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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi Everybody!

My MTS 1200S 17’ has some problem😕
I’ve done everything can make the sus (preload - skyhook) hard but nothing really helps....🤢 It’s too soft so i feel really unstable when i pass the corners. I normally use the sport mode and go to circuit every month. Even i set everything to focus on making preload hard, it’s still too soft so cannot make the clear line when i go over 140km at cornering. What can be the solution? If i do overhaul with front folk, should i try to put different amount of oil? Or should i change the spring which is harder than current one? Or change the wheel? Or other solutions can be recommended ? Pls help me...I don’t want to slip...I cannot sleep🥺🥺🥺
 

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Did you try stroking it gently? Wait... wrong thread...

You need something stiff in the rear I'd wager... damn did it again...

You. will. need. to. upgrade. the. shock. spring.

there... whew...
 

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How much do you weigh? Don't mean to be snarky, but the MTS isn't a superbike. It's awesome on the track but it's important to recognize that it isn't a track-bike.
 

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Notwithstanding the springs (a possibility), do bring your bike to a suspension specialist.
It may be more than just pre-load. He may re-valve your set-up, change the oil viscosity etc.
Don't lose sleep over it. There's a solution.
 

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I want to chime in and say you don't want it hard...your goal should be keeping the fork travel off the bottom...if it doesn't move...it will not grip when you need it...so if your slamming into the bottom..then yes to stiffer springs...if not, your only increasing the likely hood of loosing the front in a corner...adding more oil in the fork is for tuning that last inch of travel...does nothing for the stroke...and if you maxed out the preload trying to control it's motion...keep in mind that without motion there is no damping...any fork setting won't make any difference
 

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How many miles on the bike? Replace "bike" with shock and if it's 2-3 years and 30K+ miles a rebuild is in order, which will allow you to upgrade the spring at the same time. Before you disable the bike have the forks serviced. Mine were very tired at 18K. Big difference.


Although many owners have posted "Sachs isn't rebuildable" around the net, they are. Just make sure you or the tech you prefer get the shock out with the canister attached, which is expedited by unbolting the subframe and moving it out of the way. $300 for the rebuild off the bike and about $100 for a new spring should your geared up weight require it. Gererally over 200lbs benefits from uprated spring.
 

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I am a pretty tall at 191cm and about 115kgs.
I am an intermediate rider but go alright for an old bloke.

2017 Multi with skyhook.

I have changed the rear spring to a heavier spring and surprise surprise the front is so much better now.

In short I had about 65 mm rear sag with me on the bike and preload at 18
100mm of sag when two up preload at 24.
Now I run the rear preload at 2 with me and at 10 when two up 15 two up with gear. I am able to maintain about 35mm loaded rear sag .

Also the rear is utilising all of its travell now.

☆☆☆☆
Why the front is so much better.
The bike is sitting level, under brakes or decelerating the rear suspension doesn't unload (to much sag) causing a huge weight transfer to the front which then overwhelms the front fork.
☆☆☆☆

The bike carries the load easier and I am not chasing a stiffer setting through the dampening adjustment provided by the skyhook.

From memory I run the front preload 3 turns in.

The numbers are from memory I do have them written down.

This was all Racetech gear done in consultation with Terry Hay Shock Treatment in Australia.

I am really happy with the setup, if the rear is a little stiff I can always machine the provided spacer down to reduce the assembled preload.
I just haven't been riding enough to give it a good workout because of the bushfires.

I have to get around to doing a write up of what I did for the rest of us Multi owners who hate their rear spring.

In short

About 3 hours work you do need a spring compressor.

Link to my spring.


The springs are in 50lb increments.
Just change the last 3 digits in the search eg. 0700 to 0650 for a lighter spring.

I am not sure this is 100% correct The standard spring is a 106n/m spring were as the new spring is a 125n/m spring I will confirm.
I received the 106n/m info from the Australian Ducati importer.

I hope this helps and might start a conversation to help other people.


Pictures of parts


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I have the dimensions of the spacer and washer also if you would like to manufacture them yourself.
Spring rate conversion along the
bottom.

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How many miles on the bike? Replace "bike" with shock and if it's 2-3 years and 30K+ miles a rebuild is in order, which will allow you to upgrade the spring at the same time. Before you disable the bike have the forks serviced. Mine were very tired at 18K. Big difference.


Although many owners have posted "Sachs isn't rebuildable" around the net, they are. Just make sure you or the tech you prefer get the shock out with the canister attached, which is expedited by unbolting the subframe and moving it out of the way. $300 for the rebuild off the bike and about $100 for a new spring should your geared up weight require it. Gererally over 200lbs benefits from uprated spring.
My tech tested my Sach's at 60,000 miles and it didn't need a rebuild... but yes they are rebuildable. Sach's can do it for one... but for a tech to do it they need to modify the unit (Sachs must rebuild them in some sort of pressure chamber because there's no nipple on the damn thing)... my tech said that's not a huge deal but it does mean a bit more work the first time around.

The majority of folks who complain about the suspension on these bikes need one of two things - for it to be properly set up... OR for more spring rate in the back. This rider sounded like an experienced guy... so IMO the most likely issue is the shock spring rate.

Sadly... still no dual rate or progressive options for updating the Sachs for us bigger guys.
 

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Question for Super Su (original post): Have you attempted to adjust the damping (hard, harder, hardest). It's a common misconception that adjusting the preload will change the firmness/softness of the suspension. The preload adjustments (front and back) only affects the ride height/attitude. If you are having problems setting your sag, you may need a stiffer spring. I weigh 210 LBS with gear, and I'm pretty much at the weight limit of the stock springs (2015 S).

Good luck!
 

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One post and the OP disappears off the face of the earth.
I wished I had of taken my time to write a detailed post with my experience of improving the Skyhook for big blokes.

Oops I did do that.

Maybe he just got sucked into the black hole of suspension adjustment and will never be seen again.


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SACH SkyHook has progressive springs, first part of travel is soft then under load the spring gets firmer. Ive been having the similar trouble on my 790 trackday bike as it had variable rate spring front and back.. I got rid of the stock suspension and fitted a Nitron rear Shock and Matris fork kit, bike is amazing now with correct weight fixed rate springs. As for your bike, its Skyhook so spring rate may effect the mapping for the electronics in Skyhook, a slightly heavier spring fixed rate would make bike far better on the track, but may not match up with Skyhook electronic settings. (there is a manual setting on Skyhook??) Fork oil weight change up front may help, but you need to know the stock oil weight, and stick with the stock oil brand, (not all fork oil brands W are on the same matching grade chart) but try a heavier weight IE 7.5W to 10W, id stick with the recommended volume tho. I did a few track days on my 2010 Ohlins Multi, it was fun but the tires took a beating due to the long travel soft suspension. Its a multi purpose bike but track days are not their forte.
 
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