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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Looking to pick up a sport touring bike before my planned bike trip in just a couple weeks.

I have been looking at a couple ST's from various manufactures this past week and really want to pull the trigger on one this week to give me enough time to get it inspected, serviced, tagged and titled before the trip.

I am looking to spend around 7k for it, and have found a few bikes in my area in that price range.

Out of the Mulitstradas, the years I have found in my price range (not extensively searching, like literally just today) were 2010 to 2012. All with under 20k miles on them.

Is there a big difference between the 2010,2011, and 2012?

Any help would be greatly appreciated.
 

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@CinKo
In my honest opinion, any of those bikes mentioned in the first edition of your post will do the job. I'd pick a Japanese for the low maintenance cost.
Reason being is that I just didn't feel any passion based on what you wrote originally.
It's the passion that drove me to buy the Multi. I can equally say the same for the Monster.
What I read (in your pre-edited draft) was a need not a want.
Have I misinterpreted what you were saying as your shortened post is now completely different than your original long version?
 
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Passion should be important in choosing to own an Italian bike... otherwise you may find yourself regretting it pretty quickly. Part of the reason for that is that they're expensive to own and they can be finicky... and you need to feel that your money is well spent or it'll just annoy you and ruin your experience with the bike.

I'd say your budget of $7k makes me worry - it means you're price conscious and maybe need to stretch your dollars a bit. There's nothing wrong with that... most of us have been there (I sure have been)... but it makes me think that bang for your buck is going to be important. Japanese bikes are often hard to beat for "bang for the buck"... both in purchase price as well as operating cost.

If you wrench on your bikes yourself and are comfortable with that then this doesn't apply as much (though materials can be expensive too) - but if you take your bike to a shop for routine maintenance then you really need to factor that in... I figured it out for a thread a week or two ago but I think I spend on average around $1500/year (which is about 7 months long here in NY) for routine maintenance and consumables on my Multi (tires, chains, desmo service, oil service...) and I've spent even more than that per year on farkles (wheels, rapidbike evo, pipe, tire pressure monitor, other electronic gizmos, carbon fiber bits). Stuff for this bike is expensive.

So - think about the whole package and what really fits your needs and wants (and abilities and budget).
 

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Keep in mind the valve adjustment is at 15k miles, which is often around the time guys sell them. It's a significant expense if you take it to the dealer, unless you're mechanically capable of performing it yourself.
The initial investment isn't what's draining; that's the easy part frankly. It's the running costs that really add up. My previous bike was a Yamaha FZ-06 and I could buy all the parts for an oil change at Autozone for <$40 and do it in my garage in 30 minutes.

I did a search for 2010-2014 Multi's within 400 miles on Cycle Trader, and the cheapest one was $6900 and had 28k miles. The average is about $10k. Considering that's the bottom of your price range, I would suggest getting something else that aligns more with your budget. There's always going to be insurance, registration, maintenance, gear, farkles, etc. to consume any left over cash. I'd hate to see you buy the cheapest one available and then have to shell out a couple grand for an issue that popped up.
For around $7k I'd recommend a FJ-09. You can find used ones around $6-7k with 5k miles. The triple is a good midrange engine and they're reliable and have much cheaper running costs.

I can say my right side brain really loves the Multi as an emotional experience, but the left side brain constantly points out all the pitfalls of Ducati ownership:
You have to take it to the dealer to reset the oil service light? What do you mean an oil change is $180 and I have to wait 4 hours? I can do it in my garage for $60 and a half hour if it weren't for the resetting the damn light!
You spent how much and they still can't get a fuel gauge to work? Wait, the fuel gauge brake AGAIN!?
What do you mean Italy is on shutdown the entire month of August? I have to wait an entire month to get parts?

If Yamaha or Honda could make a competitor to the Multi that had some character I would go back in a heart beat.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks guys for the feedback, let me start with the reason I shortened my first post, I realized I wrote a dang novel for a thread post and didnt want to waste anyones time trying to go through that all, when all I really want to know is my best options for sport touring bikes...and as this is a ducati forum, just wanted to switch right to the basics and ask about the multistrada.

Personally I do work in my own bikes, I've done tear downs and rebuilds before, so I'm not to terribly worried... the issue in this stage in my life is I'm more time restrained then any thing else. My budget is my immediate cash at hand "approved" for another bike. Not that I will be strapped when it comes to service cost.

I really just cant find that perfect bike I want... and I think trying to rush this decision before the trip may in fact be the worst way to start it.

Honestly I'm now thinking I may just rent something and verify if that's what I want to buy or not. The sport touring field is new to me and quite frankly the options are overwhelming.
 

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2012. All the niggles from the first two years were worked out.
 

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@CinKo
Given you already own a Ducati 916, a sport tourer is a nice offset.
From a purely economical perspective without passion or emotion, I'd take a Yamaha 900 FJ-09.
BTW, I liked your original long post.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
@CinKo
Given you already own a Ducati 916, a sport tourer is a nice offset.
From a purely economical perspective without passion or emotion, I'd take a Yamaha 900 FJ-09.
BTW, I liked your original long post.
Lol and yes fj-09 is a good bike, and there are plenty set up already in my price point... I actually only excluded this bike because it's my friends bike who I ride with and I'm doing the trip with him. I'm a bit opposite to the fact that I actually don't want something other people have... but maybe in this case I have to revisit the thought of that bike as a good option.
 

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In my opinion, the Multistrada isn't a true sport touring bike when compared to something like a Yamaha FJR for instance. It is definitely more on the sport side than the tour side for a couple of reasons when compared to those other type of bikes.

My previous bike was a Yamaha FJR 1300 and it was a great sport touring bike with more "touring" blood than the Multistrada. While the Multi has good ergonomics, the FJR was setup for long hauls with the electronically adjustable windshield and the adjustable seat, all it really needed was some highway pegs.

That said, the reason I went with the Multi is because it is sportier, lighter, and more fun to ride. If I was doing more touring, I'd probably try to get back into something like the FJR.

As far as maintenance costs go, I am not super mechanical. But with the help of a buddy, we just did the 15,000 mile service on my bike and 45,000 service on his. It was pretty straight forward and cost us about $250 for each bike.
 

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I just cam off a Victory Magnum bagger. Great touring bike but I was missing the ability to hit the corners better. I still looked at the FJR/Connie/etc because I still need to tour and occasionally 2up but in the end they were all heavy tourers that bordered on sport and I didn't like the looks of any of them (no heart attachment). So I went with the Multi. Still new to me so I can't comment other than that but those are my reasons for purchase.
 

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At 650 lbs the Yamaha FJR 1300 is as sporty as a Goldwing or an RV on two wheels. Although it is marketed as "Sport Touring", one has to wonder how is that any sporty?
The "sport" label implies nimbleness at the very least. "Sport" is a bike you could theoretically bring to the track. Not that you should of course, contingent on the bike. "Sport Touring" in the true sense of the words implies a "Sporty" bike for light getaways as opposed to a "touring bike" which can carry the luggage of a family of four.
 
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The main thing is get the bike you want , the Multi is a fun exciting bike that has alot of character and is impossible to duplicate.
 

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In my opinion, the Multistrada isn't a true sport touring bike when compared to something like a Yamaha FJR for instance. It is definitely more on the sport side than the tour side for a couple of reasons when compared to those other type of bikes.

My previous bike was a Yamaha FJR 1300 and it was a great sport touring bike with more "touring" blood than the Multistrada. While the Multi has good ergonomics, the FJR was setup for long hauls with the electronically adjustable windshield and the adjustable seat, all it really needed was some highway pegs.

That said, the reason I went with the Multi is because it is sportier, lighter, and more fun to ride. If I was doing more touring, I'd probably try to get back into something like the FJR.

As far as maintenance costs go, I am not super mechanical. But with the help of a buddy, we just did the 15,000 mile service on my bike and 45,000 service on his. It was pretty straight forward and cost us about $250 for each bike.
I think touring chops depend on the kind of touring too... so folks need to think about how they intend to use the bike. I found the Multi to be a near perfect touring bike... for the way I tour. I'll ride 15 hours a day for a week without touching a divided highway... but what I WILL do is spend a day of that week barreling down dirt roads. The FJR is too big, heavy, and lacks the suspension to be a touring solution for me... but when I DID spend a day on I90 knocking out 900 miles on the Multi I pretty quickly learned the shortcomings of the Multi on slab (wind control is crap, light weight is a downside on expressways)... I'd not own a Multi if I was a slab rider.
 
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You may also want to consider the BMW K1300S. Even though they discontinued this model, it is very fast, comfortable, shaft drive, and is a good looking bike IMO. It will definitely be in your price range. It has a long wheel base that makes it stable at high speeds and on the highway but is also slow to turn in and is heavier than the MTS.
There's lots of good bikes out there. Best of luck
 

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Buy the FJ and you will always wonder what it be like to own a Duc :)
LOL. Good point. I keep trying to warm up to the Tracer 900 GT as a possible, eventual replacement for my Duc, but I'm just not feeling the love. It may be the best, economical, etc do-it-all bike ever built, but it just doesn't move me like a Duc does.
 

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I think touring chops depend on the kind of touring too... so folks need to think about how they intend to use the bike. I found the Multi to be a near perfect touring bike... for the way I tour. I'll ride 15 hours a day for a week without touching a divided highway... but what I WILL do is spend a day of that week barreling down dirt roads. The FJR is too big, heavy, and lacks the suspension to be a touring solution for me... but when I DID spend a day on I90 knocking out 900 miles on the Multi I pretty quickly learned the shortcomings of the Multi on slab (wind control is crap, light weight is a downside on expressways)... I'd not own a Multi if I was a slab rider.
This is why I have a Multi. I don't yet have the time to tour as often as people like @DaveK but have done several multi-day, multi-thousand trips; the rest of time I'm on back roads or over the mountains where the sportier side of the Multi makes all the difference.

Mine has been playing up recently, hopefully resolved soon, but the only other bike I'd consider is probably the BMW S1000XR which I rode through Austria, Switzerland and Italy last summer, all the Alpine passes in a hurry. Ergonomically similar but the engine is completely different -- many here would argue boring or lacking in character -- but we pushed those bikes hard and never once a scary moment.
 

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I think touring chops depend on the kind of touring too... so folks need to think about how they intend to use the bike. I found the Multi to be a near perfect touring bike... for the way I tour. I'll ride 15 hours a day for a week without touching a divided highway... but what I WILL do is spend a day of that week barreling down dirt roads. The FJR is too big, heavy, and lacks the suspension to be a touring solution for me... but when I DID spend a day on I90 knocking out 900 miles on the Multi I pretty quickly learned the shortcomings of the Multi on slab (wind control is crap, light weight is a downside on expressways)... I'd not own a Multi if I was a slab rider.
Great points. When I was commuting 52 miles a day, I preferred my FJR to the MTS. Now that I work from home and my rides are more weekend rides in the 150 - 250 mile range, the MTS is perfect.

When we relocate up to the North Georgia area, I'll probably reconsider and find something a little smaller to be honest or pick up a dirt bike as a 2nd option.
 

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A story: several years ago, a buddy of mine was getting ready to test ride/buy his dream bike....a new BMW RT. After his test ride, he wasn't all that overjoyed w/the bike. t least not $15-20,000 overjoyed worth. I asked him if he wanted to test ride my '12 MTS. After an hour on the bike, he got off and said, 'why the f#@& would you buy a BMW when you buy THAT?' A month later he bought a MTS. I know, different strokes/different folks. With close to 100,000 miles on my '12, I'm seriously thinking about a new bike, but what can take the place of my beloved MTS? Only another one.....
 

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A story: several years ago, a buddy of mine was getting ready to test ride/buy his dream bike....a new BMW RT. After his test ride, he wasn't all that overjoyed w/the bike. t least not $15-20,000 overjoyed worth. I asked him if he wanted to test ride my '12 MTS. After an hour on the bike, he got off and said, 'why the f#@& would you buy a BMW when you buy THAT?' A month later he bought a MTS. I know, different strokes/different folks. With close to 100,000 miles on my '12, I'm seriously thinking about a new bike, but what can take the place of my beloved MTS? Only another one.....
100,000 miles? That is impressive and I am super jealous. I only managed to put about 8,000 on mine over the last year.
 
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