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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok, I've been on this forum long enough now to know a lot of answers to a lot of the issues around these bikes, but now that I've picked up a rare, and rather stunning Paul Smart to sit alongside my Biposto, I'd like to just check with the Forumista what are THE things that HAVE to be taken care of to make sure this bike will last as long as possible, and I do intend to ride it hard.
  • I guess I need a MOSFET Reg/Reg at some point before mine fails (Don'tcha just hate mods you never see and don't enhance perfromance).
  • Fuel line - how do I make sure mine doesn't pop off or crack?
  • Ethanol and expanding tanks - just don't use it. Period.
  • Valve Guides - now what is this about... What are "bad valve guides", and how do I know if I've got them? And what do I have to do?
  • Belts every 2 years regardless of mileage?

Please tell me what I'm missing, and I really mean essential mechanical fixes and upgrades, not performance mods, I'll get around to all those - eventually, and It already has 2-1 Termi and Race ECU, etc...

Ta
 

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Interesting thing about the belts, in reading LT's book, he says the fanaticism about belts every 2 years is something of a leftover from the 90s Duc's. Those you had to be diligent about changing at 2 years or 10k miles because they were not very tolerant. Around 2000, Ducati started making belts reinforced with something like kevlar but not called kevlar because Dupont owns the trademark on that. At that time, Ducati only slightly increased the millage tolerance and left the 2 year timeframe the same, because of how bad a belt failure can be (liability). However, he has a 4 year span for belts as the recommended time frame. YMMV, but something to consider.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Cheers Greggers.

Also wanted to ask about the clutch. I've not had an open clutch before, and I'm told to consider them a service item. How long should they last? (2 track days a year plus good weather riding most weekends and the occasional in-town commute).

While I'm on the subject, the lever is much heavier than my biposto - which has an aftermarket slave. Should I do this to the PS too? I have strong enough hands to not care (my '78 Zed Thou is like an exercise machine in comparison) but wonder if it's mechanically a good thing to do. The fluid always turn black fast too...
 

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Oberon slave. Snag a MOSFET RR on eBay then buy the Triumph converter cable, easy switch.
 

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If you keep the stock wheels, stay on top of polishing/treating the spokes to keep the rust off. Same for oil line fittings and other cadium like plating.

You can find out which engine numbers were given the sub par valve guides with a search on this forum.
 

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To check for bad guides, I heard that you can get a read from your exhaust fumes which would indicate a problem, but that's sort of a first tell rather than a sure bet.

The way mine were identified was during a valve adjustment service. Only the guide at the exhaust of my rear cylinder was getting soft, the others were fine, but since you're getting in there might as well do all of them.

Fairly simply, the collet was broken and the valve was loose in the guide.

Somewhere on the forum there's a post with a range of engine numbers that ducati published which supposedly were built with the cheaper guides. My engine number fell outside of the range (built later) and still I had an issue.

At the time, (this was 2009 if I recall) Ducati said it would honor warranty service on bad valve guides as long as the bike had less that 15K miles on it. Mine had 16K so they gave me some issues but I went to war and won. they fixed it. Coming out of that debacle DNA said they would no longer fix the issue. This is in the states though, so I'm not sure if you'd have the same speech here.

if your valve guides became an issue, and Ducati refused to fix the problem, I would say that this would be the perfect excuse to have MBP re-do your heads and do some serious engine work, since it's going to come apart.

Don't do 1/2 ass like me, I just put high-comp pistons which resulted in worse gas-mileage and added 3 of the most elusive HPs... (although new engine components are never bad since you're prolonging its life...)

I had bought MBP guides and collets (race engine quality), but ducati wouldn't install them since it was a warranty job, they had to go with the OEM, the bastards...

Anyway, let's go riding this weekend. Finally sunny!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
To check for bad guides, I heard that you can get a read from your exhaust fumes which would indicate a problem, but that's sort of a first tell rather than a sure bet.

The way mine were identified was during a valve adjustment service. Only the guide at the exhaust of my rear cylinder was getting soft, the others were fine, but since you're getting in there might as well do all of them.

Fairly simply, the collet was broken and the valve was loose in the guide.

Somewhere on the forum there's a post with a range of engine numbers that ducati published which supposedly were built with the cheaper guides. My engine number fell outside of the range (built later) and still I had an issue.

At the time, (this was 2009 if I recall) Ducati said it would honor warranty service on bad valve guides as long as the bike had less that 15K miles on it. Mine had 16K so they gave me some issues but I went to war and won. they fixed it. Coming out of that debacle DNA said they would no longer fix the issue. This is in the states though, so I'm not sure if you'd have the same speech here.

if your valve guides became an issue, and Ducati refused to fix the problem, I would say that this would be the perfect excuse to have MBP re-do your heads and do some serious engine work, since it's going to come apart.

Don't do 1/2 ass like me, I just put high-comp pistons which resulted in worse gas-mileage and added 3 of the most elusive HPs... (although new engine components are never bad since you're prolonging its life...)

I had bought MBP guides and collets (race engine quality), but ducati wouldn't install them since it was a warranty job, they had to go with the OEM, the bastards...

Anyway, let's go riding this weekend. Finally sunny!
Cheers guys - keep em coming. I'll search for those engine numbers.

And yes - we are definitely riding this weekend!, and if you have your bike, we're planning a meet this Thursday evening too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Just realised this thread was a good excuse to post some pics I took on my iPhone this morning:









Timeless perfection...
 

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no mirrors?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
They're in the post officer...

I will get some bar-end ones soon - I'm just not set on what type suits the bike best, but I'm not a big fan of the faired-in OEM ones. They look pretty ok for OEM, I just prefer bar-end mounted.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Can anyone point me to a MOSFET RegReg in the UK that will work on my Duc. Ta.

Or any other good model that won't catch fire... PlugNPlay preferred, or tell me more about this Triumph cable, Spyvito?
 

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Dutch. Bar ends are ok but you may want to consider these from deprettomoto. First, they are retro. Second, they are called "race estensible" and slide outward by loosening the knob and sliding the arm. Third, you don't end up with plates where your mounting holes are. Fourth, they are low profile. Finally, they are on clearance. Cost me a fortune to ship to USA but would be less for you.



Triumph has released an upgrade kit which comprises of an FH012 Model R/R, Adapter Cable & Bracket. But instead of buying complete kit from Triumph, you could just buy the adapter cables (Triumph calls it Link Lead) - T2500676 - that is only about $10 USD - ridiculously inexpensive for what it is!
 

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Can anyone point me to a MOSFET RegReg in the UK that will work on my Duc. Ta.

Or any other good model that won't catch fire... PlugNPlay preferred, or tell me more about this Triumph cable, Spyvito?

Not in the UK but the shipping cost is ok........
YAMAHA SHINDENGEN FH020AA REGULATOR W/CONNECTORS /REPLACES FH012AA | eBay
This is the newest Mosfet R/R from Shindengen, good staff.
I prefer to avoid connectors (and Plug'N'Play wiring kits) where possible, from "experience" it's the most prone to failure part.
If you can hold a soldering iron it won't take more than an hour to install it, it's fairly easy job.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sSo2AY6Nm5M&feature=player_embedded#!
 

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do a search. there was a post on the regulators with a link to the same mosfet but with all the connectors needed to install it. I'll show it to you on my bike this week. But you have to zip-tie it in place... ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Cheers guys, and love those DPM Mirros, Spyvito - although I may still go for bar end as I like the retro vibe. I had DPM mirrors on my Superduke and the build quality was superb. I assume those lovely levers are DPM too?

I think I've found a few options on R/R in the UK, but my tech has said that although MOSFET is great, all I really need is a better quality upgrade on the OEM from someone like Electrex, as these do not generally catch fire... ?
 

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mirrors

go for bar end. I got mine off ebay. add a couple of stainless button head csk bolts to the fairing and bobs yer uncle.

I'll send you screws if you need them (if i can find them as i bought a box when i needed
 

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do a search. there was a post on the regulators with a link to the same mosfet but with all the connectors needed to install it. I'll show it to you on my bike this week. But you have to zip-tie it in place... ;)
My experience with the mosfet was that the mounting hole placement was a bit narrower than the stock rectifier. However, because the casting is aluminum and there are no critical components affected, you can use a Dremel tool with a mill or a drill bit and lengthen the oval holes. Then you can mount in place (mine was relocated to under the seat tray) easily.

More secure and looks better.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Hmmm. Been offered a non MOSFET but high-quality replacement, plug'n'play R/R with the correct connectors, so no messing, and I might just go for that instead of ordering from the US, etc...

Any last-minute reasons why not?
 

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Dutch. Please get a Mosfet. I tried an Electrosport and it burned up also. Resulted in having to always carry a spare. They get hot and unless you have one mounted on the forks like a Hyper, where it can get air, failure is a high probability. Why worry, Mosfets work and are cheap.

R1 2008 Regulator/rectifier | eBay

The Triumph adapter cable is robust and will give you no problems. If you don't like the connector to connector thing, cut the plugs off and splice in your existing harness.
 
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