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Discussion Starter #1
These kind of questions pop up all the time, so I apologize in advance. I'm getting my first bike around May, and I'm looking at the Monster 1100. I was thinking about the 696 for a while, but after reading reviews, everything said it was a pure beginner bike and was slow compared to jap600's. Now I know a lot of people are gonna say, well, you are a beginner, and I'm well aware of that, but I've ridden dirtbikes for about 8 years, I'm 21 and I consider myself a very alert driver, and a good one at that. So when I'm looking in the area of japanese 600 speed, is the 1100 a good starter bike?
 

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In one word: YES.

In a few words: If it is your beginner bike, be ready for a lot of issues. Your insurance will be extravagantly high (not to mention the need that you have extremely good medical insurance). You will learn a lot and become a master of maintaining your delicate bike. You will need to be super-vigilant in learning the "Rules of the Road" because you will surely be unable to handle that bike in emergency situations (so, don't look for trouble, and get ready to get out of trouble as safely as possible).

The Monster 1100 can be a beginner bike, but I am more concerned about others on the road than you learning on the bike.

Perhaps you can use that bike in a track instead of public roads? The Monster would be an appropriate "beginner" bike for the race track, but it definitely is a lot of bike on the road.

Good luck. Keep us informed with your decision...
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the response, yeah I know how other people can be, but I think I'm mentally ready for that. I took the msf course two summers in a row, just for the hell of it, and so now I have my license already. I've ridden my buddy's Street Triple and did fine. I was nervous, but a good nervous, not too comfortable to out-do my limits.
 

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have you ridden dirt bikes on the street or just the dirt? dirt and the streets are completely different animals when it comes to riding on either.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
have you ridden dirt bikes on the street or just the dirt? dirt and the streets are completely different animals when it comes to riding on either.
Well, I've ridden my dirtbike on the street plenty of times, illegally of course, but I've ridden a few other bikes on the street for short periods of time. The danger of other cars and traffic situations is going to be the same with any bike I get, I'm more curious in the torque and handling of the 1100. Like I said, I've ridden my buddy's Triumph Street Triple, and I thought the power of that was great, not too much, and not too little. The numbers are fairly close to the 1100, and since I've been in love with Ducati's for the past couple years, I figured I'd go that direction. I love everything about the bike, and I've researched it plenty. Just want to know some rider's opinions on the bike in general, and how it would be. Not some magazine, they all say the same stuff.
 

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No, it would be a bad choice... I'm not trying to be mean, just being honest. Best think you can do is go take your local MSF class to start. I know touve ridden in the dirt, but the class is designed to help you save your life out on the street. Then grab a used "advanced beginner's" bike; something you won't be upset over when (not if, when) it gets laid down. Off the top of my head, then SV 650, ninja 650r, or FZ 600 are all decent bikes with plenty of power to start on. Put 5-10k miles on that bike, then if you still want the monster, go for it.

I have no doubt you could deal with the 1100s power, but traffic is a totally different situation. It's not a good bike for your first time on the road. Grab a used bike for 2000-4000$ that you can resale for about what you paid, go learn how to deal with the fact that 90% of the cages are out there to kill you, then when you feel ready, get the monster.

For reference, I started on a gz250, road it for 200 miles, them bought a 650r and road it for 8000 miles, and now I have my monster 1100 which has 2000 miles. At the point, the monster is great, but it's a handfull and can easily get me into trouble without even trying.

Granted, if your heart is really set on a monster, get an older one for now, I'd hate to see you buy a new 1100 only to drop it. I've seen lots of posts this summer of newbies starting on 1100s only to regret it. Food for thought
 

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No, it would be a bad choice... I'm not trying to be mean, just being honest. Best think you can do is go take your local MSF class to start. I know touve ridden in the dirt, but the class is designed to help you save your life out on the street. Then grab a used "advanced beginner's" bike; something you won't be upset over when (not if, when) it gets laid down. Off the top of my head, then SV 650, ninja 650r, or FZ 600 are all decent bikes with plenty of power to start on. Put 5-10k miles on that bike, then if you still want the monster, go for it.

I have no doubt you could deal with the 1100s power, but traffic is a totally different situation. It's not a good bike for your first time on the road. Grab a used bike for 2000-4000$ that you can resale for about what you paid, go learn how to deal with the fact that 90% of the cages are out there to kill you, then when you feel ready, get the monster.

For reference, I started on a gz250, road it for 200 miles, them bought a 650r and road it for 8000 miles, and now I have my monster 1100 which has 2000 miles. At the point, the monster is great, but it's a handfull and can easily get me into trouble without even trying.

Granted, if your heart is really set on a monster, get an older one for now, I'd hate to see you buy a new 1100 only to drop it. I've seen lots of posts this summer of newbies starting on 1100s only to regret it. Food for thought
You didn't read his post he said hes taken the MSF course twice!

My first bike was a 900 monster, I say go for it!! You will outgrow the 696's power way to fast.

Just don't be mad the first time you drop or wreck it because it will happen eventually. :D

Main thing to remember is that if your head isn't totally in the ride don't ride, both times i've wrecked it was because I was tired and not totally comited.
 

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Do it, I bought a 696 for my first, and wanted more power not too long after. The 1100 only goes as fast as you want it too, If you are buying a Ducati, you clearly aren't worried about the price, so don't buy something you don't want
 

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You didn't read his post he said hes taken the MSF course twice!
He mentioned it in his first response, not the original post, which is what I read... So technically "I didn't read his responses" :p

(I jest :D )

TheBobMan46, heres a question for you that no one has seem to ask yet...

"Have you gone on a demo ride yet?"

Pure and simple, if you haven't, then do it... If not, ask yourself why you haven't yet... If you are serious about buying one, the dealer should respond accordingly. if you are not serious, then you know its not the right bike.

Yes, I saw he said he wants to buy next may, but why does that have to stop from taking a demo ride now?? If you are really serious about wanting one, the only way "you" will really know is go ride one and find out. Key here is, be honest to yourself... If the bike feels like too much, don't expect to grow into it quickly. Its been said over and over; people can learn on any bike, but bigger bikes make it harder and slower to build your skills. A big bike isnt going to be forgiving, its going to bite back if you do something wrong. Thats what makes it fun, but thats what also makes it dangerous.

For me, the time I spent on the 650 was invaluable. It helped me understand the type of riding I really enjoy. It helped me hone my skills. No, it wasn't the bike I "wanted" but I went into that purchase with the plan to eventually upgrade. In the end, I traded the 650 in to the dealer for the 1100, got almost exactly what I paid for it (only lost $200 after 8 mths), and rode it for 8,000 miles.

I look at my 1100 now and think about some of the riding mistakes I made while building my defensive riding skills on the 650. If I made those now with the 1100, I most likely would have total my bike. Bigger bike = less room for error...
 

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seems a bit expensive for a bike you're likely going to drop and scratch up in a parking lot in a moment of stupidity. i'd say get a cheap old japanese bike for a year or so and learn those lessons on that. You can likely sell it for what you got it for, then buy something more pricey.
 

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Sounds like you have a decent respect for the bike. Treat her well and she'll return the favor. The single best thing you can do is invest in some good gear and take her to the track. With quality instruction, you can learn what she is truly capable of and designed for. You don't have to drag a knee or back her into a corner to learn how to handle a bike, just relax and take it slow. A closed course is hands down better than the best canyon ride or spirited cloverleaf on the interstate.
You might lay her down and scuff things up on the road or the track. If you do, keep in mind there is no better justification for upgrades!
Good luck
 

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Bored of the 696, me thinks not.

Buy an uncomfortable Superbike for the street then after you get bored of using to 1% of it's potential hop on something fun agile and comfortable like the g/f's 696.


I know my next bike to share the stable with the 999 will the "no fun little bike" :rolleyes:

Always need more power for the street...then you get it and it's like "this is what i went to all the trouble for?"
 

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The biggest thing you have to watch on a Ducati as a beginner is the responsiveness of the bike. My friend, who is an experienced rider, crashed my brand new 848 on a ride around the block. Something happened, he panicked a tiny bit, grabbed the front brake and down it went.

The motor is very torquey, the throttle is touchy, the brakes are strong and the chassis is very responsive to rider input. All those things together make the bike a bit tricky to ride if you don't have much experience.
 

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The biggest thing you have to watch on a Ducati as a beginner is the responsiveness of the bike. My friend, who is an experienced rider, crashed my brand new 848 on a ride around the block. Something happened, he panicked a tiny bit, grabbed the front brake and down it went.

The motor is very torquey, the throttle is touchy, the brakes are strong and the chassis is very responsive to rider input. All those things together make the bike a bit tricky to ride if you don't have much experience.
Yah you have to be easy on throttle and brakes at first. Its funny since a duc was my first bike anytime I ride someone elses bike their clutch (wet vs dry) and brakes feel so soft, especially on harleys!
 
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