweet bike for sure.
This was my thinking, too, Yellow Duck. If I can keep riding to advanced age, all I will need are higher bars and one of those "I've fallen and I can't get up" transmitters! :cool:

Bolder
 

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Well, "Mike the Bike" never wore them (no corner drag marks ;) ) but they are labeled "The Mike Hailwood Boot" inside. They are full length leather boots, which I bought on sale (for about 5 pounds) from Fowlers in Bristol in 1969/70. I think my principal concern then was keeping my feet warm and dry while riding through cold, wet British winters, rather than any fashion statement or pretensions to consummate riding skill. The picture below shows red rugby sock (1965 vintage but washed since) rolled over the top, with period "fag" dangling out of corner of mouth. What a poseur! :D

Bolder

P.S. Unfortunately, I never saw Hailwood race (except on TV) but one of my brothers is marshalling at the TT this week (a tribute to the famous "comeback").

Great photo Bolder. I still have a pair of Ashmans boots I bought in the 70's but I don't ride in them now, like me they have seen better days!
 

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Welcome! I know you made the right decision, whichever Duc you chose.

I'm 57, and 175 lbs. The GT has been a very good choice for me, comfort wise.

I test rode Sport 1000 and thought that it was going to maim me. I just could not see that much weight on my wrists for extended periods. That said, I certainly did enjoy just looking at the bike.

Again, welcome, and please keep us posted!
 

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Bolder,since you went with no fairing, you can always put bars on it . The sky is the limit. This set up is a set of GT risers on the stock top clamp that I machined. (see photo) Or you can buy a GT top clamp. Bars are from Flanders. JS
 

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I am 54 (55 this year), and ride the '06 Sport 1000 (monoposto). That bike has lower bars than the subsequent models, because I believe the risers were standard from '07 on.

Quite candidly, at least for me, the bike is a torture rack. At 5'-7", I really need to stretch over the tank to reach the bars. However, I am always squeezing the tank with my knees, and keeping my arms bents and relaxed, so I really do not feel the weight on my wrists. What absolutely kills me though is my neck. It only feels comfortable on high freeway speeds, when the wind pushes my body more upright, allowing me to not have to lift my head quite as much.

Having said all that, I still absolutely love the bike. It is more than a bike, it is ART.

 

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Welcome

Hi another welcome, enjoy the bike - I certainly love mine. I also used to go to Brands in my youth and still do, I live in Tunbridge Wells which is just half hour from the circuit and ride my bike up there for any racing that happens to be on whether it just club stuff or better quality. If I'm not there I'll be at (let's see if you can remember these) Box Hill and from there I'll usually take the A29 Bognor road to Bury Hill - a beautiful ride through the English countryside. If the fancy takes me it's down to Rye Harbour and onto Camber and Lydd or Beachy Head, then there's the twisty bit of the A259 at Winchelsea remember any of these?

Hope you're enjoying the American dream and the fantastic wide open spaces.

Regards from Blighty
Nick:D
 

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Hey slowerthan. You are right about the neck. I'm the same age as you. but shorter, and it hurts to look up for that long. I can only put on about two of my helmet's because ,I cant see out of the others. but its all worth it if you ask me. By the way nice damper!
 
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