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Genius!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
The seat base is finished, added the rivinuts to hold it on, and made a bracket so it only bolts on at the rear so it comes off easily. The last build is a pain to remove the seat. just need to add the foam and sand it to shape. I am happy with the mock-up but cant decide if the front mudguard needs to go central or biased to the front, but that can wait a while. the exhaust is all but finished apart from polishing and adding the hoops for the springs.



 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
many (many!) years ago I modified the frame on a Bultaco for a race seat. I put a complete back end on, much like what I have done here. I made very careful measurements using various fixings as datums, and welded it all up. soon as it was finished, and the seat on, it was evident that it didn’t sit straight on the bike. I was gutted as I had painted the frame. No one else noticed, but it bugged the hell out of me for years! I learned from this, these days, here is how I do it… I get the bike dead upright to a spirit level on the wheel, and then make sure the seat is level. seems to work!

I have also made a new purchase... an auto darkening welding mask... why the hell I didn't buy one years ago I just don't know! its so much easier!



 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
With the new seat the rear foot pegs were too far back, and uncomfortable for her legs, so important to get this right! I have made some new hangers out of 10 and 12mm steel tube. I made a jig first so all the angles and bolt holes were correct, and it wouldn't move as I brazed it. this is my first time TIG brazing and I was worried about strength, so I did a test piece first and tried to break the joint... the parent metal broke before the joint so all is well there!

 

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I have also made a new purchase... an auto darkening welding mask... why the hell I didn't buy one years ago I just don't know! its so much easier!
Hands down best investment I ever made in welding gear, apart from moving to TIG... The only issue I have is welding in tight / awkward positions where sometimes the sensors don't pick up the arc, or I move and the sensors get blocked & I get a flash, damned annoying & blinding!!!! Took me a couple or three flashes to work out wtf was going on:oops::LOL:
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
Hands down best investment I ever made in welding gear, apart from moving to TIG... The only issue I have is welding in tight / awkward positions where sometimes the sensors don't pick up the arc, or I move and the sensors get blocked & I get a flash, damned annoying & blinding!!!! Took me a couple or three flashes to work out wtf was going on:oops::LOL:

i agree! I actually think its improved my welding!

been taking a few days off and getting about a bit on the bike and in the car. I have to say Covid and the restrictions to normal life have got to me a bit!

I got my parts back from the water jet cutter, another superb job! while I was there he was cutting through a 150mm block of exotic alloy, its fantastic how it just cuts through such thick metal. I designed the number plate bracket, the headlight brackets, and the number plate backing on CAD and sent it to him… a few days later I picked this up. I could have cut it by hand but this is so easy. I was going to sell the number plate, but I have decided to keep it… L90 fits the engine configuration! below is a short video of him cutting the plates




 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
Strip down begins… the bike is now all in pieces and the frame and wheels are at the powder coaters. The engine is all in pieces as well ready to have the cases vapour blasted. Engine wise its all good apart from the exhaust valve guides which is a common problem on these engines… I need to replace the guides. Its easy to check if they are worn, here is a little video to show how to check them… the valve needs to “just” off its seat.

Here is a puller I made to remove the gearbox bearings. I know you can buy blind bearing pullers (I have a set) but for the gearbox bearings on the Ducati engine they don’t work well as there is no inner race to pull on, and you end up pulling the rollers out and breaking the plastic cage! They are also expensive bearings to replace at £60 each…. This puller expands fully into the rollers as the bolt rides up the internal taper. Also a primary gear puller I made a few years ago, along with the dimensions for that. I know you can buy them also (£150… where is the fun in that) but this cost me £20 for the laser cutter to knock me out 5 sets! Happy to share the CAD drawing…

checking for guide wear...











 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
Collected the frame and wheels from Redditch shotblasting… another superb job! its a 50 mile round trip for me, but well worth it for his quality work!

 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
My engine cases are back from the vapour blasters… another superb job from SP Vapour Blasting who are meticulous and I completely trust to do a good job! When I get them back, the first thing I do is clean them of any media that is left from the cleaning process. They were VERY clear of media, but I like to be sure! I then inspect all the threads. No point in building the engine up to find you have suspect threads, as at this stage its easy to rectify any that are poor. As it happens the only two that needed attention were the ones that hold the stand bracket on. This is a common failure point and I have seen a few cases cracked in this area due to lose bolts. I drilled the hole out and used a M10 x 1.5 helicoil. As these are a couple of really stressed bolts I use a double depth helicoil inserts (see picture for comparison) , just to make a good job of it.



 

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Too Funny, growing up my dad owned a hot rod shop and every engine and set of heads coming back from hot tank and machine shop went straight to me to fully wash out, and run brushes through all passageways, heat and paint/Glyptol….and he always made me chase threads in every single hole before we started the build….I still do it the same way 35+ years later. Great job as always sir.
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
Starting to assemble the heads. New exhaust guides fitted as the originals were badly worn. I heated the heads up to remove and replace the guides, and made a tool to knock them in up to the register. It’s long enough to go through a guide in which is a snug fit in the valve seat so I can ensure it all goes in perfectly straight. Also I have a tool to fit the valve stem oil seals… if you use a socket it damages the rubber on the seal. Two of the rockers had started to peel the hard surface off… I have replaced with good second hand ones. My Dad bought me that tin of grinding paste 50 years ago…. I can vividly remember him sitting in the chair in our back room with a BSA Gold Star cylinder head on his lap grinding the valves in for me…. My mother looking on with disapproval :mrgreen: it’s done well, only recently run out!








 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
when people say to me Ducati bikes are expensive to service I ask them if they have ever done the valve clearances! on this engine there are 8 clearances to set, on the 4V there are 16! at £12 a shim and with the time involved no wonder its expensive!

 

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
Build-up of the engine commences… The tool for holding the flywheel is essential. This one is home made, but they are cheap anyway. When people say wedge a penny in the gears I cringe!

One important thing to remember is there is one special bolt in the cases that acts as an oil feed to the LH case. This needs to go in a certain hole!

The bottle of oil is strategically placed... I am so ashamed of the welding on that engine frame!

I had a little help bead blasting the other day!





 

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What a cool thread...you remember your father with the beeza, the young ‘un doing the bead blasting = memories for a lifetime.
We aren’t too far away from the day when folks will frown on ICE engines, maybe just when that young lass is graduating college, and she will remember the day you came to see her on that amazing sounding bike she had a (small) hand in.
Thanks for sharing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #37 · (Edited)
What a cool thread...you remember your father with the beeza, the young ‘un doing the bead blasting = memories for a lifetime.
We aren’t too far away from the day when folks will frown on ICE engines, maybe just when that young lass is graduating college, and she will remember the day you came to see her on that amazing sounding bike she had a (small) hand in.
Thanks for sharing.
Thanks! One of my disappointments is I don't have anyone to pass my skills onto... My son is arty and shows no interest in engineering... all I know will probably die with me :( I guess...

one of my best mates ( top engineer!) was made redundant a few years ago at 64 when the company folded... he had planned to retire at 66 and thought he had no chance of a new job at his age... I helped him put a CV together and I posted it on job sites... within a week he had three interviews and three job offers! he went contracting to a big company on factory maintenance. After 6 months he was called to the boardroom for a meeting with HR and management... He thought he was for the chop :oops: His supervisor was there, along with the factory production manger and a lady from HR. The production manager said he had been looking at the figures for machinery down time on the section he worked on, and said downtime had decreased by 80% :giggle: He asked my mate if he would move to another section and do the same, which he agreed... Then the lady from HR took over... She said they wanted to employ 2 apprentices and asked him if he would help chose them and then train them over the next 2 years... Oh, and could they make him permanent, and give him a raise:ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO: he retired in January after spending two wonderful years passing his skills on.

back to my build...There is something satisfying about doing the hydraulics. I pulled everything apart and gave it all a good clean, bead blasted everything and put it all back together with a smear of rubber brake grease and brake fluid. I didn’t replace any of the rubbers on this build, all seems to be in nice condition, so they just got a quick wash in methylated spirits.

Last update for a few days... I will be 66 tomorrow... a Pensioner! Another milestone reached! My wife is treating me to a few days away and we have family things planned!




 

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Discussion Starter · #39 ·
Happy birthday Buzzer.
Enjoy every lap (of the sun) you complete in the great endurance race (of life).
thanks! I had a great few days!

I took a good look at the forks, and while the sliders were perfect, the anodizing on the legs was past its best. I popped them in the lathe and used some 240 paper to remove the anodising, then followed it up with some 800, and then a polish. they came up a treat! I did consider re-anodizing them but there is so much to polish anyway! I fitted a couple of new seals, and some new oil. all in all not a difficult job!

 

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Discussion Starter · #40 ·
Started the rebuild of the engine… a tip I picked up years ago is its sometimes best to pop the piston in the bore with a ring clamp from the top, and then push it down far enough so you can get the piston pin in from the side… this saves broken rings and that’s important when a set for one piston is over £200! Put some rag in the open crankcase before putting the circlip in though!

 
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