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Discussion Starter #1
Hey All,

Glad to be here on this thread with lots of Ducati Lovers!

I know some of you hate the design of the Streetfighter but I love it.

Does anyone have experience owning when Ducati Launches a new line? The reason I ask is that my current bike is a first of the series and I've had nothing but problems with it. I was wondering how Ducati handles issues or if they usually even have any?

:Some Backstory about me:

Initially I was going to buy a 696 last year, but the date for delivery kept getting pushed back and the Aprillia Shiver came out. I loved the way that bike looked more and it had more features for just a bit more money so I figured I would go for it!

This was a big Mistake, the Shiver has given me TONS of problems (recalls, etc.) I really wish I went with a Ducati. Aprillia also does not communicate with their dealers well. I had to argue with dealers to get them to bother Aprillia to do warranty work on the bike.

I didn't really want to move down in HP to the 696 and when I saw the Streetfighter I fell in love

So either way I'll either be on a 696 or a Streetfighter!
 

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Welcome to the site! The SF certainly has polarizing looks; I kind of like that about the certain Ducatis though. Keeps them original in my opinion. 696 or SF huh, that is quite a gap! SF makes 155 HP and is nothing to shake a stick at in comparison with a 696.

If you don't mind me asking what is your riding experience and what are you looking to do with a potential future Duc? (Say every day riding, track days, touring, yada yada).
 

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So, your problems aren't with a Ducati?

Umm, this is a Ducati forum..
Pay no attention to the noob with the smart-ass answers. ^

Your question is perfectly valid. Ducatis aren't without their issues. Search this forum for key words like "flaking rockers", "bubbling paint", "tank problems", "stalling", etc.

The list goes on. Ducati tends to be slightly better than Aprlia about addressing problems - at least, that's what I've heard - but owning a Ducati isn't a worry-free proposition by any stretch.

On the other hand, there's just something about riding these Italian bitches that makes it all worthwhile...
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the replies :)

Tyler: To be honest I find the fact of owning a liter bike kind of intimidating. The level of "go" I get out of just a small twist of the throttle now is quite a bit. This makes going over potholes, bumps, general around town driving less fun. I imagine that feeling would only be amplified in a higher cc I could be wrong.

Plus I'm worried about how much my insurance costs may jump. Right now I'm paying about $350 for the year and my current bike has a 750cc powerplant. I don't know exactly how my insurance company judges things. I know they consider some bikes "Sport Bikes" but I believe that is when they are 4 cylinder and not Twins.

Scott:

LOL at the Italian Bitches quote. My friend asked me about my current bike I said "It's like dating an Model, she looks great when you go out and it makes you look great. Then you come home and she throws up everything from your day out and goes to sleep, leaving you have to clean up the mess."

I love beautiful bikes though, Japanese bikes are great I won't knock them. But I just don't like the styling really, the B-King came kind of close but I dunno there was always something I didn't' like about it.

Thanks for the Keyword Searches, I'll check out some of those issues.

I'm not expecting a perfect experience, just to be treated like a human being at least by Ducati if not the dealership itself.

On a side note: I do appreciate the warm welcome. I tried another Ducati forum and either their user base is really low or they're all snobs. Either way I'm here to stay :)
 

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The Streetfighter is going to be a very powerful beast, so if you're not fully confident in your abilities, you'd be better off keeping the Shiver for a while longer.

That said, if you do end up with a Ducati, the biggest factor that will determine your happiness level will not be Ducati, the company, as much as it will be the dealer you choose to do business with. There are some really fantastic Ducati dealers out there - and there are some real pricks. I'm not familiar with the N.J. area, but you can ask around for advice on the best dealerships in your area. Try the North East regional forum. It's not uncommon for someone to use a dealer hundreds of miles away, in order to avoid dealing with the local A-hole dealer.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
The Streetfighter is going to be a very powerful beast, so if you're not fully confident in your abilities, you'd be better off keeping the Shiver for a while longer.
You're probably right about probably staying on my Shiver a while longer but do you think it's ability? I just want an honest opinion so feel free to be frank with me I can handle it.

I always just assumed that it was more of a preference because a lot of the places I usually go tend to have potholes or uneven roads, etc. etc. and hitting them always seems to result in me jerking the throttle a bit. I try to keep my wrist as flat as possible like they taught me in the MSF class. I assumed that happened to everyone though and some riders could just tolerate it better.

This will be my second year riding a motorcycle. I started on a Ninja 250, upgraded to the Shiver. I'm not unhappy with the performance of the bike just unhappy with the bike and dealer/manufacturer relationship.

That said, if you do end up with a Ducati, the biggest factor that will determine your happiness level will not be Ducati, the company, as much as it will be the dealer you choose to do business with. There are some really fantastic Ducati dealers out there - and there are some real pricks. I'm not familiar with the N.J. area, but you can ask around for advice on the best dealerships in your area. Try the North East regional forum. It's not uncommon for someone to use a dealer hundreds of miles away, in order to avoid dealing with the local A-hole dealer.
Well while I haven't had any service done at the local ducati dealership I have spoken to the manager on several occasions. He calls me the Shiver Guy. I like the Dealership too because it's not really that busy and it's a lot more local. I'll post in the NE forum and see what people have to say about them.
 

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The Streetfighter is going to be a very powerful beast, so if you're not fully confident in your abilities, you'd be better off keeping the Shiver for a while longer.

That said, if you do end up with a Ducati, the biggest factor that will determine your happiness level will not be Ducati, the company, as much as it will be the dealer you choose to do business with. There are some really fantastic Ducati dealers out there - and there are some real pricks. I'm not familiar with the N.J. area, but you can ask around for advice on the best dealerships in your area. Try the North East regional forum. It's not uncommon for someone to use a dealer hundreds of miles away, in order to avoid dealing with the local A-hole dealer.
+1 on the Dealer thing. My local dealer really didn't take me serious so I went about 100 miles away to a small volume/big customer appreciation dealer. I still send folks to the local dealer bearing in mind my personal experience. I still support my local dealer by visiting because he has some nice people working for him, but I won't buy any bikes unless he apologizes for his behavior...looks like the dealer 100 miles away will get a check for a Streetfighter sometime in the future.
 

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I would stay on the Shiver a bit longer, gain some more riding experience. I've been riding over 25 years and liter bikes still scare the crap out of me and have owner my share of them. I also owned an Aprilia Tuono and couldn't have been happier with it. No problems with it at all. They are a little slow with stuff, but some of that is the dealer, just like Ducati. I had good experiences with dealers and bad, nothing to do with Aprilia itself.
 

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I'd like to jump in here and say everybody is right on target with the dealer thing, some good and some bad.

As far as the streetfighter goes I think you may be a bit ahead of the curve on this one. Most of the experienced riders I've talked to who've been on the Shiver are un-impressed with the power, on the other hand a 1098 will rip your eyeballs out and I expect the same from the streetfighter - it will be a mad beast for sure.

That's not to say you couldn't ride it just fine but if you already have issues with the Shiver this may not be the smartest route for you just yet.

As other have said Ducatis are not without their problems and often have "first-release" issues with their bikes, so be aware of that going in!

This is from the Ducati Superbike forum:

A thread for those considering a Ducati, what to expect

First things first, just because they cost more $ doesn't mean they will be perfect, they are still man made and they are assembled by hand in Bologna Italy by people who live, love and breath motorcycles (Ducatis specifically). These folks do a great job, but they are not robots, they drink wine and they celebrate life. There are some Ducatis that never have a single issue, there are some that need to be dialed in. Don't fear or assume your new one will be flawed.

What about my new bike when I pick it up?

Sorry, but it won't be like a Japanese bike, those things feel ready to go at mile one. A Ducati is going to feel tight because it is, the motor won't loosen up til at least 2,500 miles and it will be a progressive seat of the pants difference, the same goes for the transmission, after a 1,000 miles or so it will settle in to being as precise as a Swiss watch and you'll notice much less driveline lash than Japanese bikes too. (they tend to start out feeling great and then once settled in feel loose and sloppy by comparison)

I just want to ride my bike and never touch it.


A Ducati might not be your best choice, become involved with your bike, you'll actually becomes more comfortable with it. It's not a bad thing to check a exhaust sniffer plug or fairing screws or heat shield screws. What many forget to mention is once a Ducati settles in, things don't continue to settle, they are good for years of riding. The second year on are usually just oil changes and riding.

But the mean man on the internet said Ducati valves had to be adjusted every ten miles.

OK so the ten is obviously not right, but what isn't said is the tolerances and the materials are very good and after the valves are done once at 7,500 miles there is a good chance they won't need to be done again for years of riding.

Why should I have to do anything but ride the bike, thats all my GSXR1ZX10RCBR asked of me?

Maybe you shouldn't buy one, try as they may, and they are much better, Ducatis will never be for "the masses", now some may view this as a negative, but the enthusiasts never give it a thought. A Ducati owner tends to be OK with being independant and being different. If you expect dirt cheap accessories, parts, spares on every corner, you will be disappointed. For some Ducati ownership is much more than they expected and will never go back (that would be me), for others they are just frustrated and probably never should have tried.
 

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HI Brackstone, I remember you from the aprilia forum. I bought a shiver, but just wasn't comfortable for me because of seat configuration. But was very impressed with it and hands down the best ape I've ever owned. I do recall you had lots of issues on your bike.

Typically, jerking the throttle over bumps is caused by too tight a grip on the throttle, the throttle by wire is especially sensitive to it IMHO.

I'd get an estimate on the insurance for the streetfighter, in it's favor it's not really a pure sportbike so might class out a abit lower than a 1098. But getting a rough estimate from an insurer. I think to get a good idea of what the premiums would be ask them for a quote on the mv agusta brutale 910R similar type of bike, power and class.

Chris

You're probably right about probably staying on my Shiver a while longer but do you think it's ability? I just want an honest opinion so feel free to be frank with me I can handle it.

I always just assumed that it was more of a preference because a lot of the places I usually go tend to have potholes or uneven roads, etc. etc. and hitting them always seems to result in me jerking the throttle a bit. I try to keep my wrist as flat as possible like they taught me in the MSF class. I assumed that happened to everyone though and some riders could just tolerate it better.

This will be my second year riding a motorcycle. I started on a Ninja 250, upgraded to the Shiver. I'm not unhappy with the performance of the bike just unhappy with the bike and dealer/manufacturer relationship.



Well while I haven't had any service done at the local ducati dealership I have spoken to the manager on several occasions. He calls me the Shiver Guy. I like the Dealership too because it's not really that busy and it's a lot more local. I'll post in the NE forum and see what people have to say about them.
 

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All good comments above, especially consider flyn and AZ Scott's comments.

As is always the case with any new machine, most people are lucky but a few defects and shortcomings slip through the cracks..... and this is true whatever brand you buy. The cheapest insurance against troubles is to buy from the most reputable dealer you can, even if you have to travel a few hours to do so.

Ducati owners tend to develop a more intimate relationship with their machines partly from necessity and partly because of how they make us feel. Bottom line is that it is a more rewarding ownership experience in the long run even with the odd problem.
Remember many of the old Ducatis are as temperamental as a (XXXXX hot latin female analogy deleted here ..ooops! :eek:XXXXX) but when running hot and strong man oh man you just cannot beat them, they give you goose bumps where you never had them before.... I better stop here.
No offense intended to any party.:)
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Hey Zvez! I remember you too :)

So you are making the switch to the Streetfighter as well? What made you want the streetfighter, if you don't mind me asking?

Ducnut: I hear that, that's why I asked about dealers too. The dealership I work with now is nice, but Aprilia's lousy communications still makes it unbearable.

I really appreciates everyone's warm welcome and advice. It's really nice to find a good community like this.
 

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As you may recall, from an old injury the particular seat config on the shiver wouldn't work for me, found this out after I bought as no demo rider was available at the time. So sold it probably 4 months after I bought it. A great bike for me and as said probably the best aprilia yet, tho am aware have been some issues on the shiver as a whole.

I'm still keeping the tuono and brutale (the used market on these is so abysmal, not worth selling). But I would like a new bike and really like the whole design of the streetfighter. I've been wanting another duc and considered another monster but when my dealer told me the SF was on the horizon I waited until pics came out, then put a deposit down. I actually prefer the riding position of a naked bike for me. And I like the overall package of the SF.

Chris

Hey Zvez! I remember you too :)

So you are making the switch to the Streetfighter as well? What made you want the streetfighter, if you don't mind me asking?

Ducnut: I hear that, that's why I asked about dealers too. The dealership I work with now is nice, but Aprilia's lousy communications still makes it unbearable.

I really appreciates everyone's warm welcome and advice. It's really nice to find a good community like this.
 

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You're probably right about probably staying on my Shiver a while longer but do you think it's ability? I just want an honest opinion so feel free to be frank with me I can handle it.
How many miles do you have on the Shiver? It takes a lot of miles for me to get really comfortable on a new motorcycle. It sounds like you are still skill building and learning to ride the Shiver. It also may be a little "sharp edged" for your riding skill level right now to be truly comfortable for you.
 

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...The level of "go" I get out of just a small twist of the throttle now is quite a bit. This makes going over potholes, bumps, general around town driving less fun...
One simple and easy solution you can try: Stickier grips! There are some super-sticky dual-density gel grips out there, such as those from Pro-Grip, that can keep the throttle from slipping under your glove when you hit those chatter bumps. I have the same problem on the Hyper on occasion, and I may do the same...
 

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Discussion Starter #17
How many miles do you have on the Shiver? It takes a lot of miles for me to get really comfortable on a new motorcycle. It sounds like you are still skill building and learning to ride the Shiver. It also may be a little "sharp edged" for your riding skill level right now to be truly comfortable for you.
I'm over 4,000 now, I put 3,000 on my first bike.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
One simple and easy solution you can try: Stickier grips! There are some super-sticky dual-density gel grips out there, such as those from Pro-Grip, that can keep the throttle from slipping under your glove when you hit those chatter bumps. I have the same problem on the Hyper on occasion, and I may do the same...
I'll have to look at these.

I appreciate all of the advice and insight!
 

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Discussion Starter #19
As you may recall, from an old injury the particular seat config on the shiver wouldn't work for me, found this out after I bought as no demo rider was available at the time. So sold it probably 4 months after I bought it. A great bike for me and as said probably the best aprilia yet, tho am aware have been some issues on the shiver as a whole.

I'm still keeping the tuono and brutale (the used market on these is so abysmal, not worth selling). But I would like a new bike and really like the whole design of the streetfighter. I've been wanting another duc and considered another monster but when my dealer told me the SF was on the horizon I waited until pics came out, then put a deposit down. I actually prefer the riding position of a naked bike for me. And I like the overall package of the SF.

Chris
Oh yeah I totally remember the seat thing, that is one thing I do disklike strongly about the shiver, and (again) there are no aftermarket seats for it really you have to go to some guy who custom makes you a gel.

I love naked riding positions too, sports just don't feel natural for me.
 
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