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Discussion Starter #1
......OR, how I spent about $1.25 per mile to ride a Ducati.

I have this "thing" for unusual motorcycles. If it's rare, unique, ugly, semi-ugly, or just plain not run of the mill then that's the motorcycle for me! At one point I owned two of the rarest production motorcycles ever imported to the U.S.: a '92 BMW K1 and the subject of this thread, a '92 907ie - BLACK!!

Here's the story, sometime back in '03 I was looking to add to my stable and stumbled upon an image for a Yamaha GT 1000. Wow, talk about a rare/unique/ugly or semi-ugly bike! I liked it. Doing some research on the model I discovered that the Yamaha GT 1000 Owner's Club of America was holding a rally in Frisco, Colorado, about 120 miles from me so I decided to ride up and see these unusual beasts in person. I got there, was impressed but ended up backing away. These boogers were the rarest of the rare and made of serious unobtanium. Even I'm not as stoopid to buy something like that.

Or am I?

A New Hampshire-based moto-buddy sent me a link to a most unusual bike for sale in suburban Birmingham, Alabama. I clicked on the link and it was love at first sight, the aforementioned 907ie. After some email dialogue with the seller I arranged for a member of the local BMW motorcycle club to visit and inspect the bike. He called me and said (this is a verbatim quote) "If you don't buy this bike, I will!"

Well, well, well, that was all I needed to know. The deal was consummated and shipping arrangements made with me having the 907 shipped directly to the local Ducati dealer who'd just taken on the brand at its established BMW location. A few weeks later the bike arrived and that's when the fun began.

The service manager called to give me the bad news. The fuel tank's internal's were toast due to what I later found out to be the result of the 907 being stored with fuel in a covered but open garage in the southeast.


I said a Hail Mary and waited for more bad news to arrive. I wasn't disappointed. The tank had some pinhole leaks, a rusted chain, dead battery, dry rotted tires, and God knows what else. And that was just the beginning.






To be continued.....:surprise:
 

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Looking forward to the rest of this! I've got a 907ie and think it's one of the prettiest bikes I've seen.
Glad that my tank didn't look like that though!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
This one's for those of you who like nasty photos of fuel tanks.


Around the time I was getting all this bad news I started thinking of the total f*****g moron who offered to check out the Paso. I mean, really, who inspects a bike and doesn't report back simple things, simple observations, etc., to the interested party?? I decided to let it go and move forward with the work at hand.

I joined the now defunct Paso.org forum and lurked a while before asking for guidance on the possible purchase. It was through this site I later learned of a member who did lots of motorcycle paint and general restoration work. His specialty is BMW bikes and since he also owned a 907 I felt comfortable seeking his help on getting the fuel tank fixed. After a few conversations I shipped the tank to him at his Connecticut address and he went to work on its internals using a proprietary process to remove rust and coat the tank. It took two months to get it back but it was worth the wait.

In the interim I began sourcing parts wherever I could. Gowanloch was phenominal to work with! They supplied a new set of coolant hoses and clamps as did a Duc dealer in Seattle. I even bought a few extra parts (tried to corner the market so to speak) because the more parts I sought the more I learned that Ducati wasn't making 907 parts anymore so whatever a dealer had I bought!



My relationship with the BMW & Ducati dealership was unique. I was a well known and established customer and they were just kicking off their partnership with Ducati NA and were eager to have my bike to work on. Their lead BMW mechanic also did a stint at a Ducati dealer in another state and was well versed on the 907. They even allowed me to come in and do a little work on it myself using the parts they weren't able to source. Yea, I know that sounds strange but they weren't eager to spend man hours on their parts manager getting unobtanium parts they most likely will never need.

More later.......
 

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That is because you have the last one in the free world... :D
No, there's been one on CL in my area for the last 2+ years that's been painted a hideous electric blue color and bastardized in many other ways with "minor electrical issues" that keep it from starting. Waiting for it to hit $100 and maybe I'll pick it up, although my wife would kill me if I brought another bike home that doesn't run...
 

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Discussion Starter #9
That is because you have the last one in the free world... :D
Okay Mister Smarty Pants. If you take the time to read my signature you'll notice that it's not listed. :p

I'll eventually post more about my other experiences and it's eventual disposition.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
there's a nice tricolore paso on CL in my town right now - $4K
It seems like there's never ending line of folks here who like to act as enablers when it comes to spending my money. I had PLENTY of helpers when I was interested in a 1000DS SS and now it's in my garage. :laugh:
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Parts started coming in from all over the US and several foreign countries including Australia, Scotland, and Texas. By now the fuel tank had arrived at the paint shop in Connecticut and that's when I got a call from the owner telling me it'll take longer to repair the tank than previously estimated. It had lots of pin hole leaks which would take more time to mitigate but he guaranteed me that I'd be happy with the end result, he was right. Being a 907 owner himself, he was a font of wisdom on how to troubleshoot certain components.

Getting into it..




I/we would work on it for a while then step away until more parts (and cash) appeared. The fuel tank restoration was coming along nicely which really lifted my spirits. Riding season was but two months away and there was much work still to be done.
 

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Discussion Starter #19 (Edited)
If and when you get it on the road, I think you should name it Lazarus.
Or Frankenstein. 0:)
This is an old story. The 907 was resurrected, ridden, loved, admired, yelled at, took more money out of my wallet, and then sold ten years ago. I'm just recollecting my experience if for nothing else but to breathe some life into what otherwise is a dormant segment of this forum.
 
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