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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited by Moderator)
Hi all - new to the forums and new to Ducati. Just upgraded from a 2016 Triumph Tiger 800xcx to a 2015 multistrada 1200s. So far I absolutely love it! Extremely comfortable to ride, waaaay more power, and I love the engine rumble now compared to the triple, which was no slouch don’t get me wrong, but sounded like a distressed sewing machine at highway speed, and I found myself always wanting to shift up from 6th, even at 120kph. And the suspension. Wow the skyhook is amazing, I love setting it up extra soft for 2 up touring setting, make my wife extra comfortable and easy on the throttle, easy on the throttle (I have to keep reminding myself lmao) and then set it nice and stiff for sport mode.

Immediately I have a couple of things on the bike though, minor things, that I find irritating, I wonder if you have found the same, and if there are known solutions or I have to improvise.

First is the rear brake lever. It’s lower than I’m used to, which I can adjust, but it also feels really tucked back in under the motor. It feels difficult to access, like I have to angle my foot inwards to press it rather than just straight down. It’s an uncomfortable motion and I already find myself using it way less.

Next is the switch to activate the high beams, it’s very long, so long that the edge of my hand rubs it when I move to touch the front brake, I keep switching to high beams or flashing them by accident.

The last one is the peg position, they’re actually a fair amount higher and farther back than the Tiger, which I suppose gives a more sporty feel, and this is something I’m sure I’ll get used to. The thing that bugs me is I ride with the balls of my feet on the pegs, and in this position the heel of my right foot touches the exhaust heat shroud, rests against it. And my left heel rests against the centre stand lever. I’d remove the centre stand honestly, but at this point if one heel is against something I’d rather have both against something.

Had the bike for a couple weeks now, I love it I dream about it I want nothing more at the end of a ride than to get back on it and go again! Sucks winter is on its way!
 

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I've never heard that complaint about the headlight switch. I assume you mean it gets in the way when you use the clutch, not the brake.
 

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I came from a Tiger to a Multi and I flipped the highbeam switch a few times by accident in the first few months of ownership... but it's not happened in years now. I found I was crowding my hands very inward on the grips and just needed to relax the grab position a bit... maybe there's something about Triumphs that causes riders to crowd the inside of the grip.

On the very rare occasions that I need to use the rear brake I'm way more annoyed by how useless it is than the position... though it IS low.
 

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The last one is the peg position, they’re actually a fair amount higher and farther back than the Tiger, which I suppose gives a more sporty feel, and this is something I’m sure I’ll get used to. The thing that bugs me is I ride with the balls of my feet on the pegs, and in this position the heel of my right foot touches the exhaust heat shroud, rests against it. And my left heel rests against the centre stand lever. I’d remove the centre stand honestly, but at this point if one heel is against something I’d rather have both against something.
This irritation stands out to me - the others I think you will get used to quickly.

Through some Ducati events I've attended in the past I've had chance to talk with some Ducati designers and test riders. They are well aware of the foot position issue with respect to the centre (center US spelling) stand and the heat shroud. Honestly they didn't have good answers other than it was a compromise for them.
Moving the center stand back would create problems of leverage.
It really does need a full re-design effort, but I think they consider that they have bigger fish to fry right now.

I have just got used to re-positioning my feet when riding the multi.
 

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Species that cannot adapt to change go extinct. Try it for a while, you may get used to it. I went from a Harley to a 900SS, so the footpeg location was so high and far back it felt like rear sets to me. I used to bend foot controls on dirt bike to place them where I wanted them, and the light switch could always be shortened with a Dremel. They make footpegs that are a little lower, check eBay. They may have some for your bike.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I've never heard that complaint about the headlight switch. I assume you mean it gets in the way when you use the clutch, not the brake.
Lmao yes clutch not front brake. I’m a dumbass
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I came from a Tiger to a Multi and I flipped the highbeam switch a few times by accident in the first few months of ownership... but it's not happened in years now. I found I was crowding my hands very inward on the grips and just needed to relax the grab position a bit... maybe there's something about Triumphs that causes riders to crowd the inside of the grip.

On the very rare occasions that I need to use the rear brake I'm way more annoyed by how useless it is than the position... though it IS low.
Very good point. I had a close look at my grip position and I’m definitely crowding inside. I’ll relax a bit and try again. Honestly I find it less and less of an irritation every time I ride, so it must mean I’m adapting. It is a wacky long switch though!
 

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The rear brake likely needs bleeding, they are notoriously poor. Has the bike been dropped and lever bent inwards?
Some people reduce the length of the centre stand by 50mm to get the part that fouls your foot out the way.
 

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Very good point. I had a close look at my grip position and I’m definitely crowding inside. I’ll relax a bit and try again. Honestly I find it less and less of an irritation every time I ride, so it must mean I’m adapting. It is a wacky long switch though!
Yea I thought about shortening it but didn't at the time... now I'm glad I didn't, it's super easy to use.
 

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Yes, the rear brake could be improved to lessen the servicing. I've notice however that using it constantly does one of two things: Improves it or reminds you to service it.

As per "The Pace 2":
Perhaps the biggest myth lies in the sportbike world where riders have heard “never touch the rear brake.” The advice should be “never stab the rear brake.” Yes, in an emergency situation, it might only provide a small percentage of the overall stopping power due to a sportbike’s weight transfer, but this sport is all about small percentages. If you miss the car in your lane by one foot, you’ve missed the car, right? Add rear-brake finesse to your riding portfolio.

https://www.cycleworld.com/2013/09/16/become-a-better-street-rider-with-the-pace-motorcycle-safety-and-riding-skills/#page-4
 

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It took me two days of test riding a Multistrada before I FOUND the damn high beam switch! Now my Aprilia Tuono V4 has the same stupid switch. I just leave it on high. :eek:
 

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For the footpegs you can find aftermarkets on ebay that rotate and adjust so you can either lower or raise.

As far as the brake lever put a riser on, i did one yers ago by welding 1" aluminum plate for my '12 p.p. and worked like a charm.
 

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I've only had mine for six days. For me, everything is very different expect the engine braking; my other bike is an "81 Hailwood Replica; light-years away technology wise. Here are a few of my early observations:
- The first day I rode about 300km and missed gears, got a few false neutrals and my left foot never seemed to be in the right position immediately after taking off from a standing start. As soon as I got home, I swapped boots from new, "enduro" styled (stiff sole, high-sided, generally thicker around the foot) to my summer boots and it was night and day; I found the gears easily. The next day I put the big boots on again and now that I know what's going on, I've only missed a few gears, usually when up-shifting. A subtle adjustment of the gear lever position may fix this but It's such early days for me, I'm going to try and train my left foot first.
- The rear brake is perfect for me; I don't experience any issues operating it or with my foot interfering with the silencer (or the centre stand on the other side either).
- The fly by wire throttle is ridiculously over-sensitive; I find tiny movements of my body can result in speed/engine braking jerkiness. At low speeds, it's really very twitchy even when in "Urban" mode. This is just something I have to adapt to. I found something as small as changing the heat setting on the grips required extra thought; reaching over and up with my right thumb will shut off the throttle if I'm not careful.
- I only switched the main beam on by accident twice on the first day and have learned to move my left hand over just a little to stop this.
- Gearing is odd; I think this may be a DVT thing. Finding the "happy spots" with gearing and speed is not as obvious as it has been on any other bike I've ridden. I'm sure that this is just another thing that will come with time. I am going to change my "Urban" mode display to include the tachometer; half the time, I can't hear the engine well enough to "feel" it.
- The only real "issue" I have with the bike is its seat height; I'm 6'1" (186cm) with a 32" inseam (81cm). Even with my bigger boots on, only the balls of my feet are touching the ground so I find myself choosing parking and stopping spots very carefully; I can't simply ride in head first to a parking spot and later "simply" back out with a few waddles; I have no leverage. Things would be much worse in the wet. I've adopted the practice of stopping at most lights in first gear with my left foot up and my right foot planted firmly on the ground by shifting my bum to the right. I look for slight ramps to ride up on and back out of assisted by gravity when parking. More often than not, I simply have to manhandle the bike, standing to its left, to get out of tighter parking spots.

Other than this, what a great bike; really smooth handling and suspension, gobs of power. I've read of a dead spot between 4 and 6k rpm but I haven't observed this yet, possibly due to my selection of gears at different, common speeds.
 

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Also moved from a Tiger to the Multi, and agree with everything. And I've just gotten used to everything, including moving my fingers away from the high beam switch and getting used to using the pegs differently. I think the Tiger was more comfortable for long stretches of road, but I've managed find on the Multi.
 

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Also moved from a Tiger to the Multi, and agree with everything. And I've just gotten used to everything, including moving my fingers away from the high beam switch and getting used to using the pegs differently. I think the Tiger was more comfortable for long stretches of road, but I've managed find on the Multi.
I originally thought my Tiger was more comfortable but now it feels cramped when I ride it and the Multi feels like a more natural posture and comfortable overall... so for me it's just what I'm used to maybe.
 

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The Multistrada has been a winner for Ducati for a reason. Of all the performance focused bikes I've ridden, the Multistrada is by and large the most comfortable and well equipped with all the creatures of comfort I could possibly want or need.
 

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I have about 1000 miles on a 2017 Multistrada and I must say I have the same complaints. I am getting more in tune with the bike but will make some changes to make it fit me.

Good luck with your adventure!
 

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I forgot to mention one other "issue"; at really low speed, the massive front brakes are really grabby. The bike has only 1070km on it but I've done highway, winding roads and some downtown and expected that by now, the front brakes would be more manageable; no issue at all at higher speeds. I find that when slowing down at a stop, at crawling speeds, the bike will jerk to a stop really easily resulting in me bunny hopping to my intended stopping point. This may go away and as I know to expect it, it's not been a big issue so far, but I haven't done any wet weather riding yet and can't help but be concerned that this will result in mini-slides on greasy junctions even with ABS.
 
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