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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I recently bought on eBay a knock-off of the Sato Racing rearsets, for my 2012 Monster 696 ABS. Everything is well made, fasteners - for once - are good quality, instructions are clear (they are identical to Sato's, just missing the logo), I'm happy with the purchase. One problem I'm having, though, is repositioning the rear master cylinder: specifically, the banjo fitting would need to be rotated relative to the brake line, otherwise the latter will be forced to bend a little (instead of going straight), and it won't be long enough. Not sure if this is a problem for the non-ABS version of the M696, but for the ABS version it seems to be. My questions:
1. does anybody have experience with these specific rearsets on an ABS M696?
2. does anybody know if the OEM banjo fitting could be rotated relative to the hose? There's a portion that is crimped on the brake line (part A on the image below), which appears to be separate from the actual banjo fitting (B), but it doesn't rotate freely... wondering if it just needs a bit of force, but of course I don't want to risk breaking a VERY expensive brake line ($224).
 

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I recently bought on eBay a knock-off of the Sato Racing rearsets, for my 2012 Monster 696 ABS. Everything is well made, fasteners - for once - are good quality, instructions are clear (they are identical to Sato's, just missing the logo), I'm happy with the purchase. One problem I'm having, though, is repositioning the rear master cylinder: specifically, the banjo fitting would need to be rotated relative to the brake line, otherwise the latter will be forced to bend a little (instead of going straight), and it won't be long enough. Not sure if this is a problem for the non-ABS version of the M696, but for the ABS version it seems to be. My questions:
1. does anybody have experience with these specific rearsets on an ABS M696?
2. does anybody know if the OEM banjo fitting could be rotated relative to the hose? There's a portion that is crimped on the brake line (part A on the image below), which appears to be separate from the actual banjo fitting (B), but it doesn't rotate freely... wondering if it just needs a bit of force, but of course I don't want to risk breaking a VERY expensive brake line ($224).


No rotation on OEM. Buy another longer line, best approach


Proud sugar daddy of my 620ie 2001, S2R800 2006 and dirty sexy foxy lady AKA 1100 2008 Hypermotard
 

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Discussion Starter #3
At the end, I found a way to install the rearsets using the stock brake line. What did the trick was to remove the stock plastic clamp / shield that keeps the rear brake lines (master cylinder to ABS unit, and ABS unit to caliper) in position, on the back of the engine block. To get to it, though, you need to remove the exhaust (which I was planning to do anyways for other reasons). Once the clamp/shield is removed, you can pull the stock line toward the rear of the bike (I bent it just a bit). Careful positioning of the banjo fitting on the master cylinder ensure the line doesn't rub against the swingarm.
Final result is pretty good, I like how these rearsets clean up the rear of the M696 and make it look more aggressive.
 

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So, are you adding these because you wanted more cornering clearance at the track? How limiting did you find the stock rearsets for lean angle?

They look nice for chinese stuff. How long did the switch over take you?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
So, are you adding these because you wanted more cornering clearance at the track? How limiting did you find the stock rearsets for lean angle?

They look nice for chinese stuff. How long did the switch over take you?
You might be disappointed by my answer, but I installed them purely and exclusively for looks. Bike is for the occasional commute to work, I don't even plan to do any canyon riding with it. I just could not stand those gigantic supports for the passenger pegs, bike looks so much cleaner with the new rearsets!
As for quality, it's far better than I expected and both levers provide smooth and precise movement. The one thing I'm not too fond of, is the brake pedal return spring, which is supposed to work on compression, mounted between the master cylinder and the push rod. It works, but it seems to get compressed way too much, so I need to find a way to back it up a bit, or to add a conventional spring (pull) between the pedal and the rearset main plate. For now, I removed it altogether, relying purely on the spring inside the master cylinder, and it works very well.
As for the switchover, I raised them just a bit and had no problems adapting, but of course pushing on a track might require a bit more time to get used to them.
 

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Hahah ok slightly disappointed but I do agree those huge chunks of OEM metal do look kinda fugly and I bet they are heavy as all hell too. You should weigh them.

My 696 is a street machine also but I might dabble on the track a bit with it. I suspect cornering clearance is a little limited on this bike. It feels really low as well as wide at the footpegs.
 

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Want to tell you this was super helpful as I too bought this same ebay set last month. Just tried to get at installing them this morning and was met with the obstacle of the brake cylinder.

How have they held up after a year of riding? Assuming you still have this bike!


Waving from Brooklyn,
 

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So, are you adding these because you wanted more cornering clearance at the track? How limiting did you find the stock rearsets for lean angle?

They look nice for chinese stuff. How long did the switch over take you?
Stock is very limiting. I was banging my feet continually, it was very unnerving. Got a set of Gecko rearsets, problem solved.
 

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Be careful using these Sato knock offs. I had them on my M696. The ball joint that attaches to the rear brake lever somehow managed to screw itself in tighter, causing the rear brake to lock up. I ended up having to use 2 nuts to keep it locked in place.
 
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