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Discussion Starter #21
I can't remember where I heard it, but isn't it wise to weld the back hinge? are you going to seal it to avoid that and preserve the paint job? Great thread by the way, I love write ups.
Well, from what I have read people typically braze it. I am in debate phase about what to do. I will seal it with the Caswell stuff regardless, but I hate to leave it unfixed with epoxy functioning as the only barrier. My welding options are a little limited at the moment as I sold my TIG, with the intention of replacing it with a MIG, which I have not done yet. Oh well, I will update with the fix when I have one.

In the meantime:

I borrowed a friends welder a couple weeks ago (which I could certianly borrow again, but I think I would rather buy one now) and modified the rear of the frame with a few nuts. Then took all of the parts to get powder coated.

I welded the nuts into the back of the frame so that I can add a mounting pad for a cargo box in the back:

More on that Later

Everything came back from the powder coaters looking great!





That last one there is of a 2002 ST4S rear rim that I modified to fit on the monster aluminum 17mm axle swingarm. More on that later as well

Next up setting the cam timing!
 

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Discussion Starter #22
Engine Timing

After perusing a lot of different sites/threads I decided to do the valve timing on my engine. I followed the general guidelines in these posts:
http://www.bikeboy.org/camtime2v.html
cam degreeing and cylinder squish
Cam timing - Ducati Up North


A lot of good reading there, especially Brad Black's site, which is honestly one of the greatest Ducati resources on the internet. The amount of bother he has put into cataloging the ongoing tuning is a rare thing for professional mechanics (understandably so!!) to do, and I for one really appreciate it.

Using the target of a 109-106 intake centerline (the exhaust is tied into that, and I did not want to mess with the overlap besides what the adjustment would do) I set about figuring out what my bike was set up stock to be. To do this I fashioned a piston stop to find true top-dead center from an old spark plug I gently "deconstructed", threaded, and put a really long screw through. You could also buy one, but I could not find one commercially available to fit the spark plug thread size on the bike. Plus, this was basically free! And who doesn't like free?




I also purchased a timing wheel from Jegs, which was one of the most reasonably priced ones I could find:
JEGS Precision Cam Degree Wheel | JEGS

And I fashioned a "rod" to sit on the top of the valve to determine lift from a piece of scrap that I had lying around that perfectly fit into my crappy harbor freight dial caliper:


And using the crankshaft turner I already owned and a couple of hoseclamps and O-rings:


I was off to the races....sort of.


I started by measuring what the timing was at 1mm lift, and discovered that both cylinders were pretty close with an opening of around 25, and a closing around 66. Which was giving me a centerline of around 111. This was off from what was listed for the 900ie on Brad's site (25, 75, 115, respectively), so I checked and double checked and could not figure out what was going on. I finally said F it, and set the opening to give me a centerline of 108 and left it alone hoping my engine would not blow up.
 

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In regards to the leaky gas tank hinge. I had two tanks on two separate monsters (a 2000 and 2001) and both developed leaks and I had both brazed and both developed leaks at the hinge again. A good dollop of JB weld spread around the hinge plate on each tank and neither have ever leaked again.
 

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Discussion Starter #25
In regards to the leaky gas tank hinge. I had two tanks on two separate monsters (a 2000 and 2001) and both developed leaks and I had both brazed and both developed leaks at the hinge again. A good dollop of JB weld spread around the hinge plate on each tank and neither have ever leaked again.
A good suggestion, thanks! I am unfortunately to anal retentive to do that. I would obsess about it leaking while I was driving it constantly. For the time being I have relegated the tank to the beat up yellow one, which seems to be a non-leaker. Once I find the welder I want I will go at the less denty one later.


Good advice, I'm having a tank restored for my m800. I might just preemptively put some steelstick around the hinge.

Eagerly awaiting your next update bohalranipol =D
To think someone is eagerly awaiting! I will post some more stuff ASAP!
 

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Discussion Starter #26 (Edited)
In the universe where ASAP is 8 months later.....

To prep the lump before being shoe-horned back into the frame I did a few "might as well" items:

Cleaned and re-greased the hell out of the swingarm bearings as they were in pretty good shape. I also replaced the outer seals:



I also removed and spec'd out the oil pump, which seemed good despite some "wear" marks that were not marks at all really:





Finally, I rebuilt the starter. Mainly this was because the lug had been broken off by the PO, but also I figured why not refresh the brushes while I was in there. I found a reasonable kit from here (http://www.ducati.ms/forums/57-supersport/85395-starter-repair-rebuild.html that worked really well.








Right now I am realizing that all I have is photos of the things being taken apart! Sorry! If anybody is using this as a guide, it is really straight forward to get back together. You just have to make sure the lines on the case and caps line up. bolt it back together with the new brushes and you are good to go.
 

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Discussion Starter #28 (Edited)
Good stuff here! :cool:

Thanks for sharing!
Thanks!


I put all of my powder coated bits on the engine, which I am loving. I decided to do different mattes of black: frame, swingarm; gloss, engine covers; satin. So I put the engine in the frame, or more accurately I put the frame on the engine. I love my little wood engine stand, it makes everything so much easier!



I then started to finalize my swingarm installation. But first a small aside: An aluminum swingarm is said to reduce the weight of the rear by several pounds, which is nice. They are supposedly more rigid, which makes sense, as the aluminum swingarm is thicker/braced via the grove set into the side. However, complete set ups on the open market are reasonably expensive so I was sitting on the fence about this one. Here is some info on weight:

http://www.ducati.ms/forums/42-monster/191689-aluminum-vs-steel-swingarm.html

I looked over fleabay and found a reasonably decent deal on a non-complete swingarm. And after a long debate about cost vs. benefit I decided it was not worth the cost. I bought it anyway. So for any other wanderers thinking about doing this, buy a complete swingarm! As an FYI, the axle end caps do not transfer over, and the caliper locating bolt is not built into the aluminum like it is on the steel.



I thankfully was able to source the alignment tab



and the endplate, but no adjustment slider….

 

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Discussion Starter #29
So I measured…..



and measured…..



and measured…..



and measured…..


measured again….



and yet again….



And you guessed it, measured some more….

 

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Discussion Starter #30
And machined that puppy to fit.



So I added my new heim joints



Cleaned, greased the needle bearings, and installed the rocker, and installed the swingarm. I think it looks pretty good!



With a new chain slider….I don’t know why but little details like this are really satisfying to me…..





Also I did weigh mine before installing. The one in the above cited post was from a newer monster so I was curious if it was near to the older monsters. I found it was around the same weight savings, 2 lbs.


Next up…..The rear rim.
 

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Discussion Starter #31 (Edited)
Annnnnnnd I am back.

I have a 996 that I have accumulated quite a number of parts for including a set of forks and a five-spoke front wheel that I really wanted to use on this build. Of course to add that front wheel to the Monster wheel I would also HAVE to change the rear wheel to a five spoke. I had seen this mod done on several other monsters, so I knew it was possible and after a lot of research I found these few posts:

https://www.ducati.ms/forums/42-monster/139823-monster-rear-axle-sizes-years.html

http://www.ducati851and888.com/showthread.php?279-Marchesini-5-spoke-wheels&

http://www.ducatimonster.org/forums/tech/105483-rear-axle-size-monster-2.html

https://www.ducati.ms/forums/57-supersport/427554-monster-s4-rear-wheel-carb-900-ss.html

https://www.ducati.ms/forums/57-supersport/50624-25mm-17mm-rear-wheel.html

Wheel weights - not the kind for balancing....Now adding Tire weights

https://www.ducati.ms/forums/57-supersport/154897-wheel-bearings.html

Monster Wheel Interchangeability


If you decide to read through all of those I would be surprised if you weren’t a little confused. As is true with every source of unregulated information, misinformation is rampant. There is truth in there, but you have to compare everything, find where things align, where things don’t, and find who has done what. It’s a real pain in the ass. So after all the reading I had done I figured I would try and find either a ss1000 rear wheel, which would have been a 17mm axle and hopefully a direct swap, or an ST4S and deal with the bearing issues. Of course ss1000 rims are like hens teeth, so I managed to find a good deal on a 2002 ST4s rear rim:



I took the wheel completely apart including the cushdrive, which was a royal pain in the ass, involving: heat, cursing, long grade 8 bolts, cursing, impact drivers, cursing, hammers, cursing, lots of different washers, cursing, etc.. If you really want to know how I did this, honeslty I would say just have the wheels painted, don’t bother with powder coating them it was not worth it. Especially considering that you almost invariably destroy the cush drives while you are removing them. So….Paint.

But powder coat the rims I did, and they came out pretty nice:



So then I measured everything up to see how to get it into my swing arm.

The important dimensions are of course the width of the hub in the wheel, and the spacing of both the brake rotor and the sprocket from centerline. As had been previously noted the difference between the Monster and the ST4 is around 5 mm centerline to rear rotor. So to get this to fit you have to machine the brake caliper bracket, which I did:



Next thing to consider is the bearings in the wheel. The ST4 Axle is larger then the 17mm monsters, thus you have to switch out the bearings in the wheel to accommodate this. There are several bearings on the market that could easily be swapped in and I found one that fit the outside diameter of the wheel and the OD of the axle:

An SKF 361203R



Now while this pretty much fits perfectly (besides some slight width issues), an important issue is the internal spacer. The stock monster spacer wont fit into the ST4 wheel as they are vastly different,and the ST4 spacer can not be used as the inside lip that contacts the bearing would be touching the bearing seal, not the race. Having this contact is extremely important as it lets you set the proper preload on the bearings. So I found an aluminum tube that had the proper ID for the new axle and bearings, and the same OD as the ST4s ID. I then machined off the necessary width to make the spacer the correct size for my new slightly wider bearings, and cooled the new spacer tube and pressed it into place:



 

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Discussion Starter #32
With the wheels out of the way, the next thing I wanted to tackle were some of the design elements of the stock monster. Several things have always bugged me about the machine and I really wanted to try and surmount them using some of the new fabrication capabilities I had access to.

First: I purchased a Penske shock used and had them rebuild it to my specs. I looked into doing it myself, but for the ~$150 Penske charged to perform the service, it just didn't make sense. I love these shocks. For the price/access to techs they just can not be beat.



The one thing I really dislike is the remote reservoir. Everyone seems to relegate the mounting of these to the frame somewhere, typically on the outside near the passenger pegs. This horrid installation is further uglied up by the typical use of zip ties (gasp!) or hose clamps (gasp gasp!!). Suffice it to say, I really wanted to go a different direction. So in searching I came across a mount that was from a m900S that put the ohlins remote reservoir attached to two mounting points below the rocker:



I was really happy about this, except for the fact that Ducati had really phoned it in and decided to also secure the reservoir with hose clamps. So I figured there has to be a better way to mount this thing in that location. So, armed with the knowledge that those two mystery tabs on my m900 dark frame were for this reservoir, I began to model something that would work a little bit better and maybe look a little bit better too. I came up with this:



After printing it in a high strength nylon, I think it came out pretty decent. Certainly, keeps it a little more "tucked away".



Mounted



 

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Discussion Starter #33 (Edited)
I have always had a distaste for the stock headlights position; It always seemed to high up to me. This was especially true when the new generation of monsters was released, where they lowered the headlight a considerable amount. This look seems a lot better to me but, I am a big fan of round headlights. With the lines of the monster the circular front just feels right to me. So, my next project was embarking on a way to lower the headlight. Simultaneously, I wanted to put an LED in order to make a little more light (arguable) with less power consumption (without question true).

SO I purchased a truck-lite headlamp from amazon:

Truck-lite 7" headlamp

Unfortuantely, this headlamp will not simply slip into the monster's stock headlamp bucket due to the lights smaller size. There are adapters out there that allow for this to happen, but when I recieved the light I thought "damn, this thing looks pretty cool all by itself". Thus I decided to just mount the thing as it was to the bike without a bucket to cover the rear. The first thing I did was come up with a design for the holder:




This design would allow for me to secure the headlight as it stood with a separate piece on the side to adjust the height to be below the current mounting location. I printed it out using a nylon filament, which came out pretty decent. I then used some metal threaded inserts into the mounting points so you could bolt and unbolt it easily:




And it seemed to secure the headlight pretty well.



So next I began mocking up its location:



I found a pretty good spot, so I wired it up using a stock connector:




And here is how it came out:

 

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That remote reservoir mount is outstanding and I'm totally gonna copy that DIY engine stand, nice work on this project!
 
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