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Discussion Starter #1
It was a fine, cool, cloudy Saturday afternoon with a chance of rain, so what do I do? Let’s install a chain oiler! Since the Ducati is the first chain-driven bike that I actually drive a lot, I’ve been looking for a good solution for keeping the chain well-lubricated with a minimum of effort—especially considering that the bike is not equipped with a centerstand.


Here is a quick pictorial tour of how I installed the Loobman onto the Ducati. Captions are below the picture that they describe.





The Ducati, looking fine. Note the small oil bottle attached to the frame below the fuel tank.





A closer view of the oil bottle and the clear oil line heading toward the rear sprocket.





The oil bottle bracket is connected by three zip-ties to the frame rail. The bottle, though held securely by the bracket, is easily removed for easy filling.





I routed the oil line down and back along the hydraulic clutch line. I can’t have any uphill in the line because the oil flows by gravity only.





Here the line makes the jump from the countershaft sprocket guard to the swingarm. I’m hoping that the plastic cap on the pivot there will help prevent the line from being rubbed through. If it does, well, that gives me the opportunity to improve on the system!





The oil line is zip-tied along the bottom of the swingarm, which slopes down slightly (but enough).





The applicator is attached to a wire that is zip-tied to the swingarm. It is easily adjustable for position and angle if needed. Note that the applicator arms are actually made out of zip-ties—they will wear down over time and can be easily replaced when they are worn out.





These pictures were taken after a quick fifteen-minute ride, during which I used the oiler several times to verify its operation (normally, just once every hundred miles should be more than sufficient).


 

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Hi Ian. Good pics thanks. How adjustable is the Loobman system?
I gather it's a manual application system rather than oil feed being triggered by the bike, so I wondered how the oil supply can be regulated to reduce oil-fling onto the wheel/tyres/swinging arm etc?
 

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Thanks for the info.
Unfortunatly, I don't like it. Cleaning the spoked wheels is a bitch of a job. From the pics it appears that there is alot of oil fling happening.

I am more than happy using the Maxima chain wax, which has virtually nil fling happening.

It was interesting to read the time comparison, on the time spent putting lube on the chain (in ther Loobman link above).
After 18,000 miles, 7hrs 30 mins spent lubing a chain manually.
After 27,000 miles, 27 minutes was spent lubing the chain.
How much time was spent cleaning the wheel and bike before and after?

Having said that, each to their own. If your happy with it....then keep doing it. ;)
 

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I will have to second that.

Very good products are made for O-ring chains these days. The oil lubing system might have been a good idea in the 50s, but thechnology have evolved quite a bit in chain design and lubricants choices.

Thanks for the info.
Unfortunatly, I don't like it. Cleaning the spoked wheels is a bitch of a job. From the pics it appears that there is alot of oil fling happening.

I am more than happy using the Maxima chain wax, which has virtually nil fling happening.

It was interesting to read the time comparison, on the time spent putting lube on the chain (in ther Loobman link above).
After 18,000 miles, 7hrs 30 mins spent lubing a chain manually.
After 27,000 miles, 27 minutes was spent lubing the chain.
How much time was spent cleaning the wheel and bike before and after?

Having said that, each to their own. If your happy with it....then keep doing it. ;)
 

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Personally, I would be more worried about getting oil spray on the downside of the rubber...

I agree with DucBeak, the O-rings these days simply do not require what was needed in the good old days. A quick bit here and there to keep things humming in my book.

Take care,
 

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Discussion Starter #7
The amount of oil is directly controlled by how much you squeeze. The speed at which the oil is applied is directly related to the viscosity of the oil. I have regular 5W40 motor oil in there now because that's what I had around. I've read that good gear oil or ATF also works well and I'm also tempted to try plain WD-40 in the reservoir.

I realize that there's lots of oil fling everywhere in the photos. I definitely applied way too much oil the first time. I'm hoping to replace the spokers with a set lighter tubeless wheels from an ST or Monster at some point in the future.

Also, the bottle is quite secure in its holder, also held in at the bottom by an indentation in the bottle.

And, finally, it's not about the looks. :rolleyes: If it were, I wouldn't ride it at all—you should see it today after a good Sunday afternoon ride that included a lot of dusty gravel and dirt roads.
 
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