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I just bought my 2000 750 SS and I’m planning on doing some road trips with it this summer. I was wondering if I could get some feedback on what to watch out for or do before hitting the road. Are SS known for anything good or bad in this area? Thanks
 

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My experience is with a '97 900 SS/SP. I bought the bike new and rode it for 30K mi. over 3 years. (This was far better than the first 30K on my '82 BMW R100S). One of my many camping trips was from CT to CO. I once had a speedo cable break. That's it. IMHO, the SS is an extremely reiliable bike, albeit requiring maintenance more frequently than some bikes. Things to watch would include changing timing belts every 10K mi. and checking valves at stated intervals. Other than that, have no fear. Just ride it wherever.

Bruce19
Mansfield Center, CT

'02 998
'05 Triumph Sprint RS
 

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I think they are pretty reliable overall. I have the same model and year, and have put 25,000 miles on it. One thing I would suggest taking with you in your tool kit is a hose clamp and knife. I was on a trip in the mountains once and the pressurized fuel line sprung a leak and was pissing gas all over my right boot and the hot engine (!!!!). The fuel line had got a pinhole right where it went over the barb on the bottom of the tank, from the sharp edge of the barb rubbing through it. Easy fix, even on the road. It happened within 1 mile of a WalMart, so I could buy what I needed.

Other than that, I have never even been close to stranded by that bike. It is like an anvil. Well, except the time I lowsided it on black ice and busted it all to crap. Actually, now that I think of it, why not take an extra set of levers? If I had had an extra clutch lever with me on that trip, and a few allen keys and simple tools, I could have ridden it home easily. As it was I had to wait for my wife to pick up a lever for me and deliver it to the site of the crash. And she brought HER mother with her for company. That was fun.
 

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Oh BTW, since you just bought it....

If you are under 6 feet tall, you will be crying with pain from the pressure on your wrists on long trips. If you are over 6 feet tall, it is your scrunched up knees that will suffer. I suggest working your way up to long mileage days. Set off cold on a 400-miler, and you could come back permanently damaged. Anyway, take some Ibuprofen with you unless you are under 25 and still made of rubber.

There are some bar riser sysems avaialble that make the bike more liveable over long distances, but they all have their problems. For example, the set I have causes my hands to foul the mirrors on very tight low speed turns. Because of the limited range of adjustability due to the nose fairing design and tank shape, any clip-on based solution is going to be only a slight improvement. Some guys have gone to a superbike (tube) style setup and seem to like it.
 

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I am very hard on my bikes. I have over 15000 on 2002 750ss and every mile has been pretty much been on the edge and I have'nt had anything, not dealer related, happen to it to make me stranded. I really have put it to the test let me tell ya. The farthest I have gone, not on the interstate, is from Cynthiana, Ky to Birmingham, Al. I don't like the interstates cuz they don't have curves and not as fun. Keep the ol eye on the oil for some reason I've had to top mine off after about 1500 miles of ridding. Not much though. They are pretty rock solid you'll like it.
T2
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
YellowDuck said:
Oh BTW, since you just bought it....

If you are under 6 feet tall, you will be crying with pain from the pressure on your wrists on long trips. If you are over 6 feet tall, it is your scrunched up knees that will suffer. I suggest working your way up to long mileage days. Set off cold on a 400-miler, and you could come back permanently damaged. Anyway, take some Ibuprofen with you unless you are under 25 and still made of rubber.
That’s interesting that you point that out about the wrists. I’m 6 ft. 3 and it’s my wrists that are throbbing. Does that go away with time? I wonder if I can just get some softer grips.

This is good to hear. I got stranded on my old 700 Intruder, 200 miles north of San Francisco coming from Seattle. That was not fun. I’ve been riding a little the past few days but I haven’t really had the opportunity to really try it out. It won’t stop raining in this damn city.
 

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I have to wonder about the wrists thing... I have just under 40 000 km on my 01 900SS and a fair bit on long trips. I'm 5' 11 and 11 stone. Bike fis like a glove and I rarely feel weight on my wrists.. I should because they are really narrow.. but I tend to lean and take the weight on my torso and thighs... I also ride with my toes on the pegs not my instep. IF anyone was to have a drama on their wrists I tought it would be me. My elbows are nearly always loose, sometimes I'll site pretty much bolt upright and just grip the throttle between thumb and forefinger.

Another tip is get a tank bag and use it to lean on when doing longer trips

Mal
 

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FWIW, my '96 & 97 SS were the most comfortable bikes I've ever owned. At 5'10, I've ridden the two bikes over 70K mi. including many weekend jaunts throughout New England and several times from CT to CO and WY. Even with 600-700 mi. days they were incredible comfortable. As I recall the PT designed SS had a more radical reach to the bars. True?

bruce19
 

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Yeah, the ergos on the post '98 bikes are much less forgiving. Much more arse-up, head-down. The 2000 and later are better than the '99, since they added a 1-cm spacer under the bars to raise them up.

Tron, your wrists will feel better once you adopt a riding style that takes some pressure off of them, as mals900ss mentions. Avoid slow traffic - once you get up to speed, the wind on your torso takes a lot of pressure off the hands. Scoot up to the front of the tank so your belly rests on the tank a bit, and keep your elbows bent and loose as mentioned. Put it in neutral at stop lights so you can sit up and rest your hands.

Most important thing: don't white-knuckle it. Excessively strong grip is the major reason that people's wrists get tired. If you are more relaxed on the bike you can go further. Pay conscious attention to this as you are riding, and you will eventually make a looser grip a habit.

Gel grips might help, but I have them and must say I didn't find much of a difference. Others' experiences will be different no doubt.
 

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If you keep the bike in good working order and do maintenance as required, the 2V duc's are bulletproof.

I've done some 1000+ mile days and one 1500+ mile days. The only issue I had was topping off the oil a bit. That's it.

Bring some spares, decent tool kit, emergency kit, cell phone, etc., and enjoy!
 
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get a throttle clip or similar (throttlemeister, etc.) - it goes easy on your wrist on long trips!
 

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Sore wrist or hands

Most sportbike riding schools will tell you that you need to keep your elbowsw bent and only grip the bars loosley, enough for control but not too much. If you straight arm or grip too tightly in some situations you can create a tank slapper situation, your body will transmit energy from the rear of the bike to the front through your arms. Think of it like a jockey riding a race horse, most weight is carried in the stirrups on the balls of your feet with your knees psuhed in. If it's not easy to hold the posture you need to do some exercises. It takes a lot more physical ability than riding a cruiser a long distance. I'm 47 and a 500 mile day requires advil the next day or so to get the kinks out.
 
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