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Are you excited for the V4 Multistrada to be announced on Oct 15?

  • Yes

    Votes: 23 48.9%
  • No

    Votes: 19 40.4%
  • I coulda had a V8...

    Votes: 5 10.6%
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I want to see this comparison too!

I could care less how it compares to a GS or Vstrom or any other bike I have no interest in owning. I want to see it compared straight up for on-road handling with the S1000XR and the Superduke GT. I am guessing it comes up well short versus both.
 

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Discussion Starter #1,523
You are most likely correct in that it will not compare to the S1000XR or the SD GT on the road. I can understand the disappointment if that is what you are looking for the new generation Multi to be. From my perspective as a possible new adventure bike owner this seems to be EXACTLY what I've been looking for. I am a Harley Road Glide owner that has yet to find the bike that makes me feel good about going to something else. I have been researching adventure bikes for the better part of 3 years and have taken numerous test rides on almost every model. I've taken numerous MS rides and never really fell in love with it. I had at one point narrowed down my search to the R1250GS and the KTM Super ADV. Loved the overall ride of the GS but wanted the power of the Super ADV. When HD announced they were coming out with the Pan America I said that may be the one. Now then Ducati introduced the V4 Multi and as soon as I started seeing the videos and reading the reviews I have fallen in love with it. Now that may all change once I go ride it so we will see but right now it seems to be the perfect mix of on and off road and power that I've been wanting. But then I'm not a die hard MS rider that is in love with the current platform. In all honesty I would love to have the 2012 PP that I went and test rode a few weeks ago but only as my second bike. It is not what I want as my only bike. If the new V4 turns out to be what I think t is it will be the mistress that causes me to divorce my Harley Road Glide.
Thanks for sharing your thoughtful analysis on this. You seem to be the exact target market that Ducati is trying to win. Time (and unit sales) will tell us how well they did.
 

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You are most likely correct in that it will not compare to the S1000XR or the SD GT on the road. I can understand the disappointment if that is what you are looking for the new generation Multi to be. From my perspective as a possible new adventure bike owner this seems to be EXACTLY what I've been looking for. I am a Harley Road Glide owner that has yet to find the bike that makes me feel good about going to something else. I have been researching adventure bikes for the better part of 3 years and have taken numerous test rides on almost every model. I've taken numerous MS rides and never really fell in love with it. I had at one point narrowed down my search to the R1250GS and the KTM Super ADV. Loved the overall ride of the GS but wanted the power of the Super ADV. When HD announced they were coming out with the Pan America I said that may be the one. Now then Ducati introduced the V4 Multi and as soon as I started seeing the videos and reading the reviews I have fallen in love with it. Now that may all change once I go ride it so we will see but right now it seems to be the perfect mix of on and off road and power that I've been wanting. But then I'm not a die hard MS rider that is in love with the current platform. In all honesty I would love to have the 2012 PP that I went and test rode a few weeks ago but only as my second bike. It is not what I want as my only bike. If the new V4 turns out to be what I think t is it will be the mistress that causes me to divorce my Harley Road Glide.
I certainly don't begrudge Ducati building a bike that a lot of folks want to buy and by all accounts, they do seem to have delivered a well engineered answer to the GS. I just wish they didn't abandon another segment to do so.
You mention having two bikes and personally, that is one of the two main options before me now. Sometimes the answer is "and" instead of "or". ;)
 

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I certainly don't begrudge Ducati building a bike that a lot of folks want to buy and by all accounts, they do seem to have delivered a well engineered answer to the GS. I just wish they didn't abandon another segment to do so.
You mention having two bikes and personally, that is one of the two main options before me now. Sometimes the answer is "and" instead of "or". ;)
I don't disagree but unfortunately I can't justify having 2 $20k+ bikes. I'm either going to keep my current Road Glide and buy a much older less expensive ADV bike or if I fall in love with the new MS V4 I will sell the Harley and down the road buy an older one, maybe even a salvage title bike, to rebuild from the frame up the way I want. I know HD's inside and out and have a huge love for them. That doesn't stop me from admiring other brands and the style of riding they introduce either. I love being on 2 wheels and don't care what flavor of ice cream it is most of the time.

I just want to add... All in all this is a great forum and that's why I have stuck around and actually posted a bit on here. You will always have people get side tracked and take things personal on any form of social media. I appreciate all the feed back I have received with my other post and all my questions. People on here aren't afraid to tell you another brand of bike might be a better fit for your riding style or taste. The HD Road Glide forum is the same way but many other HD forums bash you for even bringing up another brand. But hey, we all love what we love. Lol!
 

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@potomacduc I want to see how it compares straight up with a 1260 S.
I think it will get stomped by the SD GT. The XR will likely cleanly beat it. The 1260 should too, but it might be a bit closer. In my very limited time with the 1260, it's a very nice bike, but it's longer wheelbase and general handling tend a bit more towards stability than agility versus the earlier 1200s. The 1260 feels a bit less sporting and more touring to me than the XR, but still gets down the road in a nice sporting manner. I personally was looking for them to move from the 1260 to an even more sporting approach with the V4.

In all the talk about the front wheel, the rear wheel gets less discussion. My guess is the relatively skinny rear wheel on the V4 will give the initial fool's gold impression of quicker handling. At a semi-sporty pace, skinny tires seem to give a feel of quick handling due to how quickly they start to tip in. After awhile (and as the pace picks up) you realize that just because a bike initiates falling into the corner easily doesn't actually mean it corners better. Small, short and lightweight sporty bikes with skinny tires can deliver on the promise of quicker handling with skinny tires, but larger, longer heavier bikes are a different story.
 

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Thanks for sharing your thoughtful analysis on this. You seem to be the exact target market that Ducati is trying to win. Time (and unit sales) will tell us how well they did.
Yes sir time will tell. I would also like to share that even on the HD forums they are getting bashed for bringing out the Pan America when the company seems to be struggling. Many say that HD should just stick to what they know and people bring up their other failures of styles of bikes like the Buell or Vrod. (Most of those comments were not from people that did any kind of research though and were strictly opinion.) All the companies seem to have the numbers and research that show the ADV sales spiking and are wanting a peice of that pie. Even Husky has introduced a fairly large ADV into the market and many other brands have made large improvements to ADV's they already make. Every one of the videos I researched on ADV bikes that compared the MS to another said that the Ducati just came up short in the off road category. Even with the MS Enduro there were many that just didn't feel it compared to the other major contenders especially with the maintenance schedule and cost. I just think Ducati decided to try and close that gap and they had to sacrifice the style of bike a bit that their MS loyalist love so much. It's a very common them with all brands when they make significant changes to a model that many already love. Brands try and move forward and some of their decisions they get right even if we don't always agree but they do get it wrong from time to time as well. It's all a gamble.
 

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Multistrada V4 vs Multistrada V2
Here's a detailed side by side comparison review in PDF from a guy that own a 1200 DVT.
I think there's something here for everybody.

Very well written with great photos and worth the read.

The spoiler comes as no surprises.
Looks goes to the V2​
Gadgets goes to the V4​
Handling goes to the V2​
Tourers will prefer the V4 engine: linear and predictable​
Sport riders will prefer the V2 engine: explosive and exhilarating​

Additional comments by the author.
Sound is disappointingly soulless vs the V2 and the SFV4 engine.​
Should have had two versions:​
A Regular V4 ( as it is now) but with shaft-drive​
A Sport "Pikes Peak" like V4 with SSSA, Ohlins and 17" wheels.​

The author didn't comment about weight. However, looking at the bikes together, there's an unmistakable size difference. On this note, he did mention that the V4 offers more legroom for his 6'1" stature.

Screenshot from 2021-01-12 10:24:51.png


He went on to conclude:
Would this V4 replace his V2?
As a touring guy, perhaps if he can get past the looks.​
Had there been a PP version, Yes, no question.​
Pros:
Easy to ride and efficient.
Motor is very linear, perfect for its designed use (but is it really better
than competition?).
Good ergonomics for comfort that's conducive for touring.
Top-Notch electronics as usual, not intrusive yet configurable.

Cons:
Aesthetics sacrificed for efficiency, it will take time to accept it or not.
The search for perfection has erased its previous character.
19 rims says farewell to sport tires.

 

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Sadly, my French is so rusty that I will have to resort to an on-line translation to get much out of the pdf, but from your summary, it sounds like his feelings are similar to my expectations. The V4 is a step forward if you want to go off road, a lateral step as a tourer and a step backwards for sport-touring.

The note on engine character is interesting. It's particularly interesting that it suffers in comparison to the Streetfighter, which many reviews say is already a somewhat sanitized engine versus the Panigale. It does seem that Ducati focused on lower maintenance and smoothness with the Multi version of the V4 and in doing so may have sanitized the engine even more. Like many aspects of the design brief for this bike, this approach completely misses the boat for me.

Thanks for sharing.
 

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Discussion Starter #1,530
Multistrada V4 vs Multistrada V2
Here's a detailed side by side comparison review in PDF from a guy that own a 1200 DVT.
I think there's something here for everybody.

Very well written with great photos and worth the read.

The spoiler comes as no surprises.
Looks goes to the V2​
Gadgets goes to the V4​
Handling goes to the V2​
Tourers will prefer the V4 engine: linear and predictable​
Sport riders will prefer the V2 engine: explosive and exhilarating​

Additional comments by the author.
Sound is disappointingly soulless vs the V2 and the SFV4 engine.​
Should have had two versions:​
A Regular V4 ( as it is now) but with shaft-drive​
A Sport "Pikes Peak" like V4 with SSSA, Ohlins and 17" wheels.​

The author didn't comment about weight. However, looking at the bikes together, there's an unmistakable size difference. On this note, he did mention that the V4 offers more legroom for his 6'1" stature.

View attachment 1000107

Would this V4 replace his V2?
As a touring guy, perhaps if he can get past the looks.​
Had there been a PP version, Yes, no question.​

For all of us non-Francophiles, I've translated this PDF review:
 

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Discussion Starter #1,531
Some highlights of Frenchies test ride:

The Details

The TFT screen is just beautiful, complete, readable. Navigation is intuitive I didn't have time to test the integrated GPS, it will be for a future. I like the finish less with the visible screws like on the 2010 model.

The screen can be adjusted with your fingertips on the ascent and descent, a nice evolution compared to the DVT. The case supports are unsightly protuberances compared to the aesthetic notches of the DVT. The choice is dictated to simplify the installation of the suitcases, and the rear hitch moves according to the pressures of the wind on the suitcases (priority to efficiency), all to improve stability at high speed (to be tested). It’s always better than the competition who often offers hideous busbars for suitcases, Storing the phone is very practical but a bit tight for my S10 + and its shell that rubs to fit inside.

In the saddle at a standstill
The saddle is much firmer (of course mine is broken in ...) and thinner. To be tested in long distance, I fear poorer seating comfort.

The position is perfect, all is well, we dominate the bike. The saddle in the high position is perfect for me (1.86m), my legs are less bent, in short, it feels great right away, an advantage over the V4.

In the standing position (off road) we are much better, straighter, free movement, good (even if off road use is extremely rare for me)

Agility
The bike is easy, no manual required, it turns on its own, both "agile and stable". Whether at low or high speed. Efficient, simple, never brutal, not open to criticism. In short EFFECTIVE, the 19 wheel does not penalize dynamism.

But you have to take the test to change motorcycles on the fly. As soon as my test was over I jumped on my Multistrada (I had warned my DS so it wouldn't race me ...). Incredible the difference, light, no inertia, my DVT throws itself in the curves.

Mine is very lively and incisive, much less intuitive to be sure, much more playful, but you have to tame it more (it's okay I know it by heart).

The Results
Ducati has made the choice of efficiency above all to reach a wider audience.
Well done for the service spacing, heavy riders will be happy.
It’s a motorcycle made to travel a long time in comfort, but without sacrificing dynamism.

But then, insofar as the sporting aspect is forgotten, why not go to the end of the process and put a gimbal altogether, that would be more logical and at least we would have kept a single-sided arm!
 

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Discussion Starter #1,532
Sadly, my French is so rusty that I will have to resort to an on-line translation to get much out of the pdf, but from your summary, it sounds like his feelings are similar to my expectations. The V4 is a step forward if you want to go off road, a lateral step as a tourer and a step backwards for sport-touring.

The note on engine character is interesting. It's particularly interesting that it suffers in comparison to the Streetfighter, which many reviews say is already a somewhat sanitized engine versus the Panigale. It does seem that Ducati focused on lower maintenance and smoothness with the Multi version of the V4 and in doing so may have sanitized the engine even more. Like many aspects of the design brief for this bike, this approach completely misses the boat for me.

Thanks for sharing.
His engine comments:

The sound
We start and there what a disappointment, no sound, no soul. Nothing to do with the engine presence of the Streetfighter V4 S that I had already tried.

A small variant when it starts running on two cylinders (when the bike is stationary for thermal comfort and consumption, the combustion process in the 2 rear cylinders is interrupted), but it remains bland.

To try with a complete line but still an additional cost and what about the homologation (to be digged)?

Engine

The test is only partial due to the running-in.
The shifter what happiness, as I miss it on mine!
As expected, the engine is very flexible at the bottom, little vibration, it pushes very hard, very early.
To appreciate it, you have to deactivate the DWC which castrates the thrust in low revs on the first reports.
Without the DWC it's just great, every turn of the handle when exiting a turn or roundabout makes the front lift, it's playful, pleasant, simpler and smoother than with the V2, I love it.

After this muscular push, well it still pushes, it does the job but it's linear.
Certainly effective, but linear. No hollow, no kick in the ass, in short efficient and effective. I did the test (on the highway of course), cruise control to 111 km / h in 6th gear then fully open:

• The V4 (3800 rpm of memory): reacts, accelerates continuously, in short efficient
• The V2 (4100 rpm): so a big kick, gains momentum then explodes above 6000 rpm (the banana what!) Another test, in 6th at 2,500 rpm:
• The V4 accepts, does not vibrate too much, takes turns quickly, but I expected better, I think from memory that the flat of the GS pushes harder in this exercise in a little extreme.
• The V2: bangs, groans, vibrates, insults you by telling you to downshift, but finally finds its rhythm (while the V4 is far ahead).

Overall, this V4 engine is very good, easier to use, forgives a bad curve ratio, delivers real feeling, usable over its entire range. Can't wait to retest a broken liver.

The V2 is rougher, less easy, but when you know it it really gives you adrenaline.
 

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For all of us non-Francophone, I've translated this PDF review:
Good idea thinking about translating the above PDF
Google translate is awesome but not perfect in the best of times. Compound that with a few spelling and grammar mistakes in the original text which has occurred here and Google algos default to a best alternative, literally.

Here's just a few corrections that were lost in translation:
The V2 (4100 rpm): provides a big kick, gains momentum then explodes above 6000 rpm ( ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶b̶a̶n̶a̶n̶a̶ ̶w̶h̶a̶t̶!̶) what a hard-on! (Google can't translate expressions)​
But then, insofar as the sporting aspect is forgotten, why not go to the end of the process and put in a ̶g̶i̶m̶b̶a̶l̶ shaft drive altogether, that would be more logical and at least we would have kept a single-sided swing arm!​
Can't wait to retest " ̶a̶ ̶b̶r̶o̶k̶e̶n̶ ̶l̶i̶v̶e̶r̶" :ROFLMAO: once it's broken-in.​
Had there been a Pikes Peak version available, 17" rims, Öhlins suspension (even if manual) and a single-sided swing arm then "I̶ ̶c̶r̶a̶c̶k̶e̶d̶" I would have capitulated and bought it immediately (or something along that line).​
 

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Great Thread - As a 2016 Sport Touring owner I have been curious. Back in 16 I rode the BMW XR before buying the MTS - VERY NICE, but reminded me of a sewing machine motor. That year also had bad vibrations which I guess they fixed. Thank You to the gentlemen that did the translation on the French PDF - that is exactly what I was looking for in 77 pages, I was a little bummed to see a bit of the lack of civility that you see on the gun owners threads here on Ducati MS, which is usually absent in this community.

Since my 16 has now devalued by about half I cannot see a need for the new bike. Although I am not sure which I would get the 1260 or the new V4 if both were a new purchases - I also ride a GS and I love it but it is a different experience from the MTS which I also love.

As to positioning this bike as more suitable for off road capable with the different wheels and higher clearance - I disagree.

warning - opinion:

I am a fairly good off road rider and as here in Colorado off-road means rocks and climbs I cannot comprehend why anyone would ride this bike or any other 20k 500lb plus bike off road or even in the Mojave Desert where I used to ride (think deep sand) - I used to take my tiger 800 and my current gs 1200 off road but it is not fun and if you are on the tough stuff you are biting down hard and going for it on the climbs and there is often a fall along the way which happens extremely fast - very expensive on the Ducati or GS. I would rather and do ride the WR 450 which is set up as an adventure bike,120 miles each way on the street and then the 40 miles over the rocky mountain pass then do the same ride on the GS and I would never ride my MTS over even easy passes like Buffalo Pass which only has about 5 miles of rock at the top with the rest hardpack sand and gravel.

As someone that loves riding the MTS on the road the little 280 lb WR is also surprisingly fun on the twisties as you can really throw it around.

It always cracks me up when you see "off road" reviews on these bikes and off road is flat hard pack sand trails and roads or gravel roads. Although I really appreciate when I want to ride 20 miles of a dirt road connector on the MTS which handles it fine as long as the gravel is not deep. But you could also ride a Harley or Cadillac over these roads.
 

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Discussion Starter #1,535
Great Thread - As a 2016 Sport Touring owner I have been curious. Back in 16 I rode the BMW XR before buying the MTS - VERY NICE, but reminded me of a sewing machine motor. That year also had bad vibrations which I guess they fixed. Thank You to the gentlemen that did the translation on the French PDF - that is exactly what I was looking for in 77 pages, I was a little bummed to see a bit of the lack of civility that you see on the gun owners threads here on Ducati MS, which is usually absent in this community.

Since my 16 has now devalued by about half I cannot see a need for the new bike. Although I am not sure which I would get the 1260 or the new V4 if both were a new purchases - I also ride a GS and I love it but it is a different experience from the MTS which I also love.

As to positioning this bike as more suitable for off road capable with the different wheels and higher clearance - I disagree.

warning - opinion:

I am a fairly good off road rider and as here in Colorado off-road means rocks and climbs I cannot comprehend why anyone would ride this bike or any other 20k 500lb plus bike off road or even in the Mojave Desert where I used to ride (think deep sand) - I used to take my tiger 800 and my current gs 1200 off road but it is not fun and if you are on the tough stuff you are biting down hard and going for it on the climbs and there is often a fall along the way which happens extremely fast - very expensive on the Ducati or GS. I would rather and do ride the WR 450 which is set up as an adventure bike,120 miles each way on the street and then the 40 miles over the rocky mountain pass then do the same ride on the GS and I would never ride my MTS over even easy passes like Buffalo Pass which only has about 5 miles of rock at the top with the rest hardpack sand and gravel.

As someone that loves riding the MTS on the road the little 280 lb WR is also surprisingly fun on the twisties as you can really throw it around.

It always cracks me up when you see "off road" reviews on these bikes and off road is flat hard pack sand trails and roads or gravel roads. Although I really appreciate when I want to ride 20 miles of a dirt road connector on the MTS which handles it fine as long as the gravel is not deep. But you could also ride a Harley or Cadillac over these roads.
Cool, thanks for sharing. And happy to have done my part of that translation to the rider review. Google Translate makes it quite easy.

I have a Multistrada V4 on order and look forward to riding here in Utah and making my way into Colorado and Wyoming as well. I don’t plan to do “off-road” other than the smooth fire roads which are quite plentiful around here. So as a former rider coming back into a new bike, I don’t have any comparative expectations for my new V4S to be anything other than a great bike for everywhere I plan to ride— short hops around town, fun rides up the mountain twisties, longer tours to scenic parks, and the occasional dirt road to explore a road less traveled.
 

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Interesting to see, that a person who doesn't trust opinions from most important motorcycle journalists all of the sudden trusts an unknown you tuber with 26 followers.
That is nice indeed.

In a Ducati Special magazine from Motorrad there are some interviews of the Ducati Engineers regarding this Multistrada V4. They started 4-5 years ago, drove multiple 100.000km's with mules. They never doubted the wheel (dimension) choices (simular to the 950 Multistrada), but had serious doubts regarding the engine choice (V4 over the V2). In the end they choose the V4 over the V2 because of the advantages know now (smaller size and better weight distribution within the frame). Their argument for the normal swingarm is a little odd, Ducati tells they cannot because of the spoked wheels, but BMW can do it (?). That is more a marketing thing. Real advantage of the normal swingarm against the single sided is probably weight / stability issue's.
 

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Interesting to see, that a person who doesn't trust opinions from most important motorcycle journalists all of the sudden trusts an unknown you tuber with 26 followers.
Your sarcasm is misplaced. This is the only side-by-side comparison that's been published.
It's just his opinion, that all. Hopefully we will see more of these from established Moto Journalists.
 

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Your sarcasm is misplaced. This is the only side-by-side comparison that's been published.
It's just his opinion, that all. Hopefully we will see more of these from established Moto Journalists.
Agreed^^^ I can get past someone's opinion as long as enough information is there. When I watch these videos I can decide for myself if their opinion on a particular feature is important to me or not even if their page has 2 likes or 20,000 likes. When it comes down to it there all opinions and most are useful until we get to see and ride the bike for ourselves and then that's when we decide what our opinions of the bike really are. This video above in particular we know going in he own and loves his PP that he has done plenty of mods to. So right there I take his opinions on the things he dislikes with a grain of salt. Now it does make him very knowledgeable on what previous features are and what to look for and compare. I thought he was trying to be fair and not biased but who's to say that if he were able to keep the V4 for a few days he might like some things better that he didn't like at first. For the V2 traditionalist this is a paradigm shift and some will like it over time and some will keep liking the older bikes.
 

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Your sarcasm is misplaced. This is the only side-by-side comparison that's been published.
It's just his opinion
You missed the sarcasm. Based on your earlier comments you made about real journalists, I was surprised that all of the sudden this guy was not "carreer saving", "bribed", "free lunch rider" with "questionable reliability". Oh, never mind, I'm too old for this.
;):cool:
 
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