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Discussion Starter #1
Just picked up the new duke and wanting to lower the front 1cm to 2cm by raising fork tubes in tree,anyone done this ?
 

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I had this exact bike and it was very agile, especially after I had the suspension dialed in. I’d suggest getting the suspension set up for your weight and riding style before altering the geometry. Ohlins shock and Showa forks are nice pieces of kit and there is something special about he SS frame IMO. Enjoy!
 

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I have a ‘96 SS and have slid the tubes up quite a bit, can’t remember exactly how much. The bike never became unstable in any way from this adjustment. However , I did bottom out on a huge pothole and crushed my carbon front fender, so watch for that possibility.
I’m not sure how similar the frame geometry is between the two bikes. I suggest you set SAG correctly first for your weight before messing further with fork geometry.
 

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Doesn't the rear Ohlins on that bike have a length adjustment on the bottom of the shock?

If you're looking for quicker turn in, I'd raise the rear a little and see how you like it.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
that's a lot of change. why do you want to lower it?
With some one on the back it's floating the front on turn in corners and wheelstands way to easy can't get more than 3 quarter throttle on 1st or second
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I have a ‘96 SS and have slid the tubes up quite a bit, can’t remember exactly how much. The bike never became unstable in any way from this adjustment. However , I did bottom out on a huge pothole and crushed my carbon front fender, so watch for that possibility.
I’m not sure how similar the frame geometry is between the two bikes. I suggest you set SAG correctly first for your weight before messing further with fork geometry.
I only want to go 1cm maybe 1.5 how far do you think you did yours ?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Yes if it was to soft or bouncing in rear I would stiffen up seems pretty good on the rear side of things
 

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Doesn't the rear Ohlins on that bike have a length adjustment on the bottom of the shock?

If you're looking for quicker turn in, I'd raise the rear a little and see how you like it.
Yes it's got ohlins rear but can't raise it any higher as I am 5.7 and with pillion it's height is perfect in rear atm
 

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I believe What people are saying is that the geometry is close in stock form so the issue comes from the added weight on the back messing up the correct geometry. lowering the front of the bike will put more weight on the front end but as mentioned the problem is truly with the back not the front so you will be trading problems. I have lowered bikes plenty (including SSie bikes) but never for your complaint. A better solution is to set the springs up for how you ride the bike most and then find a way to easily adapt for the other.

A better solution might be a stiffer rear spring and/or a hydraulic preload adjuster for when you add the extra weight on the back. most do not have much range (6-8mm common) but that certainly helps the bike when changing its load considerably. Also do not forget to make sure your damping is correct if the bike is behaving that badly it sounds as though the rear is squatting way to much under throttle which could be too little spring for the weight or to little compression damping allowing the back to squat too easily.

Dropping the nose of the bike would be a poor bandaid on what might not cost much to fix correctly, you will give away ground clearance you will want especially if you are overloading the stock springs already. Find a local suspension shop and let them know what you want it to do including percentage of time with the extra weight and they should be able to come up with a solution that will increase comfort, handling and get the chassis better under control. Who knows if the previous owner(s) has not had things changed for a different purpose that stock?
 

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I only want to go 1cm maybe 1.5 how far do you think you did yours ?
Its apart right now so I can’t even give you a measurement, but I use the grooves at the top of the fork for easy measuring so not past them . Remember, as I said, I was too far because I smashed my fender bottoming out and was lucky I didn’t high side.
Going beyond what you asked, are you just trying to lower the bike ? If you are, you don’t want to do it all on the front end. Dont ignore a set of boots with thick soles. You can pick up valuable leg length that way as well as protecting your lower legs and feet. A pair of adventure boots can add up to an inch without affecting clearance or bike geometry.
Lower profile tires when you buy new ones will help.
I lowered both ends of my SS a little. I’m 5’7” with a 29” inseam and I don’t like to be on my toes at lights or have trouble backing up.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Its apart right now so I can’t even give you a measurement, but I use the grooves at the top of the fork for easy measuring so not past them . Remember, as I said, I was too far because I smashed my fender bottoming out and was lucky I didn’t high side.
Going beyond what you asked, are you just trying to lower the bike ? If you are, you don’t want to do it all on the front end. Dont ignore a set of boots with thick soles. You can pick up valuable leg length that way as well as protecting your lower legs and feet. A pair of adventure boots can add up to an inch without affecting clearance or bike geometry.
Lower profile tires when you buy new ones will help.
I lowered both ends of my SS a little. I’m 5’7” with a 29” inseam and I don’t like to be on my toes at lights or have trouble backing up.
The rear is not set soft or having any problems with the pillion weight and I am not going to be adjusting the rear like all these people are saying. Seat height is good for me without pillion and only goes down a fraction when taking the wife. I can wheelstand a mt-01 so I know what a nice rear set up feels like. When you look at a 2006 1000ds the bike sits virtually flat from front to rear. I just had a evo 2012 for a couple of months and yes to savage head down ass up but you could feel the weight bias more on the front. The 1000 feels to light weight biased in the front hence why I want to lower it the 1cm or so . I think it would only lower fairing .5 to .8cm ? As it has that angle in forks. This would give it a hand with turn in and weight front end a fraction more to hopefully get more throttle down before doing wheelies every time in first and second. I notice that 1999 900 ss look lower in the front compared to 2006 1000ds? Your comments are appreciated
 

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Sometimes the best way to find out what happens is “ just do it”.
 
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Discussion Starter #17
I believe What people are saying is that the geometry is close in stock form so the issue comes from the added weight on the back messing up the correct geometry. lowering the front of the bike will put more weight on the front end but as mentioned the problem is truly with the back not the front so you will be trading problems. I have lowered bikes plenty (including SSie bikes) but never for your complaint. A better solution is to set the springs up for how you ride the bike most and then find a way to easily adapt for the other.

A better solution might be a stiffer rear spring and/or a hydraulic preload adjuster for when you add the extra weight on the back. most do not have much range (6-8mm common) but that certainly helps the bike when changing its load considerably. Also do not forget to make sure your damping is correct if the bike is behaving that badly it sounds as though the rear is squatting way to much under throttle which could be too little spring for the weight or to little compression damping allowing the back to squat too easily.

Dropping the nose of the bike would be a poor bandaid on what might not cost much to fix correctly, you will give away ground clearance you will want especially if you are overloading the stock springs already. Find a local suspension shop and let them know what you want it to do including percentage of time with the extra weight and they should be able to come up with a solution that will increase comfort, handling and get the chassis better under control. Who knows if the previous owner(s) has not had things changed for a different purpose that stock?
Thankyou for your reply I will be doing a change in front oil forks and resetting after moving tubes up a little, can you tell me how much you lowered the fronts on your ss bikes and it's change on turn in?Or change in road feel ,cheers
 

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I typically do not lower the front unless there is a need, usually there is not.

Start with oem geometry, fuel tank full-half tank. Rider must be at approximate riding gear weight (w/gear). if setting up for mostly passenger do not forget that weight and location as well.
Step two measure and set race sag.
step three determine if preload is in a usable range if not change springs until it is.
while changing springs determine if damping changes are also needed, this can sometimes done with oil often not.
step four re-check step two and add measuring rake to determine if chassis changes are still needed.
step five make chassis changes to set swingarm angle and set rake.
step six re-check step two and three.

This works fine on street and track but know that if you are adding a 50lb plus weight up and behind the rider every so often you will need to have a way to change preload easily. I would suggest springing for your higher rate solo spring and adding a hydraulic preload adjuster that you max out with a passenger/gear added. This will leave you the bike set on the firm side solo but help resist it from turning into a chopper with a passenger. As always a compromise.

I guess you could also set the bike up 100% of the time for your passengers weight and swap the rider for some ballast when you are riding solo.
 

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I would not add ballast unless you have a way to secure it really well. If it shifts when you’re not expecting , like on a curve , you might crash. It would be hard to duplicate body weight anyway, without it being really bulky.
 
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