Ducati.ms - The Ultimate Ducati Forum banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Stupid question, but do you guys lube the outside of the chain in addition to the inside (i.e. the rollers)? I've always just lubed the rollers on my previous bikes, but I noticed when I picked up my 848, new from the dealership, that the outside was thoroughly lubed as well. What's the advantage to lubing the outside?

Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
457 Posts
Are you sure it was lubricant? Most new chains come covered with a type of preservative on them that usually must be removed, but flings off within a few hundred miles if you leave it. It looks like really thick chain lube.

That being said, you can lube the sides if you just want to protect the chain surface from the elements, but I usually don't bother. I clean my chain pretty good and re-lubricate it between rides, so it's not really a problem for me. I also don't like the additional dirt stuck to it from lubing the sides. It just makes more of a mess.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Are you sure it was lubricant? Most new chains come covered with a type of preservative on them that usually must be removed, but flings off within a few hundred miles if you leave it. It looks like really thick chain lube.

That being said, you can lube the sides if you just want to protect the chain surface from the elements, but I usually don't bother. I clean my chain pretty good and re-lubricate it between rides, so it's not really a problem for me. I also don't like the additional dirt stuck to it from lubing the sides. It just makes more of a mess.
Well I'm not positive it was lube on the outside, but it definitely acquired a ton of gunk just like lube does. :)

I just want to make sure I'm not damaging anything by not putting lube on the outside.
 

·
comrade moderator
Joined
·
26,753 Posts
Lube on the inside cushions the impact of the sprocket teeth and the rollers, that's all you need. Lube on the outside won't hurt anything...may help the chain sliders.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,020 Posts
When I lube the inside run of my chain I hold a cloth under the chain to stop lube spraying onto my wheel/tyre. Then I wipe the sideplates with the cloth for two reasons. 1: to give a measure of corrosion protection. 2: I hate wasting stuff, so I feel the need to put the overspray to some use!

I use a dry lube (Wurth, which I believe isn't that widely available in the US, but you can find it if you look hard enough) which has virtually no fling, and gathers absolutely no road grit at all. If you don't like cleaning gunk off, I'd recommend finding a similar product.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Cool. Thanks guys.

I've been using motoline cleaner and lube. No good reason; they've just always worked well for me. Minimal fling off, but that's okay because I'm a clean freak and I wipe my bikes down after every ride. :p
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,395 Posts
Might they have been referring to the fact that O-ring chains are permanently lubricated on the inside. The rollers move around the pins so there is no real way to just oil the outside of the rollers. :think:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Might they have been referring to the fact that O-ring chains are permanently lubricated on the inside. The rollers move around the pins so there is no real way to just oil the outside of the rollers. :think:
Yeah it tends to spread around a bit, but it definitely doesn't look the same after 200-300 miles (versus directly applying it to the outside, which ends up looking much dirtier).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
how do you lube a chain
i brought in my 08 zx6r for the first service which cost me 150$ for just an oilchange and clean and lube for my chain. to expensive for me so im gonna do all oilchange and lubing of the chain now. i was wondering what you guys use to clean and lube your chains and any tips pointers would help alot since ive never lubed a chain before also do i have to take the chain of or what do i have to do exaclty???
_____________________________________________________________________
hydroxycut
Phone book
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Steps
1. Lubricate your bicycle in the garage or outdoors. The floor is likely to get a little dirty, so thoroughly cover the floor with newspaper. Don't do this on carpet or other floors that should be protected, unless you've lined the floor with plastic.
2. Turn the bike upside down. Place it in the middle of the newspaper-covered area.
3. Familiarize yourself with the parts that touch the chain:

* front chainwheels
* possibly a front derailleur (the part that changes gears in front)
* rear cogs
* possibly a rear derailleur with two more cogs.
4. Scrape off any mud and dirt from the cogs on the rear derailleur. This works best if you hold the blade of the screwdriver sideways against the outer portions of the cog and gently turn the cranks. Try to avoid allowing the scraped-off dried mud and dirt to land on the chain.
5. Prepare the rag. Dampen it. Provided that you are working in a well-ventilated area, you might like to add a degreasing cleaner, such as lighter fuel or a citrus degreaser. (See "Tips", however.)
6. Take the rag in your palm and wrap it around the chain. Hold on tightly. Turn the cranks a couple of times while holding the rag around the chain firmly. This works best if you hold the upper portion of the chain, the one that's closest to the saddle (seat). You will notice that the chain becomes much cleaner.
7. Lubricate the chain.

* Mark one link with a magic marker, sticker or a piece of tape, so that you know where you started.
* Starting with the marked link, apply one drop of chain lube to each link. It's best to apply a little drop to each gap where two links overlap. Don't use too much or it will be wasted because you'll wipe off the excess lube anyway!
8. Allow the lube to settle. When you've lubed all the links, turn the cranks again for half a minute or so to make sure that the lube settles properly into the inside of the link.
9. Remove any excess lube on the outside of the chain using the rag.
10. Clean up.


_________________________________________________________________
Houston virtual florist
growth hormone
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
313 Posts
I lube the links myself, first spraying one side and then the other. I spin it around a while to make sure the lube gets all around the o-rings and then wipe the excess off.

If you just lube the rollers and neglect the o-rings, they will dry out and leak. My problem is that water then leaks in and ruins the chain, although I also think the lube can fling out once those seals are leaky.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
how do you lube a chain
It's pretty easy. I just follow the directions on the motoline cans. :)

Get a rear stand. Makes it a lot easier.

Protect your tire from the cleaner/lube. I put a trash bag behind where I'll be spraying. Apply the cleaner while spinning the rear wheel by hand, scrub the chain with a nylon brush, and wipe off any remaining gunk with a towel. Apply the lube while spinning the rear wheel by hand, and let it sit for a few hours. That's it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
If you just lube the rollers and neglect the o-rings, they will dry out and leak. My problem is that water then leaks in and ruins the chain, although I also think the lube can fling out once those seals are leaky.
I don't "think" I've run into this problem. Might be because I don't ride if there's a good chance of rain. Rain scares me. :eek:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
475 Posts
WTF?

This is a motorcycle forum, yeah? :abduct:
I guess he thinks it's the Ducati Corse bicycle forum. Not a real good intro post so I hope he was joking.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
472 Posts
NAPA chain & gear lube.... lubed the top and bottom of the chain as well as gears (esp. after washing the bike)...
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top