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Discussion Starter #1
I was thinking that I'd love to have one of the new Duc Multistrada 1200's but I was seriously put off by the apparent maintenance costs.

I found that to keep your warranty valid, the first three scheduled maintenance checks and procedures must be done at a dealership shop. I know that there's a law that prevents dealers from denying warranty coverage etc. but I wouldn't want the hassles of fighting them about it and this requirement is stated right up front in writing in the Ducati warranty agreement.

Anyhow, I was talking to a Denver dealer about it and he said that they had an in-house service agreement that covers all costs of the first six scheduled maintenance visits for $2000. It's not transferable and it only works at their dealerships. Naturally, it doesn't cover consumables like tires, brake pads etc. Just the parts and labor required for the scheduled maintenance checks & adjustments - valve shims, coolant, brake fluid, gaskets, shop supplies, EPA disposal fees, stuff like that.

It sounded high at first, but it would cover the initial 600 mile service, then five of the succeeding 7500 mile services. It covers parts, labor, everything.

Sounds like a pretty good deal, but I wanted to get the opinions of some of you guys that have owned Ducs for a while and have a good idea about the actual maintenance costs before I bought it. :confused:

Any and all info/opinions/pros/cons will be VERY much appreciated! :)

Thanks,

John
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Disclaimer: The views expressed in this post are solely those of the poster and do not necessarily represent those of anyone else on this or any other forum - nor any other person from any country, planet, galaxy or universe - so don't get yer drawers in a bunch.
 

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Some advice for - Need Some Advice Pronto

Don't be afraid to buy a Ducati - All makes and models have scheduled maintenance costs that are high if they are done only at a dealership.

What are the individual costs for each service covered by the in-house agreement? If you intend on getting the first six services at that dealership and the $2000 package is less than all the services added up individually then it is not a bad deal.

However, It may be better just to pay for the first 3 services and then shop around for the other services, or do them yourself.

See if you could get a deal for the first 3 services as a package, that makes more sense to me, since they are required under warranty to be at a dealership.

Learn to do the basic stuff on your own - change the oil, change the brake pads, change the spark plug, change the air filter, maintain the battery, check tire pressure, and adjust the cables. If it is liquid cooled learn to change the coolant. As you become more confident you can learn to change the timing belts and check valve clearance. If you learn to do these things then the cost of maintaining your Ducati dream machine will go down considerably.

There are numerous videos on YouTube that show you exactly how to do these things. Learn one procedure at a time. If you come across something that you do not have the confidence to do then get a dealership to do that one task only - this will keep the cost of each visit down considerably.

Good Luck
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Don't be afraid to buy a Ducati - All makes and models have scheduled maintenance costs that are high if they are done only at a dealership.

What are the individual costs for each service covered by the in-house agreement. If you intend on getting the first six services at that dealership and the $2000 package is less than all the services added up individually then it is not a bad deal.

However, It may be better just to pay for the first 3 services and then shop around for the other services, or do them yourself.

See if you could get a deal for the first 3 services as a package, that makes more sense to me, since they are required under warranty to be at a dealership.

Learn to do the basic stuff on your own - change the oil, change the brake pads, change the spark plug, change the air filter, maintain the battery, check tire pressure, and adjust the cables. If it is liquid cooled learn to change the coolant. As you become more confident you can learn to change the timing belts and check valve clearance. If you learn to do these things then the cost of maintaining your Ducati dream machine will go down considerably.

There are numerous videos on YouTube that show you exactly how to do these things. Learn one procedure at a time. If you come across something that you do not have the confidence to do then get a dealership to do that one task only - this will keep the cost of each visit down considerably.

Good Luck
Hi,

Thanks for the response and encouragement!

Yeah, I'm sure I could learn to do essentially all of the maintenance, checks, procedures etc. on this bike, including valve adjustments. I've been a licensed aircraft mechanic and inspector for 35 years and so far (knock wood) I've gotten it right the first time, every time.

My problem is that if the motor blew up or there was some other catastrophic failure of some kind and I hadn't fulfilled the warranty requirement of the first 3 maintenance completions at a dealership, then they would certainly deny covering the repairs and I'd be screwed unless I took them to court. Seems kinda like extortion, but I guess that's just the way it is. I'm sure this is the reasoning behind their warranty requirements.

I'm pretty sure that no other manufacturer has this specific requirement, since it's clearly illegal and non-enforceable in the US due to the Moss-Magnusson Act. I'm surprised that there hasn't been some sort of class action suit regarding this.

Oh well...
 

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Some more advice for Need Some Advice

I would make sure that you received documentation from your dealer that included a complete list of all the services performed at each service visit - especially first three - just to cover your butt.

The issue in regards the legality of the warranty requirement is something that could be tackled later. For now you need to get those 3 services done with the correct documentation.

Hopefully you will develop a good relationship with the dealer.

Once you get a Ducati there is no going back.

Good Luck
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I would make sure that you received documentation from your dealer that included a complete list of all the services performed at each service visit - especially first three - just to cover your butt.

The issue in regards the legality of the warranty requirement is something that could be tackled later. For now you need to get those 3 services done with the correct documentation.

Hopefully you will develop a good relationship with the dealer.

Once you get a Ducati there is no going back.

Good Luck
I know what ya mean. I'd be sure to get everything in writing to CMA!

All of the guys at this dealership seem to be pretty much straight shooters. I've done some asking around and research on the dealership and so far it's all been good. They've been around for a long time.

I agree that once I get this bike, nothin' will ever be the same again!

Thanks for the advice and help,

John
 

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The service plan is an up sell for the dealer (essentially free cash at the time of sale); they have a lot of "room" to move on the price. Keep saying no until he comes down to around a grand for the package; almost worth it at that price if you get the 7500 mi service in during the 3 years.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
The service plan is an up sell for the dealer (essentially free cash at the time of sale); they have a lot of "room" to move on the price. Keep saying no until he comes down to around a grand for the package; almost worth it at that price if you get the 7500 mi service in during the 3 years.
I have thought along those same lines too. I was thinking of proposing just the first three required services for $700. That seems pretty fair to me. Also, I'm thinking that if we agree on everything else & I threaten to walk, he might well cave and go for it.

I hope he isn't reading this! :eek:
 

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John

We service our bikes at home, but only after the 2 years is up! Up until then they have all gone to the dealership and yes, my Husband holds a mechanic's ticket - we could argue, but we don't bother. Its no biggie. See what you can negotiate on the maintenance deal you mentioned, but don't be afraid to own a Ducati - we have several and they are all good!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
John

We service our bikes at home, but only after the 2 years is up! Up until then they have all gone to the dealership and yes, my Husband holds a mechanic's ticket - we could argue, but we don't bother. Its no biggie. See what you can negotiate on the maintenance deal you mentioned, but don't be afraid to own a Ducati - we have several and they are all good!
Hey, thanks for the encouraging advice. It's kinda hard to lay out the $$$'s when you know you could do it yourself at least just as well for free.

Ride safe,

John
 

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You don't hear of too many catastrophic failures on this site...How many miles do you ride a year,,,Do you do long trips ? Think about where you go and what would you do if far away and something needed to be done say $500 worth of work , disrupt the trip ship it back to said dealership, and then continue ? If it was good anywhere I'd say yes ..What if the Particular dealership turns out to be didkheads and you don't see eye to eye ???Then you are stuck...

I say roll the dice and pass...

THIS IS A JOKE : If it does blow up that what fire insurance is for ..Good ole Flo at that annoying insurance company will cover your butt ,,she rides a 900 V-Twin

My opinion only
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
You don't hear of too many catastrophic failures on this site...How many miles do you ride a year,,,Do you do long trips ? Think about where you go and what would you do if far away and something needed to be done say $500 worth of work , disrupt the trip ship it back to said dealership, and then continue ? If it was good anywhere I'd say yes ..What if the Particular dealership turns out to be didkheads and you don't see eye to eye ???Then you are stuck...

I say roll the dice and pass...

THIS IS A JOKE : If it does blow up that what fire insurance is for ..Good ole Flo at that annoying insurance company will cover your butt ,,she rides a 900 V-Twin

My opinion only
I do about 18,000 or so miles a year including some touring, so I'd burn through the contract in about 2 years. The "selling dealership only" aspect is indeed a problem if it breaks on a trip, but then it would be a warranty issue and any dealership should fix it - IF there are any dealerships handy out in BFE? This is a service contract they're talking about and only covers scheduled maintenance anyway.

Still, I'm getting more skeptical the more I think about it.

PS: Good Ole Flo needs to get out of the office & get some sun - she looks like Vampire Girl to me!! :D
 

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The key to getting the best deal on anything -- bike, car, TV, whatever -- is to focus on buying one thing at a time. Dealers throw extended warranties, credit insurance, financing rates, etc., into the deal to muddy the waters and ultimately to make more money. Nothing wrong with that, of course, but consumers want to pay as little as possible. That's how capitalism works, right?

So, I'd focus on getting the best deal possible for the bike. Let's face it, it's a buyer's market out there, to say the least. I'm not a big believer in shopping a deal around to save $50 or $100 -- I tend to "buy" the dealer first (in other words, I'm comfortable with their service department, the people I'm dealing with, etc.), then negotiate my best deal on the bike. But in today's market -- bike sales are down nearly 50% -- you should be able to get a good deal on any bike at a dealership you're comfortable doing business with in the future.

As far as dealer-specific warranties, I'd avoid them. First off, while you may put 37,500 on your Ducati in two years, it's *extremely* rare for any Ducati to travel that many miles in it's entire lifetime. I'm parting out a 2001 996 right now with 28k on the clock because no one was interested in buying a used Ducati with "that many" miles. So the dealer knows 90% of the people they sell the service package to will never come close to using the five 7,500 services.

Another thing to consider with dealer-specific warranties is an alarming number of dealerships are either going out of business or are very close to the edge. I think we'll continue to see more going under over the next year or two, as whatever economic recovery we see is projected to be very slow. If your dealership goes out of business, the money you paid for the warranty is gone.

Lastly, as you yourself pointed out, the Moss-Magnusson Act clearly requires a manufacturer to honor the warranty as long as you can prove the required maintenance was performed. It doesn't have to be an authorized dealer. However, your dealer will clearly be more supportive of assisting you with warranty claims if the service work was done at their shop.

Good luck, and give us a report on the new Multi if/when you get it. It looks like a very cool bike.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
The key to getting the best deal on anything -- bike, car, TV, whatever -- is to focus on buying one thing at a time. Dealers throw extended warranties, credit insurance, financing rates, etc., into the deal to muddy the waters and ultimately to make more money. Nothing wrong with that, of course, but consumers want to pay as little as possible. That's how capitalism works, right?

So, I'd focus on getting the best deal possible for the bike. Let's face it, it's a buyer's market out there, to say the least. I'm not a big believer in shopping a deal around to save $50 or $100 -- I tend to "buy" the dealer first (in other words, I'm comfortable with their service department, the people I'm dealing with, etc.), then negotiate my best deal on the bike. But in today's market -- bike sales are down nearly 50% -- you should be able to get a good deal on any bike at a dealership you're comfortable doing business with in the future.

As far as dealer-specific warranties, I'd avoid them. First off, while you may put 37,500 on your Ducati in two years, it's *extremely* rare for any Ducati to travel that many miles in it's entire lifetime. I'm parting out a 2001 996 right now with 28k on the clock because no one was interested in buying a used Ducati with "that many" miles. So the dealer knows 90% of the people they sell the service package to will never come close to using the five 7,500 services.

Another thing to consider with dealer-specific warranties is an alarming number of dealerships are either going out of business or are very close to the edge. I think we'll continue to see more going under over the next year or two, as whatever economic recovery we see is projected to be very slow. If your dealership goes out of business, the money you paid for the warranty is gone.

Lastly, as you yourself pointed out, the Moss-Magnusson Act clearly requires a manufacturer to honor the warranty as long as you can prove the required maintenance was performed. It doesn't have to be an authorized dealer. However, your dealer will clearly be more supportive of assisting you with warranty claims if the service work was done at their shop.

Good luck, and give us a report on the new Multi if/when you get it. It looks like a very cool bike.
Thank you very much for taking the time to post this informative and insightful info.

After having time to give some serious thought to this matter I am becoming more and more angry at the fact that any manufacturer has the audacity to print a requirement in their warranty that is clearly and undeniably illegal. I'm becoming convinced that I actually want nothing to do with such a company, neither now nor in the future. I consider this to be a form of attempted extortion and I'll have no part of it.

I am, however, very interested in bringing this issue to the attention of the proper regulatory agency and I intend to pursue that objective as soon as I've done some more research.

Thank you again, Sir, for your helpful comments.

Ride safe,

John
 

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I would challenge you to show me where Ducati makes that statement anywhere.. the dealer you visited may have insinuated that but it doesn't come from the manufacturer. Generally buying a pre paid maintenance program will save you money if you use it but it has nothing to do with the manufacturer.
As far as maintenance costs go the word is Ducati will most likely announce longer service intervals on the new MTS1200 before it's release. Why not reserve the bike you want and when it arrives you can then decide if a maintenance contract if for you.


Thank you very much for taking the time to post this informative and insightful info.

After having time to give some serious thought to this matter I am becoming more and more angry at the fact that any manufacturer has the audacity to print a requirement in their warranty that is clearly and undeniably illegal. I'm becoming convinced that I actually want nothing to do with such a company, neither now nor in the future. I consider this to be a form of attempted extortion and I'll have no part of it.

I am, however, very interested in bringing this issue to the attention of the proper regulatory agency and I intend to pursue that objective as soon as I've done some more research.

Thank you again, Sir, for your helpful comments.

Ride safe,

John
 

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Having worked for a Ducati dealer, I can attest that the prepaid service/maintenance agreements are indeed a good value for the money, typically saving a good chunk of cash over paying for the services out of pocket. Additionally it provides peace of mind knowing that at every scheduled service interval you can simply take the bike in and have the service done and know you're not going to have to pay for it at that time. If you're financing the bike and have the service agreement put into the deal it's not likely to raise the monthly payment by much at all and again will ensure that your services are all covered. As for warranty issues, it'll be hard for Ducati to wiggle out of anything that comes up during the first two years of ownership, regardless of who does the maintenance. And if you buy an extended warranty through your dealer, make sure it's not an in-house warranty but is a warranty backed by a reputable warranty company such as Western. I've seen these warranties pay for themselves over and over again well after the oem warranty is expired. Bargain down on the bike and let the dealer make a bit of money in service and F&I and you'll both be happy.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I would challenge you to show me where Ducati makes that statement anywhere.. the dealer you visited may have insinuated that but it doesn't come from the manufacturer. Generally buying a pre paid maintenance program will save you money if you use it but it has nothing to do with the manufacturer.
As far as maintenance costs go the word is Ducati will most likely announce longer service intervals on the new MTS1200 before it's release. Why not reserve the bike you want and when it arrives you can then decide if a maintenance contract if for you.
First line, second paragraph under subheading in red "warranty"

http://www.ducati.com/en/bikes/service/service.jhtml
 

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First line, second paragraph under subheading in red "warranty"

http://www.ducati.com/en/bikes/service/service.jhtml
If you are indeed an auto technician and you already have mentioned your ubderstanding of the MM act then you should be able to interpret what is said. "In order to ensure warranty validity"
The only way to ensure warranty validity would be to have it done by an authorized dealer.
If you do it yourself and something fails Ducati NA will ask to see the record of maintenance history like ANY manufacturer of a motor vehicle would. If you can verify that all the work was done to specification and proper procedure was followed there would not be no issues on warranty coverage. Save your receipts, buy the needed special tools and study up..
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Having worked for a Ducati dealer, I can attest that the prepaid service/maintenance agreements are indeed a good value for the money, typically saving a good chunk of cash over paying for the services out of pocket. Additionally it provides peace of mind knowing that at every scheduled service interval you can simply take the bike in and have the service done and know you're not going to have to pay for it at that time. If you're financing the bike and have the service agreement put into the deal it's not likely to raise the monthly payment by much at all and again will ensure that your services are all covered. As for warranty issues, it'll be hard for Ducati to wiggle out of anything that comes up during the first two years of ownership, regardless of who does the maintenance. And if you buy an extended warranty through your dealer, make sure it's not an in-house warranty but is a warranty backed by a reputable warranty company such as Western. I've seen these warranties pay for themselves over and over again well after the oem warranty is expired. Bargain down on the bike and let the dealer make a bit of money in service and F&I and you'll both be happy.
Actually I am capable of doing all required service and inspections outlined in the mandatory service specs for this bike. I might in fact choose to take it to a dealership for some or possibly even all of these services, but my objection is to the wording in the warranty that I pulled up on the Ducati website that states that "to insure validity" of the warranty, the first 3 services must be performed at a dealership. Here's the link to that page/site:

http://www.ducati.com/en/bikes/service/service.jhtml

If I'm misinterpreting what it says, then I'm mistaken. But when I mentioned it to the salesman at the dealership, he said that that is indeed the case and offered me a service contract to "help offset the costs of the mandatory services". I believe that this is also in violation of the rules set fourth in the Moss-Magnusson act.

Anyway, that's what I was upset about.

Thanks for your response,

John
 

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Discussion Starter #19
If you are indeed an auto technician and you already have mentioned your ubderstanding of the MM act then you should be able to interpret what is said. "In order to ensure warranty validity"
The only way to ensure warranty validity would be to have it done by an authorized dealer.
If you do it yourself and something fails Ducati NA will ask to see the record of maintenance history like ANY manufacturer of a motor vehicle would. If you can verify that all the work was done to specification and proper procedure was followed there would not be no issues on warranty coverage. Save your receipts, buy the needed special tools and study up..
I am in fact an auto tech and also a licensed aircraft mechanic (A&P) and inspector (IA). I would have no problem at all doing all of the required scheduled maintenance, services and inspections and am well aware of the requirements and procedures for meticulous documentation, retention of receipts, use of approved checklists etc. that are associated with these activities.

I am in no way claiming that I would want to, or even be able to, tackle major repairs that require highly specialized tooling and training. I'm talking only about performing the maintenance tasks that are required for maintaining the warranty.

I see that you have interpreted the wording in the warranty statement in a different way than I did. To me it implies that if the work is not done by a dealer, then Ducati would consider the warranty invalid. It doesn't spell out any alternatives.

If my interpretation is incorrect, then I'm upset over nothing. The thing is that when I mentioned this to the dealer he confirmed it and offered me a service agreement for "the services that have to be done at the dealership".

That seems pretty straight forward to me.
 

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fwiw the ducati services may or can include checking the timing belt tension,checking oil pressure,setting tps-trim and balance of the cyl's.(along with a large amount of other things)all these operations need specific equiptment to be done.if you have the needed talent and tools,save your receipts and document your work.if not suck it up and pay to have the bike serviced as ducati expects.
 
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