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Discussion Starter #1
It had been 3 years since my last track day. I had only been on my supermoto chasing down sport bikes. So this was like starting over for me. Got my bike prep for track and found I had a small leak in the fork seal. Decided to still go, but got sick the night before. Now most people would stop there, but I'm a cheap old bastard. So 4am and off to Thunderhill. First session I realize that somehow I have forgotten everything I learned from Keith Code. Only good thing I did was keep the rubber down.

 

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Not too shabby! After the 3rd lap you can see how you got your confidence back!

The track seems almost all fast corners!!

Was the go pro (with the mounting) bothering you in the straights??

Can't wait for another one that I have on Oct!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
^^^ My ktm was 58 hp, so passing a liter bike was a thrill. But hitting 140 has its own fun factor. Toss up for me. But I'd go SF just for the no excuse about top end.
 

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Looks like fun! I've never done a track day so forgive the questions. Was the first lap no passing? Obviously I know your still warming tires and yourself up. Just wondering as it didn't seem like anyone was passing. Is the little thing taped (?) to your clutch reservoir some kind of transponder? Just curious. Thanks for sharing the video!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
C group is asked not to pass first lap. But a&b anytime except first session. Each provider has differnt rules. The taped thing is my GoPro wireless link. The slow thing is me
 

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I havent tracked the SF, but seems like 140 would be a challenge on an unfaired bike. Even with a screen, my helmet got pretty jostled if I didnt keep tucked but if I tucked too tight into the tank I felt like I wasn't in position to control the bike. I guess it's a testament to the stability of the SF if chest buffeting transmitted to the handlebars doesnt upset the cart.
 

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Great video!
Takin my SF to the track in September for the first time (me and it) so excited.

Thanks for sharing.





Sent from my iPhone using MO Free
 

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I havent tracked the SF, but seems like 140 would be a challenge on an unfaired bike. Even with a screen, my helmet got pretty jostled if I didnt keep tucked but if I tucked too tight into the tank I felt like I wasn't in position to control the bike. I guess it's a testament to the stability of the SF if chest buffeting transmitted to the handlebars doesnt upset the cart.
I've tracked my SF several times and 145 on the back straight is pretty much the norm
but I have to literally lay on the tank to deal with the wind blast. I didn't find that position to be a problem.

It is humbling when a race prepped GSXR1000 blows past you at 170...
 

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...145 on the back straight is pretty much the norm...but I have to literally lay on the tank to deal with the wind blast. I didn't find that position to be a problem.
Someone else also said to lay down on the tank, or it may have been Flyn in an earlier post. It's really key. Before, I would tuck town, and depending on the weather that day, I was ready to slow back down by 125-135 (even less when I had higher bars.) Then I read to actually lay down on the tank, I actually do a little stomach crunch to try to press down on it, and I can say just gettting down one more inch makes all the diffefence. My first try at this and I hit 155 and this time I wasn't slowing down because of the wind blast. Lol.
 

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I havent tracked the SF, but seems like 140 would be a challenge on an unfaired bike. Even with a screen, my helmet got pretty jostled if I didnt keep tucked but if I tucked too tight into the tank I felt like I wasn't in position to control the bike. I guess it's a testament to the stability of the SF if chest buffeting transmitted to the handlebars doesnt upset the cart.
140 is easy as pie. I hit 145-150 in short order, before the "chute" at one of my local tracks. The trick is holding it down till you get 158-160ish. But honestly, 140 is childs play. Even for the streetfighter F1098(s). She doesn't wake up till you're north of 125.


Someone else also said to lay down on the tank, or it may have been Flyn in an earlier post. It's really key. Before, I would tuck town, and depending on the weather that day, I was ready to slow back down by 125-135 (even less when I had higher bars.) Then I read to actually lay down on the tank, I actually do a little stomach crunch to try to press down on it, and I can say just gettting down one more inch makes all the diffefence. My first try at this and I hit 155 and this time I wasn't slowing down because of the wind blast. Lol.
Probably me that said to lay on the tank. It's what I tell all F1098 riders to do. One big tip, get a suit with a speed hump on it. Makes life so.much.more.easier. Then you don't have to tuck-in so low until you get north of 155.
YeeeeeeeHAWWWWW!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! :eek:


Nothing like it in the whole wide world, to pass guys in full fairing bikes and you're only on a....naked F1098. guys always come over all the time to my pit and ask me what I did to my "Monster" in order to get it so fast. "I turbo'd it. Otherwise my Monster wouldn't and couldn't pass you guys in full faired bikes!!!!" :eek:
 

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**** is an animal out there !!! I'm headed back out shortly, but I'll be lucky to hit 140 - ( 135 ) its what I'm comfortable with.
 

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**** is an animal out there !!! I'm headed back out shortly, but I'll be lucky to hit 140 - ( 135 ) its what I'm comfortable with.
Cobra,
Just remember, stay low to the tank. In the far long straight stretches of road, get the back of your butt all the way back to the rubber seat-stop. Even in the turns, stay low and keep the head down. Don't sit straight up and down, or you'll feel unnaturally top heavy and slow steering. The handle bar'd bike needs close attention to good body form and steady smooth transitions moving around the bike.

With all bikes, the rule is, when moving around the bike, do so in a manner that doesn't allow the bike to know you're riding it. Keep the inputs smooth and don't be jerky.

Highly reccomend moving the pegs up as far as possible too. Or you'll either get your toe grinded down, or start to scrape pegs or break pegs off in dips in the corners.

Lastly, if you have DDA's, plug them in, and tape over your speedometer part of your bike. (Keep the RPM graphic visible tho) You should always be focused on the ride. Not the speedo. IF you're curious about how fast you got that day, plug the DDA into the computer at home, or the trackside, and analyze it later. But keep your eyes off the speedometer. Buddy of mine's top speed for years was 158. I taped over his speedo and told him to focus on the ride, and he's raised it up on his bike to 166. (Triumph 675)

Focus on the ride. Not the speed you're doing.

Have fun!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! :eek:
 

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Thanks **** ! This isn't my first rodeo! I'm just saying my comfort threshold is at that pace ... older eyes and such. I didn't buy a naked bike for top end speed.. I just love the way it feels 'turning' now that it is set up for me..

All your advice is sound!
 
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