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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
1006861
1006862
Here you go! Please keep in mind this is not for riding the bike for any amount of time, only testing to get her running properly. You might get away with it with heat wrap but I wouldn’t advise it.

The new plan is to use a Corse Dynamics fuel pump flange, hopefully they will sell it without the fittings! Once that comes in I want to try drilling and taping the original flange. There seems to be enough material for this but again I don’t want to destroy my fuel system without having a back up in place already.

My next issue was transitioning from idle to part throttle caused the bike to stumble/misfire and die. Bike was unable to maintain any throttle input below about 3500 rpm. I removed the DP Paul smart ECUs that was installed and put the stock ecu back in. Bike now runs in lower RPM but wanders (mostly gaining rpm with no additional throttle input). I ordered the fatduc O2 bypass as I’ve read that it dramatically improves low RPM performance and smoothness. It was also suggested by a local shop to check the air screws on the throttles as they effect low rpm performance. If anyone has any other suggestions please let me know.

I discovered that one of the extra bits included with the bike was a DP intake cover (one with the hole cut out). Maybe that was causing the improper low rpm throttle with the other ECU? The bike has Termi exhaust so I was assuming the ECU was the one for the exhaust but I’m not 100% since the previous owner installed these parts.
 

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iirc, if you are running termis, you should use the DP Paul Smart ECU, not the stock. you also should not need the fatduc O2 bypass. i would put back together and check the throttle settings first.
 

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Dropping a tooth on the front sprocket or adding 2-3 teeth on the back sprocket (preferred method) is the best way to "fix" the low RPM throttle snatch issues on these bikes. Also agree with mopgcw that the DP ECU is needed with the performance exhaust and that the DP intake cover should be on with that ECU as well. It likely just needs a tune and TPS set to make it run correctly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
iirc, if you are running termis, you should use the DP Paul Smart ECU, not the stock. you also should not need the fatduc O2 bypass. i would put back together and check the throttle settings first.
Which throttle settings do I need to check? I just ran the bike around the block at 20-25 mph and it’s running fairly well. Unless the stock ECU was on the bike and I put the PS ECU in? They don’t have any distinctive markings to tell them apart from what I can see.
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
Dropping a tooth on the front sprocket or adding 2-3 teeth on the back sprocket (preferred method) is the best way to "fix" the low RPM throttle snatch issues on these bikes. Also agree with mopgcw that the DP ECU is needed with the performance exhaust and that the DP intake cover should be on with that ECU as well. It likely just needs a tune and TPS set to make it run correctly.
I called a local shop here in Pensacola Florida and the tech I talked to said you can’t tune the stock ecm. I asked about the tps tuning as well and he again said no tuning on stock ecm. Who do I need to talk to about having this done? (That shop is a licensed Ducati dealer from what he said).

He also said something about the cams need to be locked when changing belts with a special pin.
 

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You don't need to lock the cams on a 2 valve motor provided you pay attention to what you are doing. Lots of YouTube videos show you how to change cam belts. Brad the Bike Boy in Oz and Chris at CA Cycleworks (who also sells high-quality aftermarket belts) both have excellent tutorials. Not one of them shows locking the cams before removing and changing the belts. You do however need to have some attention to detail. There are two or three free program downloads available online that allow you to set the throttle position sensor, properly tension the belts after you change them and change/adjust quite a few other perimeters on your ECU with your laptop. Personally I don't know that I'd trust that "tech" to play with my bike given what he has told you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
I’ll look up those programs, I always like doing things myself anyways.

He was saying the cams have to be locked because the gears can be degreed and can shift overtime causing them to be slightly off from each other.
 

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Dropping a tooth on the front sprocket or adding 2-3 teeth on the back sprocket (preferred method) is the best way to "fix" the low RPM throttle snatch issues on these bikes. Also agree with mopgcw that the DP ECU is needed with the performance exhaust and that the DP intake cover should be on with that ECU as well. It likely just needs a tune and TPS set to make it run correctly.
He may already have the DP ecu, that looks like the DP airbox cover in his photo.
 

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Here's one of the programs. You will need 2 cables to hook it up.


You can destroy your ECU if you don't follow directions so if your old and mostly computer illiterate like me be careful.
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
Here's one of the programs. You will need 2 cables to hook it up.


You can destroy your ECU if you don't follow directions so if your old and mostly computer illiterate like me be careful.
Oh I am Stone Age when it comes to computers and programming. I can learn anything mechanical but the digital world is beyond me. I’ll probably end up paying a high schooler in vape juice and skinny jeans to figure this out for me!
 

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the DP ECU you need is 96517006B. there should be sticker w/ this # on it. the prior owner should have had it properly mapped at the time,as it would be difficult to have the termis installed and the bike running w/out it and they usually came w/ the termis. eliminate the simplest issues first -- make sure the DP ECU is installed (and the intake cover as noted by Straduc) and tune your throttle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
the DP ECU you need is 96517006B. there should be sticker w/ this # on it. the prior owner should have had it properly mapped at the time,as it would be difficult to have the termis installed and the bike running w/out it and they usually came w/ the termis. eliminate the simplest issues first -- make sure the DP ECU is installed (and the intake cover as noted by Straduc) and tune your throttle.
1006921
1006922


This is the ECU that was on the bike which I removed (supposedly the performance ECU for the pipes). The other ECU is the same with the exception of the number under the bar code which is 60HW16671 188 08.
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
1006923

This is the box that the (possibly) stock ECU was in when I bought the bike.
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
I did take the bike on a test ride (about 10 min) and even with the tune issues I found the bike to be very controlled and not snatchy (as I’ve heard it described). I don’t have anything to compare to as I didn’t ride the bike with the oem throttle but it was easy to install and seems to operate smoothly. Hope that helps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #37 ·
the 2235LF02 is the stock ecu. i would suspect the prior owner put that in the box when it was replaced. the label on the box has the correct DP #.
That ECU was mounted on the bike at time of purchase (he told it was the performance ECU). If the LF02 unit is a stock unit it barely ran on the bike as stated above. Makes me wonder if these parts were purchased 2nd hand and maybe they aren’t what he thought he was getting?

Either way I’ll do some more testing when the threaded corse Dynamics fuel pump flange comes in (big thanks to motowheels for that). I can put the correct air box lid on and try both ECUs again.
 

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That ECU was mounted on the bike at time of purchase (he told it was the performance ECU). If the LF02 unit is a stock unit it barely ran on the bike as stated above.
The DP ECU 96517006B does NOT use the O2 sensor. I don't know for sure, but I think the original Termi kit came with a bung plug for when you removed the sensor. A stock ECU without the O2 sensor would probably run as you've described, really crappy down low. That's where its supposed to read the O2 sensor, up to around 4K, and then it just runs on a map.
Check to see if the O2 sensor is till in place on the crossover pipe. If it's there, check to see whether it's plugged in! And with all this messing around, you WILL need to re-set the TPS sensor as this will make a big difference with off-idle characteristics.
 

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Discussion Starter · #39 ·
O2 sensor is still in place, I’ll trace the wires and check if it’s plugged in tonight when I get home. I’m with you on the TPS though, I’m gonna make some calls and see if I can find someone to do it locally (I’m really not comfortable running the program above by myself just yet to access the ECU software).

Thanks for all the suggestions guys.
 

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Discussion Starter · #40 ·
Extended shake down today, lost all the air in the front tire due to a leaky schrader valve. All fixed up and the bike runs great (low rpm throttle is still not where I want it) especially cruising at 4K rpm.
 
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