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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I purchased my MTS new in 2011; we have done ~ 45,000 kms.

The rear brake has never worked for more than a few weeks at a time.

You may wish to try this:

(1) Bleed brake as per Ducati instructions with the caliber on the top of the rear disc.

(2) This is tricky bit - install this special tool I invented.

(3) Leave tool in place overnight.

(4) Voila!! The brake works for months.

Pic of special tool:
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Front brake version

I do this every night before a track day.

It firms the front brake up wonderfully.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I learned this trick from an old bike racer about 50 years ago.

He (long decreased, RIP old friend) said the increase in pressure drives all the little tiny air bubbles up into the reservoir.

Try it overnight on a front brake and you will see what I am referring to.
 

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I recognize that tool! It's Ducati p/n 041.03.674a, I just ordered one through my dealer for $227.59+taxes, hopefully we'll see it from Italy in 4-6 weeks.... make sure you order the correct length for your year/model, additional charges will apply for 2012+ DVT models...
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I recognize that tool! It's Ducati p/n 041.03.674a, I just ordered one through my dealer for $227.59+taxes, hopefully we'll see it from Italy in 4-6 weeks.... make sure you order the correct length for your year/model, additional charges will apply for 2012+ DVT models...
:laugh: TRUE!
 
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If you've ever rebuilt a master cyl, the first seal moves to a point to seal off any chance of air getting into the res. I'm really not understanding the "science" on this technique. And with the rear circuit, the high point is the ABS pump banjo under the seat. Wouldn't air still move to this high point?
Pressurized or not, air is going to try and move up in the system.

I've added the ABS pump bleeder and refresh my fluids yearly. I can lock up the rear at will without performing the pressed pedal deal.
 

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My 2014 has always worked ok. Stock with cat. After 2.5 years and 13k miles I finally was compelled to bleed it before it failed. I do not have a ABS bleed valve nor speed bleeders installed. I followed the instructions on canyon chasers youtube video for fixing the MS brakes. I bought a Capri vacuum bleeder, some of the expensive fluid (SRF?) and flushed the shit out of the system. My 2014 may have linked brakes, there’s some differences of opinion there, but I didn’t do anything special there.

Prior, I was using the rear pedal weight method occasionally. But I used a slice of a bicycle inner tube on my front brake lever regularly. After this last bleed I did the band on the lever one more time and it’s never needed it again since. Rear brake still works. I can get ABS to kick in if I press hard. FWIW.
 

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I do this every night before a track day.

It firms the front brake up wonderfully.
Thanx for the tip!
Did the same with the front brake lever on my 1260 last night.

The lever now grabs a lot earlier on the lever. I actually adjusted the lever outwards the other day and now I have to adjust it back after doing this trick.

And, the front brake now feels less spongy.

Will do the same with the rear brake this night.


I have a theory why this works:
Normally I would guess air bubbles travel up the lines and stop at the master brake cylinder. Then, when you press the brake the fluid pushes the bubbles back down the lines.

With this trick the bubbles also travel up the lines. The big difference is that the brake cylinder now is in the depressed state and when you release the brake the bubbles goes into the valve and back into the reservoar.
 

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With this trick the bubbles also travel up the lines. The big difference is that the brake cylinder now is in the depressed state and when you release the brake the bubbles goes into the valve and back into the reservoar.
But in the rear, those air bubbles will accumulate at the high point, under the seat in the ABS pump. No? The res is no where near the high point for air to travel up to.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
But in the rear, those air bubbles will accumulate at the high point, under the seat in the ABS pump. No? The res is no where near the high point for air to travel up to.
Normally, I would agree with your logic.

All I can say is that this method works on my bikes, both front and rear.
 

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Not the same. Needs constant pressure IMO. Snip of bicycle inner tube makes a difference on mine. I leave it on the grip when not in use.
The vid shows enough pressure to lock up the front wheel so the bike can't be rolled away? I dunno.. :confused:
 

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The vid shows enough pressure to lock up the front wheel so the bike can't be rolled away? I dunno.. :confused:
Because.... when it's worked for me, I put the band on and the lever is maybe 2" from the bar for example. Wait overnight. When I get back to it in the AM, the lever is now touching the bar. Let it out and pull, voila, it's tight and hard again. I do it a second time for good measure but the second overnight and the lever does not hardly move any. So the band puts, and maintains pressure on the closed system. Bubbles work their way to the point of least pressure, which is much higher than atmospheric so should not sit at any high points. They work their way to the MC where the air can escape (don't know how before you ask :) ), and bobs your uncle. Brakes tight again. Has lasted a couple of months or more once done. So far on my last aggressive flush-the-shit-out-of-it vacuum bleed, I did it once afterward, lever hasn't changed since.

Anyway the difference is the band will apply pressure for a full stroke of the lever (or as far as it will go) where the static device pulls to one spot and quits. I feel the same way about using a cable tie. Maybe either are enough, dunno, band definitely is.
 

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Wow, you guys weren't kidding.. the rear brake on this bike SUCKS. I am at 1500 miles on my 1260S and just today I tried a rear brake only slowdown going up to a red light. I think all it does is activate the brake light, lol. Im gonna have to do some reading on here to figure out what to do. I don't know how to bleed ABS brakes
 

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I don't know how to bleed ABS brakes
ABS does not change the way you bleed the brakes. One of the issues we have is the fact that you should get the bleed nipple on the caliper to the high point, which requires removal and inversion. 2nd main issue is the ABS pump under the seat is the highest point in the system, so air is going to get "trapped" there (why some, me included, put a bleed banjo at that point).
And for a really good, proper bleed, it's good to do the inversion procedure, then ride the bike and activate the ABS by locking the rear, then repeat the bleed procedure.
Just for the record, a set of EBC HH pads really helps.
 

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There are lots of opinions on why the rear brake is so bad. The one I think makes the most sense is that the rear brake reservoir is too close to the engine. The heat from the engine breaks down the brake fluid and causes the rear brake to fade. I've noticed that it gets worse the longer and harder I ride. I bet if you checked the color of the fluid in your front and rear reservoirs, the rear would be a lot darker. There are some threads that discuss options for building a stand-off bracket and using heat shield material to protect it from the engine heat. I just purchased some of the heat shield from Merlin and plan to try it. I'll follow up with my results.
 

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There are lots of opinions on why the rear brake is so bad. The one I think makes the most sense is that the rear brake reservoir is too close to the engine. The heat from the engine breaks down the brake fluid and causes the rear brake to fade. I've noticed that it gets worse the longer and harder I ride. I bet if you checked the color of the fluid in your front and rear reservoirs, the rear would be a lot darker. There are some threads that discuss options for building a stand-off bracket and using heat shield material to protect it from the engine heat. I just purchased some of the heat shield from Merlin and plan to try it. I'll follow up with my results.
I work on moto's and see other makes/models with master cylinders mounted a finger width away from exhaust headers. These bikes don't have mushy rear brakes with coffee colored fluid. They do have brake lines that run straight to the top mount caliper, which has a bleed nipple at the top. No convoluted line run and an abs pump mounted high, or inverted caliper with the nipple at the bottom.






 

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