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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys.
My startermotor has given up on me after trying to start my bike, after having high compression pistons mounted.
Battery is new, motobatt 16 au, with 230 cca.

Do i need a extra powerfull startermotor or is original strong enough?
At electrexworld.uk i see one for a fair price.

Do you guys with highcomps had similar issues?
 

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I thought my starter had gone too but at a suggestion from a forum member I carefully removed the end cap to see that one of the commutator brushes wire had come loose. A bit of clean up, quick drop of solder and was good as new. Now I have a new starter sitting on my shelf for the day when it finally gives up for good.
 

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I have been Running lots of race compression (higher than pump gas capable) motors 2-valve and 4-valve both at the dealership as well as on my own for the last 10 years I have never changed a starter for performance reasons. Stock starters are fine if everything else is fine. If your starter is not do as rockAz did and inspect brushes and seals for problems but if the starter worked before you did motor work it is unlikely due to the starter motor.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks guys i was gonna inspect it anyway yes.
Be4 the high comps the engine cranked only just hard enough. But never wax a problem, i accused the old battery.

Now with the high comps snd new battery its when the problems occur. My gues, the starter was allready pretty much at the end of its life, and the high comps gave the last deadly blow.

Ill inspect now first, and who knows i can repair it. Atleast i know that oem or equivalent is fine. Thanks! 👍
 

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Maybe installing a high-cap starter wire kit will help?

I don't run high comp pistons but I made a 25mm² starter kit with Klauke lugs (or better; had it made by a tech guy at work) and that made a big difference in starting the bike.

Now I got instant response from the starter when I push the start button.

Not sure if that enhances the lifespan of a startermotor but if it doesn't work, it doesn't hurt I suppose...
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Belgianduke you are right. I will install bigger cables later on. But that wasnt the problem today. Even with serious starter cables, directly to the startter motor it still didnt crank hard enough.

Have the cap off now. I brush is totally gone and some debree in there.
Think ill buy a complete new one so i can ride, and next winter check if this old one is still salvagable.
👍
 

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Belgianduke you are right. I will install bigger cables later on. But that wasnt the problem today. Even with serious starter cables, directly to the startter motor it still didnt crank hard enough.
If you're starter motor is broken, bigger cables will of course not fix that but they might help to prevent problems in the future with your new starter motor.
 

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These guys make nice stuff for re-cabling using million strand wire

https://motolectric.com/makes/ducati.html
Welding cable works great for this application. It too, is high strand count copper.

While I totally understand that not everyone is capable (or willing) to make their own cables, and these kits are just the right kind of solution for them ... $120+ bucks is a lot of money for three lengths of cable w/terminations, a few zip ties, a little bit of heat shrink tubing, and an alcohol swab.

As far as the trick cable in those kits, it all comes down to pounds-per-foot of copper. All that high strand count provides is more copper per foot in a smaller diameter cable, and increased flexibility. If one wishes to DIY this, as I mentioned, welding cable is an excellent substitute. There's actually only about $15 bucks worth of components in those cable kits. I can offer assistance for making a solid crimp on the copper eyelets if anyone wants to look into the DIY solution. Send me a private message if you need help with how to crimp those copper eyelets. I'd be happy to help.

Another thing that may help is stuff known as "gas tight paste" which is impregnated with metal crystals (zinc). The metal crystals cut through the mico-thin layer of oxidation on the eyelets and the terminal posts that forms in less than a few milliseconds after the surface(s) are machined/sanded/brushed/whatever clean. The crystals cut through that layer of oxidation, then the "gas tight" substrate seals the connection from air/oxygen to prevent oxidation from creating resistance (which increases load on the battery, and decreases voltage to the starter). When voltage goes down, current goes up. And when that happens, windings on the starter's armature and stator are carrying more current than they were designed to, leading to component failure.

I build modular synthesizers, I hand make bus bars and power cables in the custom power distribution system. And as you may have guessed, I use gas tight paste on all of the DC connections and terminations. Modular synths are highly sensitive to voltage drop and voltage differences from one end of the distribution to the power supply. Using the methods I've described reduces those issues to near null.

So even if your starter is working ok for now, uprating to cables with more copper per foot is a solid preventive measure.

If you're starter motor is broken, bigger cables will of course not fix that but they might help to prevent problems in the future with your new starter motor.
That's a fact, Jack!

"Why is there never enough time to do it right, but always enough time to do it over?"

Yeeeyup.

:smile2:
 
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