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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I would like to lower the triple tree/front fork to allow the SFS to turn a bit quicker. I have already increased the ride height to its max, wonder what is the lowest height possible for the front but still have enough clearance between the front wheel and the radiator.

Has anyone done it? I am thinking to show 4 lines of the top part of ohlins fork. (Now it shows 2)







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I would like to lower the triple tree/front fork to allow the SFS to turn a bit quicker. I have already increased the ride height to its max, wonder what is the lowest height possible for the front but still have enough clearance between the front wheel and the radiator.

Has anyone done it? I am thinking to show 4 lines of the top part of ohlins fork. (Now it shows 2)

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You could always give it a try and let us know how you like it :wink2: Maybe do it in increments of one line, i.e. 3 lines, then 4 lines...
 

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I would like to lower the triple tree/front fork to allow the SFS to turn a bit quicker.
Tipping the bike on its nose by lowering the front and raising the rear ride height will only reduce steering effort. Unfortunately, this is done by reducing the front trail dimension that serves to provide automatic straight-line steering stability — so it's primarily a safety issue.

A better solution is to raise the bike's center-of-gravity (CG) to use the bike’s weight to assist in turning and reduce lean angle needed to make a turn.

Don't just take my word for it:

Ducati Corse, in a 1996 memorandum, recommended raising the front and rear 10 mm to increase “flickability" as in a chicane. Yes, I said RAISE, not lower. Raising the bike raises the CG and a higher CG makes the bike go to the tire edge quicker (per the Ducati race engineers).
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
Tipping the bike on its nose by lowering the front and raising the rear ride height will only reduce steering effort. Unfortunately, this is done by reducing the front trail dimension that serves to provide automatic straight-line steering stability — so it's primarily a safety issue.



A better solution is to raise the bike's center-of-gravity (CG) to use the bike’s weight to assist in turning and reduce lean angle needed to make a turn.



Don't just take my word for it:



Ducati Corse, in a 1996 memorandum, recommended raising the front and rear 10 mm to increase “flickability" as in a chicane. Yes, I said RAISE, not lower. Raising the bike raises the CG and a higher CG makes the bike go to the tire edge quicker (per the Ducati race engineers).


Reducing the trail to reduce the steering effort is in fact what I am trying to achieve at this point. We all know the SF1098 geometry is not designed for the race track in mind, but I am racing in a class that only allows non-race based production motorcycles, (i.e. no SBK 1098R, 1198, or RSV4 etc) and the SF qualifies. The bike that dominates that class now is the KTM SuperDuke 1290R. I am trying employ every tricks possible to improve my SF1098, brought new since it was launched in 2009. its has been a fun challenge in fact, otherwise, I would have probably sold the SF and focus on my other race based bikes (R1, NSF etc) at the track as I hardly ride on the street these days

The CG is of my SF is already much higher than before after playing with the ride height adjuster, and it certainly helps flicking the bike easier. I just want to know how low the triple tree can go before the clearance between radiator and the front wheel becomes a problem. I will try 4 lines in the up coming track days.

Very useful info, Strega, thank you



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I say try it. I slid my tubes up as far as I could safely go on my SS and to me it was a big improvement and stability was not adversely affected.
 

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Bon Vivant
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Because of the SF's increased rake we have a long ways to go before stability starts to become a problem on the Streetfighter. But if you start to get a wobble coming out of a corner drop it back down a line. I would suggest doing these adjustments at the track and raising the forks one line at a time with a few laps of testing in between. You'll know if you've gone too far. I would also put the front in a wheel chalk and ratchet it down as far as it will go to check clearance before hitting the track, you dont want the front to lock-up on braking because it hit the radiator.
 

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I just want to know how low the triple tree can go before the clearance between radiator and the front wheel becomes a problem.
I think the maximum change you can make is about 20 mm. You also have the option to increase the fork leg fluid volume which gives a stiffer air spring at the extreme compression travel point.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I think the maximum change you can make is about 20 mm. You also have the option to increase the fork leg fluid volume which gives a stiffer air spring at the extreme compression travel point.




Tried 4 lines at the track yesterday, it certainly helps turning the bike quicker. I may stiffen the front fork a bit more and go with 5 lines as I see there are still some clearance I could use :)



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If you look at most superbikes the fronts are way down

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Do steet fighters have the adjustable steering angle too? Typically you should change the triples if you do that, I'm running 27mm triples on my 916, i thing the 1098s run 30mm


No it doesn’t That’s why I have been playing with other options such as lowering the triple, raising the ride height etc to get the way I wanted


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Bon Vivant
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IMO the SF is a great bike for occasional track days, I've done several myself, but as a dedicated track bike I'd probably opt for the SBK. I know it will take some adjusting to get the superbike where you like it too but I think its at a better starting point for pure track use...


I know there are a few of you guys who are doing all the work to make the SFS work on the track and I think that's pretty cool too. :yeah: But it seems to me to be a tougher road to travel.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 · (Edited)
IMO the SF is a great bike for occasional track days, I've done several myself, but as a dedicated track bike I'd probably opt for the SBK. I know it will take some adjusting to get the superbike where you like it too but I think its at a better starting point for pure track use...


I know there are a few of you guys who are doing all the work to make the SFS work on the track and I think that's pretty cool too. :yeah: But it seems to me to be a tougher road to travel.


I only did this because of the regulations of the race class that I am in, and for a bit of non-race based bike project challenge (and laughs) with my friends (example here, ZRX1200), and we kinda over did our bikes too... but great fun










In fact, I am racing in two classes in every same race weekends this year. The other class i use is a Honda NSF250R (moto3), which is a proper, no compromise track weapon, also much more demanding than the SF in every way. And yes, for pure track fun, SBK based is more logical. SF, especially the 1098 version, is a pain to get right indeed. Now I am starting to plan my next year’s track bike










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I lowered my bike's front end by six lines and raised the rear. It made a noticeable difference on how much efforts it takes to turn the bike into the corner. Aside from it I have also removed an inch of foam from Ducati Performance "racing" seat making the seating position lower. With a seat like that I almost always squees my balls against the tank at hard braking yet the riding became so much more fun. Try it, you might like it too! >:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I lowered my bike's front end by six lines and raised the rear. It made a noticeable difference on how much efforts it takes to turn the bike into the corner. Aside from it I have also removed an inch of foam from Ducati Performance "racing" seat making the seating position lower. With a seat like that I almost always squees my balls against the tank at hard braking yet the riding became so much more fun. Try it, you might like it too! >:)


Thanks for your info. I recall your SF has a different radiator, wonder how the position and clearance are different from the stock ones. I was a bit worried about the front fender touching the stock radiator.

I now have a new raised clip on mount allowing my elbows to be better placed on the tank. My seat, well, shall I say sheet (5mm) is adjustable now. Ride height is at max, and seat height won’t affect bike’s overall rake angle :)






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