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Hello everyone, I will be removing my wheels to do a tire change and rear brakes this weekend, seems very straight foward. I wanted to know what tools i will need and what size sockets i will need( i believe its 28mm and 41mm) any advice will be great.
Thanks
01 748
 

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Hello edwyun, Sorry for the confusion i am not changing the tires myself i will be taking them to a shop, i just wanted to know what the correct size of the front and rear nuts are on a 01 748 to remove the wheels.
Thanks
 

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the rear is a 46mm IIRC... the 41mm is the sprocket side and doesn't need to be touched for rear wheel removal.

I don't remember what the front is...
 

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46mm? what is that coverted, 41mm is 1 5/8 right?
 

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RocketJohn said:
46mm = 1 13/16"
41mm = 1 5/8"
Most Sears stores will stock these sockets but not in the metric.
They wil most likely be in 3/4" drive.
 

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You can buy a complete set of large Metric sockets at Harbor Freight for what it costs to buy a single large socket at your local hardware store. They are currently on sale for about $37 dollars. The 21 piece metric set (3/4" drive) includes the following socket sizes:

* Size range: 19, 22, 24, 26, 27, 28, 30, 32, 34, 36, 38, 41, 42, 45, 46, 48 and 50mm.

Harbor Freight Metric Socket Set

I wrote something a while back about installing front and rear wheels on an ST series bikes. I will try to find it and post it here. Removing and installing the rear wheel on the 748/9*6 series is very simple just loosen the 46mm socket and remove the wheel. Just make sure you remove the cone spacer and the washer and remeber how they go on.

-Fariborz
 

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For removing the front wheel, it is best to support both the front-end and rear using a stand. The best way of supporting the front-end is have a stand that supports the bike from under the triple tree. This will give you better access to the axle and the mounting bolts. But you can still do it if your front stand supports the bike by lifting the fork legs from the bottom.

To remove the front wheel, first loosen the caliper mounting bolts and remove the calipers from the wheel. You might need to push the caliper pistons in by cocking the calipers to get them off the bike. Next loosen the front axle nut. Now loosen the two bottom pinch bolts on each side. It is important that you use the 1-2-1 approach and do it gradually. That means to loosen one bolt just slightly and then move to the next bolt. Loosen that bolt slightly and go back to the first bolt. Repeat this until both bolts are loose. Then move to the other side. Once all the pinch bolts are loose you can then push the axle out from the left side of the bike.

Use a wood or aluminum drift and a hammer to push the axle out. I have an old aluminum handle bar and a piece of a broom stick for this. Do not use a steel drift, you will damage the axle. Slowly push the axle out until it comes out of the right side. The wheel would slide right out once the axle is out.

To reinstall the wheel, you might need a special tool to align the axle holes with the holes on the bottom of your fork legs. You might actually have that tool in your tool bag. It looks like a socket head with a pin going through it. On one side that pin sticks out a little more than the other side. My 748's tool bag came with one of those but the ST4 did not. I am not sure if the previous owner of the ST4 had lost it or the bike simply did not come with it. The front axle has a hole through it that allows for access to the compression damping screw on the fork that is accessible from the bottom of the fork leg. The pin in the axle tool just holds the hole in the axle and fork-bottom lined up while you are tightening the axle nut. If you are not touching the compression damping, it is not critical to have these holes lined up!

If you do not have that tool you can use a large Allen wrench big enough to fill that cavity from the side. Do not use a small one. It will get wedged in that hole and will damage the fork bottom. If you do not have an Allen wrench, you can use a screwdriver and place it in the hole from the bottom of the fork leg!

When installing the front wheel, put anti-seize or grease on the axle and then insert it from the right side of the bike. Make sure that the speedo metal ring is in the wheel well before putting the wheel on the bike. It is not uncommon for this ring to fall off when installing a new tire. I once had that ring lost at a shop when they changed my tire. The same shop also damaged my rim. That is when I started doing my own tire changes! Anyway, the speedo ring has a tang that needs to line up with a cavity on the speedo drive unit.

To avoid damaging the thin-walled axle, tap it in gently with a --rubber-- mallet and rotate it using the special tool or a screwdriver in the axle hole. When the axle gets to the other side, you need to line up the axle, the wheel, the speedo unit and the left side fork bottom before the axle can be pushed in. If the axle is not going in, do --NOT-- start banging hard at the axle with the mallet. You will damage the other end. When things are lined up, the axle will go in with little effort. Make sure you line up the speedo unit properly so that the speedo cable is not coming out at a weird angle. The cable should come up straight between the fork and the left-hand caliper. Also make sure that the tang on the speedo ring lines up with the cavity on the speedo before you start tightening the nut. You can damage that ring! If the tang is not lined up, spin the wheel slightly while holding the speedo with one hand. Speedo should sit flush with the wheel.

Once the axle is in, I put on the axle nut and just hand tighten it and then I typically put the calipers back on the wheel. This will let me line up the speedo cable properly before starting to tightening the axle bolt to spec. If the pads are too close together, you might have some problem putting the calipers over the disks. I typically use a WIDE Flathead screw driver or a WIDE painter knife/scraper to move the pads further apart. I make sure that I do not damage the pads while doing this. Once the calipers are over the disks, I then put the caliper mounting bolts on and torque them to 43 Nm. Use a 1-2-1 approach when tightening these bolts. This means tighten one bolt a little bit then move to the next bolt. Do this back and forth until both bolts are torqued to the specification.

Once the calipers are on the bike, line up the holes in the axle with the holes in the bottom of the fork legs so that the through-holes allow a screwdriver to access the compression valve adjusters. The common mistake made here is to just tighten everything up at this point. Instead, here’s the proper sequence to assure that the forks are aligned.

Make sure that the speedo cable is pointing up and the cable goes up parallel to the fork between the fork and the left caliper before start tightening the nut. While holding the axle with the axle tool or the screwdriver to line up the hole, start tightening the axle nut. This will start pulling the axle toward the nut and forces the little flange on the axle to sit against a lip in the right fork bottom. When you start feeling pressure against the axle nut it means that the flange is resting against the lip. Now stop and temporarily tighten-up the two RIGHT side axle clamp bolts. You do not need to tighten these bolts too much (less than 19 Nm), just enough that they prevent the axle from turning. Also do not tighten one bolt all the way and then the other one. Use the 1-2-1 approach and tighten the bolts a small amount at a time.

Now start tightening the axle nut and torqued it to 63 Nm.

Then torque the two LEFT side clamp bolts next to the axle nut. Again use the 1-2-1 approach and tighten each pinch bolt a small amount at a time until they are torqued properly. The pinch bolts should be torqued to 19 Nm. Then, loosen the two RIGHT side pinch bolts.

Take the bike off the stand. Pump the front brake few times until the pads start grabbing the front disk. Then bounce the suspension up and down till you are sure that the right side fork has moved to the proper (neutral) position along the axle. (It makes it easier to compress the suspension if you hold the front brake on when rocking the bike forward.)

Once this is done, torque the two RIGHT side clamp bolts, using the same 1-2-1 approach to 19 Nm.

---Go over everything one MORE time to make sure you have NOT MISSED anything.---

The most important issues to remember while doing this are:

1) Be particularly careful when you tighten the pinch bolts. The Ducati axle is really thin-walled so it will ovalize if the bolts are over-torqued. Always use a 1-2-1 tightening approach when tightening the pinch bolts and ALWAYS only tighten a small amount at a time. Do NOT torque them over 19 Nm.

2) Grease the axle before installation.

3) Make sure the Speedo ring is there and lined up with the speedo drive. I always clean and grease the speedo drive! You should note that any extra grease would spill out of the speedo when one rides the bike at speed. This grease can get on the left disk! It is important NOT to over grease the drive. I always take the bike for a test ride after I put the wheels back on the bike and clean up the grease before it starts getting on the friction surface of the brakes and before I go for a long ride.

4) Make sure your caliper bolts are torqued properly. Loose calipers is not good for your health or wallet. Again use the 1-2-1 approach.

5) Pump the front brake few times to make sure it is working before you go for a ride.

I also bleed the brakes when I change my tires. It gives me a piece of mind.

-Fariborz
 

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Thanks guys, i jsut bought the 41mm sprocket and will go buy the 46mm one. Funny thing happen to me, i'm sure it happend to you guys, i asked for the 41mm and he said "what", then i said 1 5/8 and they said ok. LOL..
 

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1 5/8!!? Sorry, I must not be able to speak, "English" lol. Metric system FTW!!!

I'm proud to say I don't own a single "standard" tool, except for maybe a freebee spark plug socket. :D
 

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Make sure that the speedo metal ring is in the wheel well before putting the wheel on the bike. It is not uncommon for this ring to fall off when installing a new tire. I once had that ring lost at a shop when they changed my tire. The same shop also damaged my rim. That is when I started doing my own tire changes! Anyway, the speedo ring has a tang that needs to line up with a cavity on the speedo drive unit.
...hmmm, am i missing something, or good to go?
Pics show what I have. speedo pickup looks somewhat "open" because I can see inside. Is there supposed to be something else involved here? (other than the wheel, of course...)

While we are at it - that plastic looks awful, even melted maybe? is there supposed to be some kind of grease inside? Mine is mostly dry up in where cog is inside there.
 

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