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Are you excited for the V4 Multistrada to be announced on Oct 15?

  • Yes

    Votes: 23 48.9%
  • No

    Votes: 19 40.4%
  • I coulda had a V8...

    Votes: 5 10.6%
2781 - 2800 of 2883 Posts

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I have heard BMW is going back to Brembo brakes for 2022. The Hayes brakes have been a fiasco they had so many opportunities to address that it makes me wonder if they ever really figured out the problem.

My 2018 R1200GS had spokes loosen on the rear wheel while in Europe in August/September/October of that same year. I tightened with a wrench twice but doing so while on a long trip is a get-by measure at best. By the time I got back with 6,000 miles on the bike a spoke was gone and I had half an inch of free play in the rear wheel. And by this time I started to hear a really loud hammering sound from the right cylinder head. Several dealers insisted it was normal and you could tell they just wanted me to go away. I insisted they at least pull the damned valve cover off the bike since it takes ten minutes to do on that boxer. Lo and behold the camshafts had begun to grind down. Short story long is that I had TWO major issues with a 25k bike in under 7,000 miles. BMW insists they fixed the camshaft issue by installing new and improved cams but do you think I'll ever trust the bike again?

I'd like a new MTV4S but my local dealer stopped carrying Ducati as they just couldn't move enough bikes. And the 2017 Monster 821 I bought blew oil out the 2nd time I rode it. They got it repaired in a few weeks and under warranty but that means my last two European bikes have BOTH had serious issues. It is one thing to buy a bike with a kick ass dealer near you (and my prior shop always did me right and didn't want to drop Ducati but it just did not make financial sense) but if I have to pick the bike up 300 miles form home and that is where I go for warranty work, it really makes me scratch my head. But I don't want another BMW either though the F900XR might make a nice lighter weight sporty-touring machine and the Triumph 900's vibrate too much. Gawd maybe I'll buy Versys 1000 or Tracer 9 GT????????? What happened to my reckless days of youth when I would just buy what I want and not worry about practical matters LOL?

NC
I originally was shopping the new V4 Multi and KTM SD GT as replacements for my 2013 Multi 1200. I haven't eliminated either of those from consideration, but I am leaning towards another option. I've already spilled a lot of pixels on features I am not crazy about on the V4 Multi, so I won't go there, but the pattern of reliability issues with new models is another part of what is pushing me in another direction and towards a two bike garage. My Multi has over 30k miles with no issues. That's not a ton of miles, but the bike will be 8 years old, so things will wear out. Therefore, I am looking at a new Tuono as a second bike. Even though it borrows heavily from the well-established model, the 2021 Tuono is a new bike, so may not be immune to issues in its first year or two of production.

The issue with bike problems is threefold; money, hassle and not having a bike to ride. I might not be able to avoid the money and hassle, but with a two bike garage maybe the risk of not having a bike to ride can be mitigated.

I am convincing myself that if I have one older Italian bike and one newer Italian bike, at least one of them should be running at all times...right? :unsure::oops:
 

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Owning two bikes is awesome. Nothing beats having two equally awesome, but distinctly different machines in the garage and getting to decide what kind of ride you want to have that day.

The only problem with this whole idea is that I'm not convinced the Multistrada, or ADV style bikes in general, are a great fit in a multi-bike garage. These bikes are supposed to be jacks of all trades, but in being a multi-bike owner, you are limiting the utility of that concept.
 

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2016 Multistrada PP
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That was Alta, and not even the best photo I could find. So many better photos (especially of skiing) of these Utah mountains that I plan to capture on my Multistrada V4S this summer:
View attachment 1005190
(The is actually Snowbird, next to Alta)
I did a Utah trip years ago and we hit Alta and Snowbird! Beautiful! Both amazing!
 

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2017 Ducati Multistrada 950, 2018 Desert Sled
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Two Ducati’s and a Honda sitting in the Garage, every single weekend I have a bike to ride 🎼
 

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Owning two bikes is awesome. Nothing beats having two equally awesome, but distinctly different machines in the garage and getting to decide what kind of ride you want to have that day.

The only problem with this whole idea is that I'm not convinced the Multistrada, or ADV style bikes in general, are a great fit in a multi-bike garage. These bikes are supposed to be jacks of all trades, but in being a multi-bike owner, you are limiting the utility of that concept.
I see where you're coming from, but don't agree with the conclusion.

I generally don't do the kind of riding that narrow category bikes are designed for, so don't really see having a garage full of them. I love the look and performance of sportbikes, but they get uncomfortable for me after 50 miles and I don't have a lot of use for short ride bikes. I sometimes dream of having every generation of Ducati sportbike, but the truth is I would have little use for them other than as collector items and eye candy.

I don't do long runs on the slab, don't ride two up and touring bikes feel fat and heavy everywhere else, so they are also of little to no use for me. Some cruisers are pretty, but I have yet to find a time when I would actually want to ride one. It's been years since I rode a dirt bike and where I live now would require a couple of hours of trailering a bike, so I don't see me getting back into semi-serious off-road riding or even true dual-purpose riding.

The type of riding I do falls into three buckets: Shorter semi-sporty rides of ~100 miles; single day sporting rides of 150-350 miles and multi day rides of railing through the twisties at ~330 miles per day. Basically, I want bikes that are good at those things. For me, that basically means road-oriented ADVs or sport standards/naked. I call it the "practical sportbike" spectrum. I just don't have much interest outside of that spectrum for the riding I do. Therefore, to get variety, I will need different powerplants with different feel and different looks. A Multistrada - Tuono combo seems to me to be perfect for that. The Multistrada with its increased comfort, panniers and better fuel range will handle all of the multi day rides. The rest will be split between the two. The feel of a big twin is very different from that of a V4 1100, so I will definitely get some variety there. The bikes have different aesthetics as well.

The potential fly in the ointment for me is going to be the comfort of the Tuono. It's been 4-5 years since I've ridden a Tuono V4 1100. I haven't gotten any younger since then. At that time, the Tuono was marginally comfortable enough for a single all day ride. The 2021 Tuono, especially the base model has supposedly revised ergos (tank shape, bars, rear subframe and seat). It also has a slightly higher ride height, so that may ease the use of lower pegs as well. If it all works, it is highly likely I will buy a Tuono. If the Tuono ends up being as bad as a sportbike and my knees are aching after 50 miles, then I will have to look at plan B. I do plan to ride the Multi V4 and SD GT (when the revised version comes out). They are potential plan Bs or if one of those blows me away, I would sell my current Multi, buy one of those and just have one bike. Two Multis would look too similar and just be weird. I've thought about a SD R as a second bike, but that would be two big twins and not enough variety that way.

One bonus with the Tuono is that keeping my Multi and buying a Tuono will actually be a little cheaper than selling my Multi and getting a well equipped V4 Multi. I'll have extra cash in my pocket and look at how pretty she is!
1005203
 

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I see where you're coming from, but don't agree with the conclusion.

I generally don't do the kind of riding that narrow category bikes are designed for, so don't really see having a garage full of them. I love the look and performance of sportbikes, but they get uncomfortable for me after 50 miles and I don't have a lot of use for short ride bikes. I sometimes dream of having every generation of Ducati sportbike, but the truth is I would have little use for them other than as collector items and eye candy.

I don't do long runs on the slab, don't ride two up and touring bikes feel fat and heavy everywhere else, so they are also of little to no use for me. Some cruisers are pretty, but I have yet to find a time when I would actually want to ride one. It's been years since I rode a dirt bike and where I live now would require a couple of hours of trailering a bike, so I don't see me getting back into semi-serious off-road riding or even true dual-purpose riding.

The type of riding I do falls into three buckets: Shorter semi-sporty rides of ~100 miles; single day sporting rides of 150-350 miles and multi day rides of railing through the twisties at ~330 miles per day. Basically, I want bikes that are good at those things. For me, that basically means road-oriented ADVs or sport standards/naked. I call it the "practical sportbike" spectrum. I just don't have much interest outside of that spectrum for the riding I do. Therefore, to get variety, I will need different powerplants with different feel and different looks. A Multistrada - Tuono combo seems to me to be perfect for that. The Multistrada with its increased comfort, panniers and better fuel range will handle all of the multi day rides. The rest will be split between the two. The feel of a big twin is very different from that of a V4 1100, so I will definitely get some variety there. The bikes have different aesthetics as well.

The potential fly in the ointment for me is going to be the comfort of the Tuono. It's been 4-5 years since I've ridden a Tuono V4 1100. I haven't gotten any younger since then. At that time, the Tuono was marginally comfortable enough for a single all day ride. The 2021 Tuono, especially the base model has supposedly revised ergos (tank shape, bars, rear subframe and seat). It also has a slightly higher ride height, so that may ease the use of lower pegs as well. If it all works, it is highly likely I will buy a Tuono. If the Tuono ends up being as bad a sportbike and my knees are aching after 50 miles, then I will have to look at plan B. I do plan to ride the Multi V4 and SD GT (when the revised version comes out). They are potential plan Bs or if one of those blows me away, I would sell my current Multi, but one of those and just have one bike. Two Multis would look too similar and just be weird. I've thought about a SD R as a second bike, but that would be two big twins and not enough variety that way.

One bonus with the Tuono is that keeping my Multi and buying a Tuono will actually be a little cheaper than selling my Multi and getting a well equipped V4 Multi. I'll have extra cash in my pocket and look at how pretty she is!
View attachment 1005203
We have similar use cases for bikes. I get it, in fact what you're saying is what I told myself when I bought my MT09. Less powerful, but it serves the same purpose for me the Tuono would serve for you.

There's just a ton of overlap in the sport-area between the two, and over the last season it's lead me to believe I might be better off with a true touring bike, vs. a hybrid like the MTS. Will I actually do it? Probably not, logic aside I'm not ready to do the Gold Wing thing yet, and I don't care for the ergos on the big Japanese ST bikes. So the MTS may yet be the best tool available, I'd just prefer to have more uniquely capable machines, if I'm going to own more than one.

The thing that changed between what I thought was going to happen and now, is the smaller naked bike taught me just how compromised the handling on the MTS is. It's big, and heavy, and slow on turns, and it feels all those things after riding the Yamaha. Not a fair comparison given that my MTS is stock and the MT09 is far from it, but there you go. Now, I don't want to take the MTS on those shorter ~100 mile rides anymore, because I know how much more engaging the other bike is. That leaves the Duc in a more pure touring duty, but anyway I'm sure you get my point.

Clearly, what I really need is yet another motorcycle.
 

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Owning two bikes is awesome. Nothing beats having two equally awesome, but distinctly different machines in the garage and getting to decide what kind of ride you want to have that day.

The only problem with this whole idea is that I'm not convinced the Multistrada, or ADV style bikes in general, are a great fit in a multi-bike garage. These bikes are supposed to be jacks of all trades, but in being a multi-bike owner, you are limiting the utility of that concept.
I agree with the two bikes concept - I was going to take the r1200GS out today for the first long ride since winter started and the battery was dead. So I got on the 16 MTS and had a great ride. When I got back I ordered the battery on Amazon and it should be here by next weekend.

I like the GS for times when there is going to be long stretches on dirt roads or if I am riding an 8 hour day as it is more comfortable to me than the MTS. The MTS gets the nod for spirited riding on mountain asphalt like today and my WR450 that I have set up for adventure riding for any single track or jeep trails.

I have often pondered if I had to pick one big bike would I keep the GS or the MTS. Tough call - Mary Ann or Ginger? The WR or something similar will always be in the garage.
 

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2021 Multistrada V4S
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95 Posts
I rode my V4S up to higher elevation (7,000 ft above sea level today). While I was up there I opened the left side pannier to get a bottle of water out that I had in the pannier bag. The pannier closed and latched fine but now that I am at almost sea level the pannier will not open. I can unlatch it but it is like the pannier is vacuumed sealed shut. I had issues opening the same pannier in the past as it always seemed to be difficult to open. Now I cannot get it open at all. Hopefully the dealer has a trick to remove the hinges or something to get it open. Luckily I have nothing in it that I need.
 

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2021 Multistrada V4S
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I rode my V4S up to higher elevation (7,000 ft above sea level today). While I was up there I opened the left side pannier to get a bottle of water out that I had in the pannier bag. The pannier closed and latched fine but now that I am at almost sea level the pannier will not open. I can unlatch it but it is like the pannier is vacuumed sealed shut. I had issues opening the same pannier in the past as it always seemed to get stuck. Now I cannot get it open at all. Hopefully the dealer has a trick to remove the hinges or something to get it open. Luckily I have nothing in it that I need.
Yep, it was vacuum sealed shut. I was able to put a small flathead screw driver in the bottom and open up the seal. When I did that I could hear all of the air rushing in and then it opened right up. Never had that happen before.
 

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Yep, it was vacuum sealed shut. I was able to put a small flathead screw driver in the bottom and open up the seal. When I did that I could hear all of the air rushing in and then it opened right up. Never had that happen before.
Well at least you know they're gonna be water-tight as well as air-tight.
 

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I see where you're coming from, but don't agree with the conclusion.

I generally don't do the kind of riding that narrow category bikes are designed for, so don't really see having a garage full of them. I love the look and performance of sportbikes, but they get uncomfortable for me after 50 miles and I don't have a lot of use for short ride bikes. I sometimes dream of having every generation of Ducati sportbike, but the truth is I would have little use for them other than as collector items and eye candy.

I don't do long runs on the slab, don't ride two up and touring bikes feel fat and heavy everywhere else, so they are also of little to no use for me. Some cruisers are pretty, but I have yet to find a time when I would actually want to ride one. It's been years since I rode a dirt bike and where I live now would require a couple of hours of trailering a bike, so I don't see me getting back into semi-serious off-road riding or even true dual-purpose riding.

The type of riding I do falls into three buckets: Shorter semi-sporty rides of ~100 miles; single day sporting rides of 150-350 miles and multi day rides of railing through the twisties at ~330 miles per day. Basically, I want bikes that are good at those things. For me, that basically means road-oriented ADVs or sport standards/naked. I call it the "practical sportbike" spectrum. I just don't have much interest outside of that spectrum for the riding I do. Therefore, to get variety, I will need different powerplants with different feel and different looks. A Multistrada - Tuono combo seems to me to be perfect for that. The Multistrada with its increased comfort, panniers and better fuel range will handle all of the multi day rides. The rest will be split between the two. The feel of a big twin is very different from that of a V4 1100, so I will definitely get some variety there. The bikes have different aesthetics as well.

The potential fly in the ointment for me is going to be the comfort of the Tuono. It's been 4-5 years since I've ridden a Tuono V4 1100. I haven't gotten any younger since then. At that time, the Tuono was marginally comfortable enough for a single all day ride. The 2021 Tuono, especially the base model has supposedly revised ergos (tank shape, bars, rear subframe and seat). It also has a slightly higher ride height, so that may ease the use of lower pegs as well. If it all works, it is highly likely I will buy a Tuono. If the Tuono ends up being as bad a sportbike and my knees are aching after 50 miles, then I will have to look at plan B. I do plan to ride the Multi V4 and SD GT (when the revised version comes out). They are potential plan Bs or if one of those blows me away, I would sell my current Multi, but one of those and just have one bike. Two Multis would look too similar and just be weird. I've thought about a SD R as a second bike, but that would be two big twins and not enough variety that way.

One bonus with the Tuono is that keeping my Multi and buying a Tuono will actually be a little cheaper than selling my Multi and getting a well equipped V4 Multi. I'll have extra cash in my pocket and look at how pretty she is!
View attachment 1005203
Well I made the mistake of going from two bikes to none. Lesson learned- always keep one until the next is in hand. I thought when I sold the second bike in December 2020, I would have the next one by now. Really have just recently had some decent riding days. So I was fine with April and that became June. So hopefully that is still the schedule for my V4S. The reason I went with an adventure bike is to get one bike that can satisfy multiple riding needs. The one bike is more a matter of time than anything else. If you have any other interest or hobbies that cuts into riding time. And of course there is work. So it is a matter of cramming everything into the hours after work or the weekends. The standard/naked bike was something I had looked at also.
 
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