Ducati.ms - The Ultimate Ducati Forum banner
  • Hey Everyone! Enter your bike HERE to be a part of this months Bike of the Month Challenge!

1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
253 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Here are the facts:

I have ordered a 2013 SF848
This is my first motorcycle

So here is what I was thinking and some questions;

I have already ordered some accessories like a Comp werks tail tidy, crg mirrors, speedymoto frame sliders, rizoma brake and clutch tanks, etc. just the asthetic stuff.

Will the DP termi slipons do the job? Or is the full system really worth the extra money for the difference between the two?

Is the exhaust really needed? I know they sound way cooler.

From people with experience does the combo of the slipons and the 14t front spr. make the bike too "crazy" (for the record i get that its all in the wrist but is it still predictable)

I intend to start out with slower around town riding at first then start going to different places as skill level increases but as I live near Edmonton, AB Canada, and mountain twisties are not very common.

I know some of the guys will say "just ride the thing" but that is not my nature so any help as I attempt to tinker with this new toy will help.

And a big thank you in advance!

And as a side note I have taken the rider safety coures and do have my liscence.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
498 Posts
First bike? Good luck out there...

Second, the best mod you can do is go get the suspension adjusted for your weight. It makes a tremendous difference in the bike, more than the $2K you can spend on the exhaust. I love my exhaust but I bought it for look and sound. The suspension setup actually made a huge difference and cost me all of $90.

14t sprocket makes the bike easier to roll on in 1st gear. Considering the price, it's definitely worth it.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,097 Posts
Usually aftermarket exhausts are Wanted, not Needed. Powerwise, in you shoes, I don't see the need to kick out the extra money for a full exhaust. Aesthetics and sound quality can be a great part of your motorcycling experience, so the slip-ons would be nice.

Its not going to be crazy with a 14t. The 14t just makes it smoother getting started.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
223 Posts
The slip on termis are loud enough.. I wouldn't go the full system for a couple of ponies... Soundwise the slip ons are just on the limit of tolerable loudness...

Regarding the extra mods..

Don't do the front sprocket yet.. the 848 can rev up easily once the "break-in" is done...

It really doesn't needs it.. plus it can make your beginner inputs worse while leaned since your wrist is not yet ready..

Do a track day.. it will give you a better skills and the biggest grin you can achieve on a bike, plus you'll learn your brakes, and the bike...

Remember.. no ABS means if you panic stop, and don't know how to brake.. you'll definitely go down..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
First bike? Good luck out there...

Second, the best mod you can do is go get the suspension adjusted for your weight.
I am new to the motorcycle scene, was wondering how do you know what is right for your weight? :confused:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
253 Posts
Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Yes thank you all so far for the replies. To us who are newbs to this sport these types of threads are invaulable.

The suspension was to be adjusted as soon as I get the bike. After reading a few books already I learned that preload and rebound/compression dampening are paramount when it come to how the bike behaves.

I have also wonders if we can swap the lower handlebar yolk with the one that is used on the SFS and then add the steering dampener bracket near the tank to add a dampener for the 848? What do you guys think?

Thanks for all the replies so far. Excellent advice for the newbs out there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
Here are the facts:

I have ordered a 2013 SF848
This is my first motorcycle

So here is what I was thinking and some questions;

I have already ordered some accessories like a Comp werks tail tidy, crg mirrors, speedymoto frame sliders, rizoma brake and clutch tanks, etc. just the asthetic stuff.

Will the DP termi slipons do the job? Or is the full system really worth the extra money for the difference between the two?

Is the exhaust really needed? I know they sound way cooler.

From people with experience does the combo of the slipons and the 14t front spr. make the bike too "crazy" (for the record i get that its all in the wrist but is it still predictable)

I intend to start out with slower around town riding at first then start going to different places as skill level increases but as I live near Edmonton, AB Canada, and mountain twisties are not very common.

I know some of the guys will say "just ride the thing" but that is not my nature so any help as I attempt to tinker with this new toy will help.

And a big thank you in advance!

And as a side note I have taken the rider safety coures and do have my liscence.
To start off, I wouldn't worry about a full system. As already stated, that is for someone looking for max performance. Slipons are perfect for the sound/aesthetics and performance.

Next, it is good to see your head is in the right place with riding. You already did the MSF, which I recommend to everyone. In addition, you already have a solid plan that you should follow. Definitely take it easy drive around neighborhoods, low traffic areas and take it easy until you are familiar with the bike. Also, always keep in mind that no matter how good "you think" you are, the bike will still wreck the same by over estimating your skills.

One last thing invest in good gear. Helmet, gloves, jacket, and boots minimum. I know it isn't as cool as a t-shirt and gym shorts, but road rash sucks. Stay safe and have fun.

P.s. I have to do the mandatory ribbing. Boy, why not get a real mans SF. The 1098 is the real SF and stuff...Zzzzz :rolleyes:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,384 Posts
To the OP. I'm mentioning this since you're new to motorcycles. The term dampening is wrong in relation to suspension. It's compression and rebound DAMPING and steering damper.


Sent from my iPhone using Motorcycle
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
253 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Yes that is a good point that the right gear is deffinantly worth its weight in skin. My minister of war and finance mandated that Helmet (shoei rf-1100) jacket with extra spine protector, gloves, pants and boots were not an option.

Spring 2013 is going to be very intresting...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
225 Posts
Save your money on a full system, slip-ons are more than good enough, and the extra power from a full system is negligible.

My best buy for my SF, suspension set up by a pro. Worth every penny and cost nearly nothing.

Second best investment, clutch slave. I went DP, but take your choice. Lightens the clutch and makes changing gear a smoother process by far.

And finally if your money allows a slipper clutch. The lazy way to down shift. You would have to look at a wet slipper or convert to a dry, but worth the extra pennies and saved my arse a couple of times. Remember traction control is not the same as a slipper, and with both fitted your safety just increased.

After these I went mad with aesthetics. Enjoy!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
I am new to the motorcycle scene, was wondering how do you know what is right for your weight? :confused:
Usually sag is set for about 30-35mm for street. 25mm-30mm for track.

Measuring/setting sag is usually a two man/woman job. My wife helps me set my sag to my weight. I have mine at 30mm front/rear.

Front sag is easy to measure with a zip tie and a front stand that lifts from under the triple rather than the forks. You need the forks to be able to fully extend off the ground with no weight on them.

Rear sag is easy too...measure from the same point from the center of the rear axle nut to a stationary point on the rear. I usually prop my bike on the kick stand where the rear tire is off the ground so my wife can measure the rear fully extended.

Keep adjusting preload until you reach the setting you want.

Rebound is generally okay to be the same for street and track. Not very scientific, but if you push down on the bike, you want it to rebound within a second. You don't want it to spring up too fast and go down and then back up. You also don't want it to rebound too slow (takes longer than a second)

Compression, I usually start at the half way mark and pick a good road and bring your tools with you. Ride the same route over and over and over again and play with compression. Once you find a good setting, keep going until the bike does not feel good, then dial it back to the setting you felt most confident with.

This is really really basic what I wrote..best to do research and read about this from credible and reputable suspension tuners/gurus. I'm still learning and not fully sure what I'm doing often times.

Another general rule is if the bike understeers usually the the front is too stiff or the rear is too soft and squats under accel. If the front is too soft (dives too much when you brake) and the rear is too stiff, it can turn in too quickly.

Lastly, tire pressures can also make a huge difference in handling/ride characteristics.

-Ray
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,395 Posts
I am new to the motorcycle scene, was wondering how do you know what is right for your weight? :confused:
in my "OPINION" ride your bike for a couple mos and get used to riding. you wont know the difference between good suspension and bad suspension being your still learning to ride. then exhaust or suspension and you will find your self saying "those guys were right". I would just worry about not dropping my new precious baby for the first month or so;)

BTW congrats bout making one of the best decisions in motorcycling by getting a duc!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16,908 Posts
One last thing invest in good gear. Helmet, gloves, jacket, and boots minimum. I know it isn't as cool as a t-shirt and gym shorts, but road rash sucks. Stay safe and have fun.
+1

Get some good, comfortable and stylish gear that will last and that you will want to wear every time you get on the bike.

Some of my gear has outlasted several bikes - so don't skimp here.

Good gear and skills will allow a happy new rider to become a happy old rider.

-M
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,287 Posts
Beyond what has been already been said about having great gear, start getting as much seat time as possible. Experience is priceless. Be conservative and very aware, and go have fun.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
253 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
Thanks for all the replies and advice. I intend to follow all of it about the gear and taking it easy for the first little while. This forum is awesome!
 

·
Blame the universe not the tank!
Joined
·
3,234 Posts
FlyingQ and Moto have great advice ^^^^^

My thoughts on suspension would be that you need the bike to be set up for your weight and riding level.

The stock suspension is set up for (IMHO) someone who weighs at least 180lbs. I always felt that I was riding a brick since I weighed about 165lbs.

I didn't mess with suspension until almost a year into the bike... In retrospect I think I should have addressed that sooner. My solution ended up being swapping the front springs to a lighter version and swapping out the rear for a TTX. Yes it cost money to do it, but it ended up for me as being the quickest fix to swap out the front springs and the rear shock.

Afterwards I was rewarded with a bike that responded to my weight, THEN you can fine tune the compression and rebound. If the spring rate is not correct, you cannot (again IMHO) dial in suspension that is not for your weight or riding ability.

Best of luck with the bike. Take it easy, I mean REAL easy. Get to know the bike. It's a relationship that you don't rush, it matures with time and you cannot buy a fix for getting to know a bike. And frankly the time you do spend getting familiar is an exciting enjoyable phase of bike ownership.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
223 Posts
One thing that I have not seen posted, but I know from taking the MSF course it has been covered, is that you are basically invisible to people. Always be aware of what is around you. There are several threads on here about close calls and some where the calls were more than close.

Great decision on the bike and keep the rubber side down. These bikes are a blast!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
134 Posts
in my "OPINION" ride your bike for a couple mos and get used to riding. you wont know the difference between good suspension and bad suspension being your still learning to ride. then exhaust or suspension and you will find your self saying "those guys were right". I would just worry about not dropping my new precious baby for the first month or so;)

BTW congrats bout making one of the best decisions in motorcycling by getting a duc!
Agree with this , do not touch suspension yet , get comfortable with it ride it in different type of road and traffic . Breath when you ride your bike , try to be relax not stiff .
Get confident when you park the bike , most of my minor fail happen at parking area .
Having the same model if start again from scrap, my first move will be
Save clutch really improving shifting comfort .
14 front if you are in urban environment .
Take your time to be sure to enjoy many more ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,504 Posts
and never park facing even slightly downhill (unless in gear) or it can easily roll off the stand and bust a few things...happened to me!
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top