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Are you excited for the V4 Multistrada to be announced on Oct 15?

  • Yes

    Votes: 21 55.3%
  • No

    Votes: 12 31.6%
  • I coulda had a V8...

    Votes: 5 13.2%
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Standard swingarm is more than cosmetic... it makes chain and rear end maintenance a lot more of a pita compared to sssa.

I think moving away from desmo makes sense tho - the redline on this bike is probably 11k or thereabouts - it's not needed.

I still think they've made changes to make this bike more offroad capable... and made other changes to make it more onroad capable - and they either directly conflict or don't add value. More like they're creating a bike that specs out to do both things well but they're really banking on riders not actually NEEDING it to do either well.
 

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Maybe for those buffalo roaming onto the fireroads in Yellowstone Park? ;)
lol... I was wondering how it will respond to trees on that gnarly single track I'm going to be ripping on it.
 

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Can you explain me why desmo valve train is important to you? I mean it was useful in the past when it allowed for higher revs without valve float, but spring technology make this useless now, just add weight and complexity to the cylinder heads.

I can see why a cosmetic change as a standard swing arm could be a deal breaker for some though.
It's important to me because I don't want a Suzuki, I want a Ducati. If the only thing separating a Ducati from any other bike is the badge stuck to the side, why would I bother paying the premium, dealing with the poor dealer network, lack of parts availability, or high labor costs? Especially when I know that despite moving to a much easier to service valve style, Ducati still won't release a service manual for the owners to do their own work.

I wouldn't want a Ferrari that had a turbo 4 cylinder in it either, for the same reason.
 

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I am following this closely because I am in market for a new bike. I'm close to pulling the trigger on the 2020 Multistrada 1260S Grand Tour (checks every box I want: sport touring bike, heated grips, center stand, cruise control, active suspension, etc.), but now I am wanting to wait for this V4 Multi to be announced on Nov 4 to see what more it offers vs the current model.

If it were you, would you buy now (current tech) and maybe get better pricing?
Or, wait until these new V4s ship and buy into the next-gen platform and tech, somewhat future-proofing this purchase to be made in the next few months)?

Seems like good choices either way...
That 1260S GT is looking pretty good.If the new Multi is a dual sided swingarm and 19” front wheel, well that doesn’t encourage me to move back from my 1250 GS. I’d rather go 1260S GT.
 

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Can you explain me why desmo valve train is important to you? I mean it was useful in the past when it allowed for higher revs without valve float, but spring technology make this useless now, just add weight and complexity to the cylinder heads.

I can see why a cosmetic change as a standard swing arm could be a deal breaker for some though.
The desmo valve train is what made a big twin spin. It's also what made a Ducati a Ducati which is being chipped away.
I suppose the desmo would not be needed in a four banger Multistrada but it's getting away from what made it different.
 

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It's important to me because I don't want a Suzuki, I want a Ducati. If the only thing separating a Ducati from any other bike is the badge stuck to the side, why would I bother paying the premium, dealing with the poor dealer network, lack of parts availability, or high labor costs? Especially when I know that despite moving to a much easier to service valve style, Ducati still won't release a service manual for the owners to do their own work.

I wouldn't want a Ferrari that had a turbo 4 cylinder in it either, for the same reason.
Flip side for me is that I only care about the final experience. If Ducati continues to deliver the sporting performance and riding feel they're known for, I couldn't care less how some internal component of an engine operates. I've never cranked open the throttle and marvelled over the specific feel of desmo valves. I have felt the pain of paying for the desmo service though. The desmo valve train is a 50s era solution to a problem solved more effectively by literally every other manufacturer on the planet. Keep the bikes exciting and I don't care about the how.
 

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Perhaps an electric Panigale is around the corner?
Traditional concepts are changing. Even trying to find a manual transmission sports car is challenging. Many exotics don't even offer it as an option.
 

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Discussion Starter #109
Full specs of the new engine:

V4 Granturismo main technical data
  • 1158 cc 4-cylinder 90° V engine
  • Bore x stroke 83 x 53,5 mm
  • Compression ratio 14:1
  • Maximum power 125 kW (170 hp) at 10,500 rpm
  • Maximum torque 125 Nm (12,7 Kgm) at 8,750 rpm
  • Euro 5 homologation
  • Distribution part chain, part gear - timing with dual overhead camshaft, 4 valves per cylinder
  • Counter-rotating crankshaft with crank pins offset at 70°
  • Wet multiplate anti-patter servo clutch
  • Semi-dry sump lubrication with three oil pumps: 1 delivery and 2 return
  • Fuelling with four oval throttle bodies (46 mm diameter equivalent)
  • 6-speed gearbox with Ducati Quick Shift (DQS) Up & Down System
  • 60,000 km maintenance valves check interval
  • Deactivating rear bank
 

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Discussion Starter #110
Flip side for me is that I only care about the final experience. If Ducati continues to deliver the sporting performance and riding feel they're known for, I couldn't care less how some internal component of an engine operates. I've never cranked open the throttle and marvelled over the specific feel of desmo valves. I have felt the pain of paying for the desmo service though. The desmo valve train is a 50s era solution to a problem solved more effectively by literally every other manufacturer on the planet. Keep the bikes exciting and I don't care about the how.
I’m with you. I don’t care as much about the sausage making so long as it tastes delicious. However this new engine works is less important to me than the overall experience and value it provides: fun performance, better fuel economy, lower maintenance costs, etc.
 

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I'm on my 6th multi: 2011, 2012, 2x2014's, 2018, and now 2019. Having lived for over a hundred thousand miles with no rear brake, + I'm not getting any younger, I'm done being a beta tester for anyone. While the new engine sounds like it's a winner, especially the dramatically longer service intervals, I'm in no rush to live with the teething problems of a new platform. My current '19 is the best multi yet, for me. In a few years, the V4 might be just the ticket, but I'm going to wait and just bang miles on what I currently love. Plus, I find it hard to believe that they will lose the single sided swing arm, but then again I can't believe that I can't get a service manual either.
 

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There are good arguments against buying the first year of production of any car, bike, or machine. I bought an early '98 ST2 that had electrical problems due to a poorly designed stator. I bought a first year ST4s that had an ECU that kept dropping its map I bought an early 2015 DVT 1200s that had a serious flat spot at 4k rpm. And I'll probably buy a first year Multi V4 because I can't help myself.
 

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I'm very impressed with the explanation of the new engine and, desmo or non-desmo, I find it hard to believe they'd be making a step backwards in terms of rider experience. If they make an engine that doesn't inspire as the previous one it will be a major flop on probably the most successful bike lineup they have, don't think that will happen.

I'm aligned with the @porkrind and @HoodooGuru , if it tastes good I don't care much about the type of ingredients used. At least from and engine perspective it seems it will be an improvement, better torque curve, less heat, more power, lower center of gravity....


I am following this closely because I am in market for a new bike. I'm close to pulling the trigger on the 2020 Multistrada 1260S Grand Tour (checks every box I want: sport touring bike, heated grips, center stand, cruise control, active suspension, etc.), but now I am wanting to wait for this V4 Multi to be announced on Nov 4 to see what more it offers vs the current model.

If it were you, would you buy now (current tech) and maybe get better pricing?
Or, wait until these new V4s ship and buy into the next-gen platform and tech, somewhat future-proofing this purchase to be made in the next few months)?

Seems like good choices either way...
Million dollar decision here.
  • 1260S GT: super-machine, proven platform with most issues already addressed, very fun and sporty
  • V4: next-level machine, untested platform that will likely be improved in the near future, apparently a wonderful engine but unknown definitions like the front wheel size and swingarm. Price will likely be higher than the 1260S
With the official launch in Nov and arrival of the V4's here in the US I see the following 2 possibilities regarding price:
1- V4 will be considered a hit and the remaining 1260's in stock will have better deal conditions
2- V4 will be considered a flop and there will be a race to buy the remaining 1260's in stock, prices will be probably full MRSP and not much negotiation margin

I don't think you'd be badly served with either option. In your shoes I'd likely have bought the 1260S already, and would be drooling on the V4 once it comes out.....
 

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BTW, BMW have unveiled their updated RT with active cruise today. Thought Ducati was going to unveil first?
 

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I’m with you. I don’t care as much about the sausage making so long as it tastes delicious. However this new engine works is less important to me than the overall experience and value it provides: fun performance, better fuel economy, lower maintenance costs, etc.
I guess the question is, what makes a Ducati, a Ducati? It has to be more than just the badge on the side, we've seen plenty of examples of badge engineering and where it leads. It's not because they're faster, they objectively are not. Rider feel? Ok, but that's an entirely subjective thing, some people think Honda feels the best, or some other brand.

I've always believed what makes a Ducati is the engine. The unique take on ICE design, the fact that they've stuck with it all these years, keeping it the equal of traditional sprung valves, at least in performance. That engine generates a raw, mechanical sound produced by no other motorcycle, no other engine design on earth. Other builders have used SSSA, and trellis frames, but Desmo is what made Ducati, Ducati. It was the hook, what made them a unique brand.

It seems to me based upon statements made by the CEO recently, they've decided to re-invent themselves as a company whose hook is superior electronics. I wish them the best with that, but competing on electronics while letting the rest of your product become just another beige commodity, is a race to the bottom.
 

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Discussion Starter #118
So I'm a bit confused, is the Granturismo a new and separate model, or is it a Multistrada Granturismo?
The new brand is
V4 Grandturismo.

So it is the brand name of the new engine. The new Multistrada models are yet to be launched, so those will like be branded as
Ducati Multistrada V4 Grandturismo

My guess is they will take a brand/product segmentation page from Triumph and announce multiple models, such as:

Ducati Multistrada V4 Grandturismo (base road model)
Ducati Multistrada V4 Grandturismo S (top spec road model)
Ducati Multistrada V4 Grandturismo Enduro (base off-road model)
Ducati Multistrada V4 Grandturismo Enduro S (top spec off-road model)

I say this as Ducati will have to find a way to bring to market and brand segment multiple models covering the various use cases & riders they currently serve with their existing lineup. I have a hard believing they will only launch one “jack of all trades” model to cover every use case.

See Apple with its now 4 model iPhone 12 launch as example #1...
 

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Not to be confused with the Granturismo 1200S that was offered before the DVT came out.

Grandturismo isn’t a thing.
 

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Not to be confused with the Granturismo 1200S that was offered before the DVT came out.

Grandturismo isn’t a thing.
Yeah that was kind of where the confusion came from. Still not really sold on this bike, I think they should have concentrated on making a proper sport tourer to compete with the R1250RT and FJR1300, only more sport oriented.
 
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