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The nut shouldn't change because you will still be using the same clutch centre shaft. so you will use your original nut. Good point on the push rod. The later push rods were a different length. The need for the different length rod (about 10mm) was mostly to accommodate the different position and type of clutch slave cylinder used on later bikes. If you use your original push rod I suspect i anything you may only need a 2.5 to 3mm longer push rod to accommodate for the deeper hub of the later bikes. The simple way to achieve this is to insert a short rod of 2.5 to 3mm inside the slave cylinder. When you fit a later model slave cylinder to an early model bike you either stick in a short 10mm rod or some people even insert a ball bearing into the slave cylinder.
Thanks - looks like it is worth taking the risk. I will scout around again for SBK parts.
 

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Thanks - looks like it is worth taking the risk. I will scout around again for SBK parts.
Richard, what do you perceive is the advantage of using a SBK hub?

Why not just use your original hub, or an aftermarket one?

The original hubs seldom wear out although the rubber cushions tween the steel insert and alloy body certainly give up after a few years and are admittedly expensive to replace.

If you need one I have the NGR non slipper ergal replacement hubs in stock, which are a pound of butter lighter than the OEM assembly. (Provides a good performance gain)

If you want to give me a call I should be able to answer most of your questions in a couple of minutes.
 

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punch what do you perceive is the advantage of using a SBK hub?
I need new hub and basket. My 900 plates are fine. I also have brand new Newfren plates for a SBK.

Difference is price of new 900 items as opposed to price of "unwanted" SBK items that are gathering dust!

Nothing more than trying to save money as I have 3 reno projects consuming or about to consume funds and another (free) project will be arriving in a day or so. I can't resist!

As with NZ, winter is coming so more time to "experiment" I also usually have a bike on loan in the shed from Rapid Bikes magazine here in Oz. Currently a hotted up Yam R15, which is a hoot to ride.

Richard
 

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Well that certainly makes sense. Next time I fit a slipper clutch I will see if the owner will let me keep the old hub for you.
 

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Hey Punch
I can vouch for the NGR clutch's as well have just fitted one to my bike 92 900ss and it is great a lot more responsive and the handling feels great.
 

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Im real close to pulling the trigger on the motowheels slipper complete kit. My bike has 44kon the original. Buy the time I change it all out the slipper kit is only a couple bucks more.
 

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Wobblyas, can you give more details about the clutch rubbers. I have a 93 900SS with about 60k km. The clutch is pretty noisey even with good clearances between the plates and clutch parts. This may be the reason.

Oh, and what the hell is Ergal?
 

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Wobblyas, can you give more details about the clutch rubbers. I have a 93 900SS with about 60k km. The clutch is pretty noisey even with good clearances between the plates and clutch parts. This may be the reason.

Oh, and what the hell is Ergal?
Ergal is the common trade name for 7075-T6 alloy. It is a very hard wearing but light weight alloy suitable for use where high ductility is not a requirement. It can be readily hard anodized. It does not readily accept being anodized in light or bright colours though. Oh and items made of Ergal have a very low harmonic frequency compared to steel meaning that they won't 'ring' like a tuning fork when you strike them with another piece of metal. A near perfect material for clutch baskets and hubs.

The clutch rubbers are fitted into the back of the standard OEM clutch hub/drum. You can test the wear in your clutch rubbers as per the manual I wrote for NGR if you need a copy email me. No one ever bothers to replace them.

Neither slipper clutches or NGR's superLight clutch hubs use rubbers. slipper clutches smooth aggressive down changes. And if you are smooth with your gear changes as most enthusiasts are you won't notice the absence of them. I have no rubbers in the NGR clutch fitted in my bike and I don't notice their Absense.

I have fitted many of the NGR clutches, we import and distribute them in New Zealand and Australia, to customer bikes and no one has ever commented they could feel a lack of them.

Steel baskets and friction plates were standard in your bike. Steel baskets and clutch plates (rather than the later alloy ones used by Ducati and nearly all after market suppliers) are by far the biggest contributor to noisy Ducati clutches. The change in volume and sound when you change to a modern alloy clutch is night and day.

Noise in your clutch: Do you have a steel or alloy clutch basket?
Are your friction plates steel or alloy backed?
 

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Have a Corsa clutch with ally friction discs. On my bench is a 900SSie which I'm working my way through. Just bought an Ally clutch basket from Italy and I was looking at an 'Ergal' clutch inner. My plan for the whole bike is to lighten things as much as my finances will allow. The main item will be a lighter battery and after that I thought to concentrate on rotating masses. Wish I could afford some carbon fibre wheels. What are your thoughts on a Nicolls flywheel for street use?
 

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Have a Corsa clutch with ally friction discs. On my bench is a 900SSie which I'm working my way through. Just bought an Ally clutch basket from Italy and I was looking at an 'Ergal' clutch inner. My plan for the whole bike is to lighten things as much as my finances will allow. The main item will be a lighter battery and after that I thought to concentrate on rotating masses. Wish I could afford some carbon fibre wheels. What are your thoughts on a Nicolls flywheel for street use?
Fitting the alloy basket will greatly reduce the sound volume of your clutch. The Ergal hub is a good upgrade - keep in mind that if you ever upgrade to something like the NGR slipper clutch you can reuse your alloy plates and baskets to keep the upgrade costs down but you throw away (sell on ebay) that alloy hub. The slipper clutch hub mech which is also made of ergal is slightly heavier than the Ergal hub but once you have ridden with a slipper clutch you will never want to ride without one again.

Have a look at the Ultrabatts one of the best lithium batteries on the market as they include an internal BMS which other brands do not. Have a look on my web site under 'batteries' for technical details on the advantages of an inbuilt BMS. I would never stick a Lithium battery in a bike without an inbuilt BMS, Just dumb and potentially catastrophic. (Unless you are running it as a total loss system and charging it only from mains power via an external BMS.)

I saved 4.3Kgs from the weight of my bike by using an Ultrabatt 400LITE. Batteries however are not rotating mass. Lightening flywheels and clutch components will have a much greater better effect on performance per kg removed and give you more bang for your buck.

Never tried a Nichols flywheel on the street but I lighten the stock ones to about 1kg which seems about the right compromise to me .....and as we have a lathe in the workshop it is very cheap to do. I guess it depends on what you use the bike for and what compromises in comfort and smoothness you are willing to tolerate.

Hope this helps.
 

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Never tried a Nichols flywheel on the street but I lighten the stock ones to about 1kg which seems about the right compromise to me .....and as we have a lathe in the workshop it is very cheap to do. I guess it depends on what you use the bike for and what compromises in comfort and smoothness you are willing to tolerate.

Hope this helps.
A Nichols flywheel on the street is fun fun fun.

The lighter clutch components saving 3 lbs or so is another great way to save weight. It's worth it even if the original clutch isn't worn out in my opinion. Mine is showing some problems with less than 10,000 on it, so I'm thinking of upgrading.
 

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am i the only one that likes the loud clutch? I LOVE it.
It distinguishes our bikes from all others out there...
I LOVE pulling up to a light next to a Hardley Ableson and watching the RUBs face when he hears my SS 900 ei rattle and tick next to him or her. Not a single one will bother to ask or say anything at the standard length light, they tend to ignore me. But if stationary for more than a few minuets they look at me and say something like, "Hey dude, can you hear that?" and point at my motor. I just give them the age old sign of I can't hear you... ( hand to side of head and shake my head.) I get the RUBs every time.

Old dog...

P.S. I guess I better explain RUBs. Rich Urban Bikers. RUBs. $20 grand and 200 miles a rider does not make.


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Adige Clutch plates

Hi

I just installed an 'ADIGE' clutch plate kit on my DUC 900 SS from 1997, took me 20 min. in total, paid 122 € for a full set (friction + plain plates) incl. shipment from Italy to Belgium.
checkout ADIGE, they are the manufacturer from the old Vespa clutches, and have a full range of other clutch kits, incl. slipperies etc.

I got mine from www.nextbike.com, very good service

I will report back on quality, I have not ridden her since I found she has an oil leak while working on the clutch...

Jens
 

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Leeland... Don't feign deafness... Tell them its a diesel and watch the look on their face, its either shock, or the best is "ah, yes of course" I even heard a guy in my local ask his mate if those diesel engined Ducatis were fast.
 

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Leeland... Don't feign deafness... Tell them its a diesel and watch the look on their face, its either shock, or the best is "ah, yes of course" I even heard a guy in my local ask his mate if those diesel engined Ducatis were fast.
Umm... This I got to try !!! Thanks for the idea, that one I will be glad to carry on, just to see if it will fly here in Texas or not. Some of these Texans don't take well to being fooled... F($k 'm Hehehe...

Old Dog...


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Why not just tell 'em it's a dry clutch :think:?
You miss the fun in goofing with the wanna-be riders. Those coffee shop heroes who own twenty thousand dollar motorcycles and ride them 200 miles a year and know all there is to know about every bike rolling. RUBs. Got to love the RUBs. What would we do without them.

Old Dog...


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Resurrecting an age old question, but times have changed

I feel so stupid as I have been concerned about all the threads about steel plates and alloy baskets and hubs and wear and suitability

yes I have searched and researched!

The stupid part is that finally looking at some images, it dawned on me that some alloy baskets have steel "inserts" that bear the brunt/impact of steel plates.
Obviously (now to me) they provide light weight, but durability of steel.
I am not that concerned about light weight, just parts that work.

I have a fairly new full set of Newfren steel plates, where they are sintered (steel) not organic (aluminium)

To me the next challenge is to find a hub that will suit steel plates.
Lots of reading and research and none the wiser!

I just want to source and buy a hub, steel, hard anodised or whatever that will work with steel plates.

Barnett seem to do the basket with steel inserts, but there may be other options.
Just not sure what hub would suit my steel plates.

Any help/genuine experience appreciated.
 

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Punch
Outside of a slipper inner clutch hub and a cush drive less version I do not know there would be any change from a oem unit inner hub. I do not think I would remove the inner hub cush unit as it helps protect the gearbox, though a slipper clutch also protects the gearbox from damage.

I am NOT a fan of dry slipper clutches on the street as they often chatter more when you are trying to pull from a stop and in theory most road riders do not gain much by having the slipper so it can more bling than benefit with a touch of pain in the ass added for good measure. Higher maintenance as well as the more you use the slipper function the more the plates wear so you need to re-stack more often.

Sintered metal frictions exist because of slipper clutches so they last longer between re-stacking the slipper but IIRC they are all steel backed ( and in aluminum outer baskets). The problem with them is they are also much more prone to chatter when you are pulling away so you gain longevity of the friction material over oem but also gain PIA in stop and go usage. Since I often see non slipper oem friction materials go 50,000 miles without wearing out I see no reason to not run oem plates. This also allows you to run later style aluminum backed plates so wear will in theory be lessened, I am not sure it works out that way in reality from my experience. I do not see one versions tabs lasting that much longer than the others so they do not appear to make much difference in anything but sound.

I have sold a few of the Barnet outer baskets but simply have not seen them back with enough miles to say if they are better or worse than a conventional basket. I would have preferred the basket had steel inserts that could vary in thickness so as they wore the tabs you could tighten the stack back up. Instead they are riveted in thin strips of what looks like spring steel so I do not know how they last long term.

In all I often recommend finding a superbike guy that has installed a slipper in his low mile bike and buy his old (mostly new) whole clutch assembly for less than a new oem pack. If you buy from a pre 1098 it is a drop in and aluminum basket and plates as well if you care. After that oem clutch packs and outer baskets are pretty interchangeable pick what you can get a good deal on and you like the looks/sound of.
 

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Ducvet is, of course, correct and is based on years of experience.

I just went through this myself, I'll add some stuff I found from doing it for the first time and approaching it like you. I picked up a Ducabike roller-hub slipper with an aluminum basket and pressure plate for very little money (less than the cost of just buying the Ducabike basket new!) with low mileage usage, but it needed a clutch pack. Thus my search for data began.

As you know, there are three types of basket material - Steel, Aluminum, and Hybrid. Aluminum baskets get aluminum plates, steel baskets and baskets with steel inserts get steel plates. Otherwise the material hardness is disparate enough that you get accelerated wear on one or the other. Usually it's someone installing steel friction plates in an aluminum basket and wearing grooves in the basket. You can extend the life of a basket like this by re-stacking the plates and swapping the convex plate to the other end of the stack - this offsets the pack by one plate width to get the frictions aligned with the non-worn portion of the drum. You might extend the life of the basket by about 25% by doing this and it will definitely make the whole thing quieter.

The OEM hub and steel drive plates showed no significant signs of wear when I took mine out. Stick with the OEM hub unless you have a specific need to change. Your replacement kit should come with steel drive plates, usually they are OEM drive plates.

So it's a matter of matching plate backer to the basket, and friction material you choose. Unless you have a specific need for sintered (slipper clutch, racing application, etc) get the organic material.

In my case, aluminum basket with a slipper hub, I picked up a set of sintered aluminum plates, Ducabike makes them and they were priced lower than some of the other brands out there when I ordered them from Bellisimoto. I don't know that they are better or worse than any other, but they were specified for my clutch by the manufacturer. Haven't felt any chatter on them yet, they felt just like normal. Some people swear by Barnett, others swear off Barnett before you even say their name. Surflex is another brand to look at, and others.

Really, you can't go wrong with OEM plates, and I believe you can get them in steel or aluminum depending on the part number. Ask at your local parts counter, or if they aren't able to help (as some dealers seem to be) try calling the Motocorsa parts counter in Portland, Oregon - Marc and Miles have always been excellent to me.
 
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