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Retired Pipe Polisher C2H6O+
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I tried cycling shorts but didn’t like the pads. LD Comforts don’t have pads. It’s all about the material, fit, and no seems.


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So, earplugs seem like a must-have, got it. I wish I drove one of those, the plan is to build an early C3 some day!

I like but don't love the boots, they were a good price, is there a go-to for an over the ankle boot that allows some kind of normal movement? I want ankle protection and bracing so I don't expect a pair of sneakers, however the Ridges do feel soft of puffy/stiff. I do plan to get better gloves but that'll just be me being bored one day and going to the shop. I'll probably get another pair of pants and some kind of leather next year, no reason to worry now.
Those boots look fine, i've always worn Astars and yeah, occasionally the soles seperate from the boot but they can be reglued by a cobbler, mine have always lasted for ages. I currently wear supertech R and like all of them they are like slippers once broken in, i LOVE them.

When i'm on my dual sport i wear Forma evo which are a heavy duty mid height boot that my jeans can go over and they're pretty good, not as comfy as my Astars but they're not fully broken in yet.

If you ride a lot you will wear them out so use them hard, treat them with contempt and see how they last, one thing is for sure, when you're ready to replace them you will know exactly what you want in your new pair
 

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One last bit of advice on gear. Its always a good idea to have extra or at least a rain suit. I take a few multi day trips every year. Trailer two bikes and camping stuff and gear. Having some dry gear to wear if you get caught out in the rain is very nice. Struggling into wet gear is no fun. It may be overkill but I take two jackets, 2 sets of leather pants, textile pants , 3 helmets and three pairs of gloves. If I take a bike on a long trip I make sure to have rain protection even if it looks like it will be dry. Trust me. A good rain suit is affordable and makes riding much nicer and safer when the going gets rainy. Rotating gear if you have a base camp is a nice luxury.

When you are sweating balls in the mountains its nice to have a helmet or a pair of pants that doesn't smell like swamp ass. I would like a second set of boots but even I have my limits.
 

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My next pair of boots will probably be custom from Bates.
My current faves are custom made by Z Custom, but dammit they don't make boots any more.
They fit like they were made just for me, cuz they were.
 

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... Saturday when you go there they will have marked those riding shorts down to under $50 and you buy them. Yes, they may be horribly lurid colors, but don't concern yourself with that as the nurses in the ER have seen everything despite your mothers advice on underwear. Never again in your life will you spend that much on panties unless you are dating a supermodel, but you will never regret it.

*Edit - hand wash only
Or maybe shop Bike Nashbar?
Maybe get another pair 4 UR supermodel. Then we can all drool! ;-)
 

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Oh, I did have a pair of those boots. They were OK, but I prefer a taller boot (and waterproof!).
 

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Another vote for good earplugs (no such thing as a quiet enough helmet).

I also second the idea to not short change your extremities. Good gloves and boots... get em. I used heavy work boots for a few years and got away with it, but they're not the same as proper riding boots. You don't need the cartoony transformers plastic exoskelaton boots if that's not your vibe, but good riding boots have features that protect your feet and ankles, work boots don't have that stuff.
IMO Daytona's are the best boots in the world but they're expensive... I know folks who really like Sidi and their pricing is a lot better, but there are likely a number of brands that are good quality and hit desirable price points. I also tend to buy US, Japan or Europe and avoid Chinese brands, there may be solid Chinese designs but they tend to worry a lot about form and very little about function (check out - "Chinese auto industry crash test results"). I switched my helmet from HJC to Shoei for that same reason, where Chinese mfgrs tend to cut corners are always in areas you can't easily see the difference - safety is an area that is often hard to discriminate good from bad.

Gloves are also an area where you should spend a good chunk of money - good leather that's designed for riding (pre-shaped to fit grips without bunching), features like inserts to protect impact areas, abrasion resistance in the palm, etc... basic leather riding gloves can be had for $50... but more protective long gloves will be $150+. I have a 3 or 4 pair for different conditions.
 

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That bicycle guys legs are freaking me out. :LOL:
Bicycle guys can have pretty thick legs... but that guy looks more like a bodybuilder who happens to ride - bikers are super thin beanpoles in general with minimal upper body strength (fit but not bodybuilder looking - just adds weight and slows you down).
 

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Those thighs are something, eh? He is a velodrome racer, kinda like a drag race around a few laps in a steep breakfast cereal bowl made of wood. They only have one gear, single speed and its a big ratio.

The Pearl Izumi shorts mentioned above are the baggy diaper type. Nashbar does carry some of the good ones, Giordana and Assos are two of them.


Can't go wrong with any of these on this page marked down from $300 to $50 (if ever)
 

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Some advice that might be useful, or might not. I've been off my bike a few times, on (well - off ;) ) track and twisty back roads. Since you now own a Ducati, I assume you're at least going to have fun on twisty roads. If you're only going to ride around town at low speeds, my advice might be overkill ;)

After writing these I also realized I focused a lot on crashing/safety. I do get that most of the time we are not crashing, and other aspects such as price. comfort and style matters. But, whenever I've had an involuntary departure from my motorcycle I've always been happy to wear:
  • A helmet that really fits my head snugly. Such a helmet is also nice when actually riding...
    • I've no opinion of your helmet, but if it really fits your head that's good
  • Back protector. Your back is pretty important. I remember a Dainese Bap2 imprint on my back for a few days after a highside. That crash is now a funny/good memory because of that protector
    • Get a back protector, one that goes on your body and not in the jacket (like the one you bought...)
  • Boots with ankle and heel protection. I cannot understate these. I've had black and blue feet after a crash, but no injuries here because of proper boots
    • Your boots are OK for riding around town. For anyting else, check out those Sidi boots in the post above. See how they are braced around the ankle/heel?
  • Gloves protecting knuckles, pinky finger, 5th metacarp and that knuckle above wrist. Your hand needs impact, not just sliding protection in a crash
    • I would not do my kind of riding in your gloves
  • Full leathers with protection inserts. It's important that they fit properly, since that keeps the protection inserts in the right place when the going gets tough
    • Leathers can usually be crashed multiple times. Nylon/Kevlar/WhateverElse can be crashed one time
    • Anything that might slip apart between pants and jacket is a no-no. Your combination might expose your back in a slide. Bye bye skin.
    • Jacket: If it doesn't fit snugly, protection will slide around and not be useful. Your elbow will pay the price in a crash.
    • Pants: Where is the protection on hips and knees? If you buy the inserts, will they stay in place to do their job in a crash? I dont' know....
 
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