Ducati.ms - The Ultimate Ducati Forum banner
  • Hey Everyone! Enter your bike HERE to be a part of this months Bike of the Month Challenge!
1 - 20 of 35 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
202 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello All.

I'm a new '06 ST3s owner but not new to bikes. Four years ago I bought an '82 Suzuki GS1100L, took it down to the frame and rebuilt it. That bike is fun, but it's time for something a bit sportier. Sport touring fits my riding style and I've always loved the looks of the ST.

About the bike, it's a Black 06 ST3s with 6k on it. It has the DP exhaust kit, heli bar risers, sargent seat & full panniers (including the rear).

So far I've acquired LT's manual and a pdf of the service manual and have read through the halls of wisdom.

I talked to the dealership and they didn't have a record of a valve adjust being done on it, so that's first on my list. I figure that while I'm in there I'd change out the belts as well. It looks to me that the best option for me is to rent a kit from Ducatitools and follow LT's advice. At least then I know that I'll have everything that I need. Is that a bad idea?

I also plan on replacing the fuel filter and doing an oil change. I'm a mobile 1 guy so I'm going with the 15w-50.

Where should I source parts? I'm not time sensitive so is there an online place that offers a discount on OEM parts?

The big question in my mind right now is, is there anything that I should do that's not obvious? Things like battery cable upgrade, fuel line replacement, rubber seal problems, etc? I like to be proactive and fix problem areas before they become a problem.

Thanks in advance,

Rob
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
686 Posts
I would get the front suspension sorted professionally, the fork internals are old fashioned and not very good. Make sure you spray all the electrical contacts and plugs with ACF50. Set TPS and throttle balance. Pull brakes, clean and put in new fluid. Do the same for the clutch. Wheel bearings and head races should be checked. Sometimes the discs can warp or the disc spacers seize. Apart from that it should be good to go. Apart from the things you have mentioned and the general strip and clean I can't see the bike needing much at all. The ST3 is in VFR territory for reliability.


Sent from my iPhone using Motorcycle.com Free App
 

·
The days are getting longer!
Joined
·
8,278 Posts
If you are replacing the fuel filter, I would replace the fuel lines at the same time.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,510 Posts
Welcome Rob!

I acquired my ST3 with about the same milage as yours. During that first season I changed out all the fluids, installed new tires, adjusted the valves and replaced the belts. I liked the peace of mind that I was starting "fresh." One thing I didn't do (but should have) was replace the fuel filter (I saved that for too long). If you're in the tank, you might as well replace the fuel line too. I got the high pressure submersible line at NAPA. My old line looked fine, no sign of deterioration. Just make sure to get NAPA's hose clamps for fuel injection lines...they are superior to the normal band clamp.

I haven't done the upgrade to the wires, but my bike fires up fast.

I get belts, shims and tools from LT. He's a fantastic dealer...relevant parts, super fast service, willing to help. If you need OEM parts and are too far from a dealer, try Ducati of Omaha. They have a huge inventory of parts and they ship fast too! Also check the sticky in this forum...alternative parts. Lot's of great info there.

One thing to watch for is premature wear on the exhaust valve guides. The metallurgy was suspect so a number of replacements had to be made on many of the dual spark engines. That's my project for this winter...I'm going to pull the heads off and send them out to get some new guides.

Good luck!
 

·
Member
Joined
·
7,733 Posts
Some more tips

#1: Check your engine mounting bolts for proper torque setting both front and rear, *right now.*

#2: Get prepared to deal with the ordeal of removing and replacing the body panels. It's best to start at the bottom and then the top and then mid panel when removing, and starting at the mid panel and then going to the top and finally the bottom when replacing, remembering to refit all parts loosely at first and then snug up. If you're going to R&R the panels, don't do it when you're short on time. :)

#3: Pay attention to your chain tensioning adjuster bolts before a ride as they tend to back out and that could result in the adjuster snapping or the plate turning into the rear sprocket. Some riders add a smear of silicone to the back side of the bolt, others safety wire them down, I like to torque the grease free bolts down and mark a dab of paint at the top and check for movement before each ride.

#4: When refitting the rear wheel, makes sure *all* contacting surfaces are free of grease and that includes inside the SW box section, axle adjusters etc. Add a little grease only to the axle nut threads and a light smear on the axle shaft.

#5: The bike sounds well sorted, with some nice add-ons but check to see if it has a case saver behind the front sprocket cover. If not, get one.

#6: If the tires are new, raise the rear ride height so there's between 5-10 MM's between the tire and the ground when on a flat surface if the PO didn't already raise it. If you do need to raise it, dial out some compression and preload, dial in some rebound. Retension/align the chain a little on the loose side.

#7: When disconnecting the fan motor from the loom, the white connector tab does not compress, it slides under the retaining flange, pry the flange up while pulling the connector apart.

#8: When refitting the air box, get a longer front bolt and add a spacer, (some steel brake line maybe) so the head is accessible below the frame that way you'll be able to remove and replace it much more easily next time you remove the air box.

#9: When refitting the oil sump screen, make sure it's torqued down well so it won't back out because if it does, it will block an oil galley with very bad results.

#10. Make sure the front axle is aligned so you can access the compression adjuster: there are notches in the fork and axle that align.

#11: There are several ways of aligning the chain. I sue a vernier caliper pinching the gap between the inside of the hollow axle and the adjuster plate on top of the adjuster nuts. When both sides are equal, the chain is aligned. YMMV.

#12: Don't be alarmed at the wooden feel of the rear brake. Use it every rise. I sometimes use it exclusively in controlled braking situations. It will bed in over time and get much better re feel and binding power. Many ST riders prefer that type of braking action as it's purt near impossible to lock it up unless your standing on the lever.

#13: You may experience a front brake shudder/judder. There are many thoughts as to the causes, cures and preventions. Search the threads and read for yourself. I, personally, have come to the conclusion that in my case, it was the rotors buttons, not warped discs, that caused it, and once I loosened them up, it was the final step of alleviating the judders having previously swapped brake pad. YMMV.

It sounds like you have a nicely sorted bike. Enjoy the shit out of it. :)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
202 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
I would get the front suspension sorted professionally, the fork internals are old fashioned and not very good. Make sure you spray all the electrical contacts and plugs with ACF50. Set TPS and throttle balance. Pull brakes, clean and put in new fluid. Do the same for the clutch. Wheel bearings and head races should be checked. Sometimes the discs can warp or the disc spacers seize. Apart from that it should be good to go. Apart from the things you have mentioned and the general strip and clean I can't see the bike needing much at all. The ST3 is in VFR territory for reliability.
I never thought about the front suspension. I'm not what anyone would consider a spirited rider. Would I notice the difference?

I forgot to mention that, for purely cosmetic reasons, I'm planning on having the wheels and shock coil powder coated red. Is having the suspension fixed a matter of mailing the forks to someone? If so, I could easily fit that in I think. I don't even any special tools for just removing the forks, right?

Yep, was planning on inspecting, contact cleaner (I've had good results with Deoxit) and dielectric grease on all of the connectors during the deep clean.

I'll have to research the TPS but I do have a 4 port Morgan CarbTune that I could use to check throttle-body sync. Another thing that I forgot to mention is that I'm lucky enough to have a dealership fairly close by that has a performance shop and a dyno. I figured that was my last stop before the season starts and let them do a final tune/ecu flash. I figure that it won't hurt having them eyeball my bike too.

Brakes are straight-forward but I do have a question about grease. The workshop manual lists all of the lubricants as Shell Unobtainium. Is there a reference around that lists good replacements that can actually be bought in the US?

As for the clutch, steering head and rotors, I'll have to research those as well. Thanks for pointing those out.

Rob
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
202 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
If you are replacing the fuel filter, I would replace the fuel lines at the same time.
Internal, external or both? It really looks to me that I'm going to need to remove the external fuel lines to be able to get to the belts properly. So, while they're off, I might as well replace if necessary. I keep reading bad things about the clamps. Is it a good idea to try and replace them all?

Thanks,

Rob
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
202 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Welcome Rob!

I acquired my ST3 with about the same milage as yours. During that first season I changed out all the fluids, installed new tires, adjusted the valves and replaced the belts. I liked the peace of mind that I was starting "fresh." One thing I didn't do (but should have) was replace the fuel filter (I saved that for too long). If you're in the tank, you might as well replace the fuel line too. I got the high pressure submersible line at NAPA. My old line looked fine, no sign of deterioration. Just make sure to get NAPA's hose clamps for fuel injection lines...they are superior to the normal band clamp.

I haven't done the upgrade to the wires, but my bike fires up fast.

I get belts, shims and tools from LT. He's a fantastic dealer...relevant parts, super fast service, willing to help. If you need OEM parts and are too far from a dealer, try Ducati of Omaha. They have a huge inventory of parts and they ship fast too! Also check the sticky in this forum...alternative parts. Lot's of great info there.

One thing to watch for is premature wear on the exhaust valve guides. The metallurgy was suspect so a number of replacements had to be made on many of the dual spark engines. That's my project for this winter...I'm going to pull the heads off and send them out to get some new guides.

Good luck!
I hadn't thought about the coolant. Is there a consensus on an easily sourced brand? I could see the need to be able to find it when I'm out in the country.

I've got a napa near by, so I might as well get my order ready for them. It's 5/16 FI submersible and appropriate clamps, right? Happen to know how many feet I need? LT mentioned their chain lube. I'll need grease and loctite too. Are they a good source for it?

I just went out to the garage where it's 30 degrees and it fired up on the fourth crank on what appears to be the stock battery. I don't think that I have an issue there but a seven year-old battery might get replaced just because.

I thought that Desmotimes was temporarily shut down because of a deployment. At least that's what the website says. I bought his manual through ducatitools. I'm going to need some OEM parts no matter what, so is there a discount OEM reseller out there?

Yikes, pulling the heads. I'll have to research how to check those guides. Are they a known problem on the '06's?

Thanks for the response,

Rob
 

·
The days are getting longer!
Joined
·
8,278 Posts
I use Honda automotive coolant. Replace the fuel lines in the tank. Check the sticky for the Napa part #. It's sold in 1 ' lengths and goes for about 30 bucks, 1 piece is all you need along with new clamps and a new o ring.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
202 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
#1: Check your engine mounting bolts for proper torque setting both front and rear, *right now.*


[Bunch of stuff cut out. Look back a few posts to find the original]


It sounds like you have a nicely sorted bike. Enjoy the shit out of it. :)
Wow, thanks for the detailed response. I really appreciate that.

#1 - Will do. Just picked up a digital 3/8 torque wrench on sale at Sears. I'll use it often. It's a nice upgrade from the HF one that I had been using.

#2 - Funny that you should mention that. I already took off the middle and lowers. Getting that middle out from the front fairing was, well, fun. Shame that the middle wants to come off last, that's where almost all of the cool stuff is. I have two issues now with the fairings. The first is that a few wellnuts (or bushing/bolt combos) were bad. Is that normal or unusual? Dealer for those even though they wore out so fast? The second is that the middle mounts on the rear fairings were both broken. The tube that holds the nut is completely gone on the left and only a nub is on the right. I'd love to figure out a decent fix so I don't have to replace the panels.

#3 - I just looked at those and it looks like the witness paint marks are showing that they moved. I'll pay attention to those. Maybe its time to add safety wiring to my skill set.

#4 - Clean friction surfaces. Roger.

#5 - No sign of a case saver. Do you have a recommendation? Perhaps in red aluminum?

#6 - Tires are stock Pilot Power's. I'm going to replace them when I have the wheels coated. I'm leaning towards Pilot Road 3's because of the better rain handling. I'm not very confident in the rain and any help there is welcome. As for the ride height, the 5 to 10mm between the tire and the ground is when its on it's centerstand and level, right? The chain has been neglected. It never appears to have been cleaned. It's rusty and full of schmutz. It's getting replaced with a gold DID VX just because. I'll clean it up and keep it as a spare. Is the workshop manual or LT's manual good on the adjustment procedure?

#7, 8 & 9 - Thanks for the tips. Will do.

#10 - Roger, I'll pay attention to it.

#11 - Sounds like there are a few different ways to align the chain. If I'm renting the other tools, is the wheel kit w/ the laser worth it?

#12 - That did come as a bit of surprise on the test ride. I'm used to a big rear pedal. I've got ABS so I hope to never lock it up but I did expect a bit more grab from it.

#13 - I'll have to research the rotor buttons. I've only dealt with solid rotors before. I didn't notice anything notice anything unusual in the limited rides that I have on it but if it's something that I can check now, why not?

Thanks again for your response. It'll be a lot of help.

Rob
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,510 Posts
Talk about information overload! See, this forum is a GREAT resource!

Re. the fuel line: I only replaced the line in the tank (1 foot of line will do it for you...about $26 per foot from NAPA...so don't be shocked!). While the external lines are in the way, they don't really interfere with getting the covers off. Just slide them out of the way.

Get the case saver from LT when he gets back from his deployment. This is a easy thing to add...no stripping of body panels.

Order yourself some Au-ve-co well nuts (see the sticky above) and/or do a search on this site. They tend to compress with time and have to be replaced. When you buy a box, they come out to something like $0.30 apiece. Remember to snug them so they expend a bit...you don't have to gorilla them down!

When you adjust the valves look for play when the rocker arm is moved off of the valve. I can grab onto my valve and rock it back and forth (about 1 mm).

I have the Pilot 2 tires. I didn't go with the 3's (mostly due to the fact I don't like the way the sipes look) so I can't compare. The 2's have been great in the wet (and I'm talking some torrential, biblical wet riding this year) and I would buy them again.

I use a steel straight edge for chain alignment. While the laser would be cool...I can use the money for some other bike stuff!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
202 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Crap. I just took a good look at the bike and it looks like a performance kit wasn't installed. It has the FBF carbon cans but as far as I can tell, that's it. The air box appears to be stock, the lambda sensor is still there and connected, the ecu has a sticker that says 'St3ducati050' and when I wrap the key in tinfoil the bike won't start. It really looks to me that the original owner (I'm #3) just put the cans on it. Am I missing something?

Rob



Sent from my iPhone using Motorcycle.com Free App
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
293 Posts
I never thought about the front suspension. I'm not what anyone would consider a spirited rider. Would I notice the difference?

I forgot to mention that, for purely cosmetic reasons, I'm planning on having the wheels and shock coil powder coated red. Is having the suspension fixed a matter of mailing the forks to someone? If so, I could easily fit that in I think. I don't even any special tools for just removing the forks, right?

Yep, was planning on inspecting, contact cleaner (I've had good results with Deoxit) and dielectric grease on all of the connectors during the deep clean.

I'll have to research the TPS but I do have a 4 port Morgan CarbTune that I could use to check throttle-body sync. Another thing that I forgot to mention is that I'm lucky enough to have a dealership fairly close by that has a performance shop and a dyno. I figured that was my last stop before the season starts and let them do a final tune/ecu flash. I figure that it won't hurt having them eyeball my bike too.

Brakes are straight-forward but I do have a question about grease. The workshop manual lists all of the lubricants as Shell Unobtainium. Is there a reference around that lists good replacements that can actually be bought in the US?

As for the clutch, steering head and rotors, I'll have to research those as well. Thanks for pointing those out.

Rob
Personally, I'd paint the wheels rather than powder coat simply for ease of touch up if they were to get scuffed. Lubricants are listed as Shell because of a Ducati/Shell marketing agreement, equivalents abound and everyone has their own brand favorites. With vigilance and timely changes the brand shouldn't be an issue. +1 on suspension regardless of how spirited the riding style. My ST had been set up for a rider roughly 6" shorter and 40 lbs lighter, getting it tuned to my height/weight made it a completely different riding experience (enjoyable vs. work) and you can make the basic adjustments yourself. There's a lot of info on suspension set up on the forum. Main thing is to find a baseline (I used factory stock settings to start) and make incremental adjustments....ride the same stretch of road to test, and keep detailed notes. It takes time, but I'd rate that as the number one improvement you can make to improve the bike. After it's sorted out then anything else you do is icing on the proverbial cake. Good luck and have fun!


Sent from my iPhone using Motorcycle.com App
 

·
Member
Joined
·
7,733 Posts
When you wrap your key in tin foil, the bike won't start? :confused: Are you taking the tin foil hat off first?:) :crazy: I don't understand what that means re wrapping the key in tin foil and the bike won't start. :)

How does the bike run? Any lean surging? Any popping out the cans? Some '06/'07 closed loop/lambda sensor systems owners have said that's all they did, ie slip-ons, and that they had no running issues. :) You may be okay too.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
202 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
When you wrap your key in tin foil, the bike won't start? :confused: Are you taking the tin foil hat off first?:) :crazy: I don't understand what that means re wrapping the key in tin foil and the bike won't start. :)

How does the bike run? Any lean surging? Any popping out the cans? Some '06/'07 closed loop/lambda sensor systems owners have said that's all they did, ie slip-ons, and that they had no running issues. :) You may be okay too.
If I thought that there was an RFID chip or other low-power transponder in my head, a tinfoil hat would be suitable headgear. Tinfoil is a very effective blocker of those low-power signals. When I wrapped the key in foil, I blocked it's signal to the immobilizer antenna, hence no starty. Remove the foil, the signal goes through, bike starts. Don't believe me? Try it yourself. Fold some foil in a square, poke the key part through it and wrap the black plastic part with the rest of the foil. It works on anything with an RFID chip. (RFID security card for doors, car keys, proximity keys, a tollway transponder, credit cards, etc...) When I went to the tollway office, that happened to be in an oasis on the tollway, to pickup another transponder they kindly wrapped it in tinfoil to prevent me from being double billed when I drove under the reader again. My little test proved that the immobilizer is not disabled in my bike's ecu hence it probably isn't a DP ecu.

Sadly I haven't gotten the chance to ride it much. It ran rough down low (I'm thinking valve adjustment), had a big hesitation when given anything more than a 1/4 throttle when at 5k and had some decel popping. When it's idling it smells rich, i mean really rich.

Rob
 
1 - 20 of 35 Posts
Top