Ducati.ms - The Ultimate Ducati Forum banner
  • Hey Everyone! Enter your bike HERE to be a part of this months Bike of the Month Challenge!

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all new to the forum. I have only been riding a few months. Took the course got the endorsement, etc. I then bought an R3 (ok but kinda weak) together with an R6 (a little scarier). I then walked into the Ducati Dealership where a 2018 1299 Panigale R FE was sitting and fell in love. Needless to say, I had no business getting this bike but got it anyway (I know famous last words for a newbie). I rode it around the block in "WET" mode and almost shit my pants!! This angry monster is no joke! I think I would like to "store" this thing in my living room or office on display until I have more experience with the R3/R6. What do you guys think? Will it hurt the bike to be stored indoors with weekly or biweekly startups on a rear paddock and tender? Any thoughts?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,280 Posts
Ride the R3 until you are fully confident with it.
Then move on the to R6, keep the R3 if you like, why not.

If you can return the Panigale to the dealer, do it!
Or, I'm sure you will have plenty of offers to exercise it on your behalf. >:)

For motivation (or not) look at used prices for the Panigale, even with low low miles. Realize you will make someone real happy when you eat depreciation on sale. So, keep it! :x
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
247 Posts
Ride the R3 until you are fully confident with it.
Then move on the to R6, keep the R3 if you like, why not.

If you can return the Panigale to the dealer, do it!
Or, I'm sure you will have plenty of offers to exercise it on your behalf. >:)

For motivation (or not) look at used prices for the Panigale, even with low low miles. Realize you will make someone real happy when you eat depreciation on sale. So, keep it! :x
First off congrats and welcome. I also Totally agree with all of the above. I can relate to the powerful emotional pull of a sexy beast such as the R and it’s beautiful livery of an FE. Still a beast underneath all that and I worry about your lack of riding experience trying to handle such a handful.

I had a ‘13 Panigale R and sold it, that beast belongs on the track and I no longer had time to track it. Street riding was fun at first but after the novelty wore off I couldn’t wait to get back on my other bikes. Every stoplight became excruciating from the heat and even on the freeway it felt like doing a big disservice to the bike. The track is where it belongs.

Since you have the financial means to get the R why not invest in track lessons?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
433 Posts
Hmm, I think he's just asking if he can keep it in his living room.

I think you can keep it parked. Lots of folks who live in places not as nice as Malibu keep their bikes parked all winter. Tender, gas stabilizer, front and rear paddock should do the trick. I'd also clean it from time to time... and ride it from time to time when traffic is low (sunday am etc.). It will build up your confidence.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Great advice guys. I know its a dumb purchase at this point but I absolutely love the way this thing looks (FE). Wanted to buy a "new" one to "save" for when I get better, and didn't want to end up buying used years later. I am a professional racer in the Porsche GT3 series so I'm used to going balls out in a car at the racetrack and have raced all the major circuits in the world. I think motorcycle race lessons would be great. Which school do you all recommend out here in SoCal for a relatively new rider?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,280 Posts
ride it from time to time when traffic is low (sunday am etc.).
Weekends are zoo time in Malibu and the canyons above. Every squid and their girlfriend is out, along with a full contingent of cops, both Sheriff and CHP. Best to ride there on a weekday if you can. :smile2:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
247 Posts
Great advice guys. I know its a dumb purchase at this point but I absolutely love the way this thing looks (FE). Wanted to buy a "new" one to "save" for when I get better, and didn't want to end up buying used years later. I am a professional racer in the Porsche GT3 series so I'm used to going balls out in a car at the racetrack and have raced all the major circuits in the world. I think motorcycle race lessons would be great. Which school do you all recommend out here in SoCal for a relatively new rider?
I highly recommend Jason Pridmore’s Star motorcycle school.
Homepage - JP43 Training

Also, meaning no disrespect, but racing on four wheels is no comparison to two wheels. Be carefu, respect the bike.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
160 Posts
Hell of a bike you bought! I get it though that thing is sexy as it gets. I come from an autoracing background as well, Formula Contental and Formula Atlantic's. First thing you'll notice is that taking an auto racing line will be your first instinct and you'll find yourself turning in to early. Bikes (for the most part) like a later turn in as they get to the apex faster. This took me some adjustment time. Also mistakes are more costly and I don't mean money wise.

I'm taking a Superbike school this spring, there is much to learn. I'm just over the hill from you BTW in Thousand Oaks if you ever want to meet up hit me up!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
534 Posts
My first street bike was a Ninja ZX-6R, everyone told me I was crazy to get something like that as my first bike. But I'm not an idiot and I respect the bikes ability to kill me almost instantly. I never had a problem, 10+ years later I have the same respect and have yet to be killed or injured on a motorcycle on the street.

The only "crash" i had was due to massive rear wheel hop when I got my first ever V-twin, a Monster. No slipper, not used to so much engine braking. Ended up leaning against a hill and had a bent lever, no huge deal.

All that being said. I also owned a 999 and an RSV-4 Factory and I can honestly stay don't know if I EVER opened the throttle fully, at least not in 1st or 2nd gear.

Just use common sense, and enjoy your toys. I would spend some time on the PCH up there before I tried to set any lap records on Latigo Canyon or something. The far end of Mullholland up by Neptunes Net is pretty chill, you probably know all that already.

GOOD LUCK...the FE is in your hands, remember we just borrow these bikes..:)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
876 Posts
Running the bike for less than 15-20 minutes will simply bring condensation moisture into the engine, increasing corrosion. You would be better off to take a 20 minute ride monthly or bi-monthly than just starting it. You don't have to twist the throttle. If you are not going to ride it for a prolonged period, remove the fuel and run it dry, then fog it for storage. I don't keep fuel containers inside my home, but to each his own.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,322 Posts
Hi all new to the forum. I have only been riding a few months. Took the course got the endorsement, etc. I then bought an R3 (ok but kinda weak) together with an R6 (a little scarier). I then walked into the Ducati Dealership where a 2018 1299 Panigale R FE was sitting and fell in love. Needless to say, I had no business getting this bike but got it anyway (I know famous last words for a newbie). I rode it around the block in "WET" mode and almost shit my pants!! This angry monster is no joke! I think I would like to "store" this thing in my living room or office on display until I have more experience with the R3/R6. What do you guys think? Will it hurt the bike to be stored indoors with weekly or biweekly startups on a rear paddock and tender? Any thoughts?
Welcome to the club Newbie,,, aka fresh meat. :)

why not invest in track lessons?
Best advice so far, and imo a requisite before buying any bike.

I think motorcycle race lessons would be great. Which school do you all recommend out here in SoCal for a relatively new rider?
Glad to hear your open to suggestions. There's a few out there. The focus of the schools vary; Reg Pridmore's Class is a great place to start. I haven't taken his son's course,,, the apple doesn't fall too far from the tree.

Running the bike for less than 15-20 minutes will simply bring condensation moisture into the engine, increasing corrosion. You would be better off to take a 20 minute ride monthly or bi-monthly than just starting it. You don't have to twist the throttle. If you are not going to ride it for a prolonged period, remove the fuel and run it dry, then fog it for storage. I don't keep fuel containers inside my home, but to each his own.
Fyi; Bimonthly means twice a month. :nerd: Most ppl get paid every two weeks, that would be bimonthly, not biweekly. Biweekly is twice a week.

I will echo what another member here said; if you're not going to track the 1299, it's an aweful streetbike. Ride it on the street for as long as you can, and then turn it into a track bike. Although a bike that capable/powerful will cause you to not grow (your riding skills) as quickly as you would on the R3.

For the hills of Malibu I would pick Hyper (if we're staying in the Ducati family) all day over the 1299.
 

·
Bon Vivant
Joined
·
11,335 Posts
IMO the Pani R FE belongs in one of two places - on the track, or in a museum - and nothing in between. That thing is chock full of exotic and expensive go-fast parts and it was in no way compromised for street use. It is a horrible everyday bike and even worse in places where there's a lot of traffic or stop and go - the bike is designed to go 180mph not sit at a light. It's just not a bike for the average Joe and it certainly is no place for a new rider.

Drain the fluids - all of them, and put it in your living room. Spend about 3 years taking track lessons before you ever bring it to the track. Its a spectacular bike but it's too much for most - even most experienced riders.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
53 Posts
I bought my 2002 Moto Guzzi V11 Scura in 2013 with 185 miles on it - for about half the price of when it sold new. I thank the previous owner for properly storing it in his home as art all that time. Perhaps this is your path too... but maybe your bike will appreciate in value like the Sport Classics did. If you want to store it, do some searches on how to prepare a motorcycle for long-term storage or display.

And I'll add one more voice to the idea of taking lessons and starting with the smaller bikes. If you learn on a bike without all the technical wizardry, you will appreciate later what those features do for you. If you learn on a bike with all the extra features (like traction control and ABS) you could get yourself in trouble the first time you ride a bike without those features - because sophisticated bike does the thinking for you and you will never learn where the limits are. Alternatively, after riding the smaller bikes for a while, you might decide that you prefer the direct connection to the machine and you don't want a bike that does the thinking for you.

I don't have a lot of experience with the modern features, but I rode a friend's BMW S1000RR recently. It's a truly amazing machine, but it's not a great everyday street bike and I'd rather ride one of my Moto Guzzis or my ST3.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,952 Posts
So I'll offer a different perspective. The 1299 is not designed to be a street bike for sure, but you can use electronics to customize the ride modes. For fun I once set the "race" mode to engine = "low' which limits the influence of ABS, TC etc...but w/ the engine setting set to low it's pretty tame. You can also reduce the engine braking to a minimum as well. I think this bike is easier to ride than my 999 was. (I admit neither is a learner bike)

So it possible to tame this bike for regular street riding even if it's less than perfect for that application.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top