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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys, wonder if anyone can offer some advice here,

I've recently purchased a low km 2003 998 to keep my 2000 900 SS company in the shed on these cold winter nights (southern hemisphere.......). The 998 comes with a new lithium battery, and a C-Tek lead acid smart battery/trickle charger. The previous owner has said he left the charger connected to the lithium battery on trickle charge all the time.
My query/question is, is it safe/advisable to use a lead acid charger on a lithium battery ???
My (limited) understanding is that, the lithium battery is lighter than a lead acid battery, and has an output voltage in the range of approx 14v, and the lead acid charger has a charging voltage of less than 13v, and so the battery may not reach full charge....but I'm not expert....
Has anyone got anything to offer......besides that, i can't wait to detail the beast, get it registered and blue slipped, as it was bought from interstate, and then get my backside upon it, and (slowly) twist the right hand grip.....
Thanks for you thoughts.
Cheers.
 

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I have 4 bikes with lithium batteries and never use a charger, they will hold a charge at least 6 months.
There is no need to keep a maintainance charger on them.

If first start is sluggish, turn the headlight on for 30 seconds or so and then try again, loading the LiPo's wakes them up.

A smart charger is not good for them especially if has an anti sulfation mode.

Sitting voltage on a LiPo is around 13.1v - 13.2v and ideal charge voltage is 14.4v

davy
 

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I used a regular everyday small battery tender to initially charge my Shorai just left it on for an hour or so then started the bike up to finish the charge.

It hasn't been a cause for concern. Bike has sat for months and never an issue starting, The cost of the shorai charger would go towards a new battery, seems like a waste of money for a non existant problem to buy a special charger.
 

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I think the risk is that the L/A tender would not realize the battery is charged and attempt to overcharge it. If you find you need a charger to handle the discharge of your immobilizer circuit, you would be better off with a lithium management system. Also, lithium batteries charge very fast so if it discharged, you are looking at a a relatively much shorter time to recharge it. Instead of not riding, you are riding a 1/2 hour later. I would attempt to go without as the others have mentioned.
 

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A smart charger for lithium batteries would probably extend the life of a battery. However, it's kind of a moot point since you're primarily using a dumb on-board Ducati charger.
 

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I've seen a few Shorais go up in flames due to improper charging (and at least one random failure). I would not risk it.

Davy is right though. They can sit for ages and still maintain a solid charge. I've pulled them out of stock after sitting on the shelf for 2 years and they are still at 95%. Just don't leave em out in the cold during the winter and they'll be fine. That being said if you ever end up with a dead battery you will need something to get it going again...
 

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I've seen a few Shorais go up in flames due to improper charging (and at least one random failure). I would not risk it.

Davy is right though. They can sit for ages and still maintain a solid charge. I've pulled them out of stock after sitting on the shelf for 2 years and they are still at 95%. Just don't leave em out in the cold during the winter and they'll be fine. That being said if you ever end up with a dead battery you will need something to get it going again...
Yeah, lifepo4 batteries have really low standing discharge rates, so they can last in storage for a long time. They can also handle temperatures of around -10C (14F) without issue, but colder than that you may have charging issues.

RE: charging from dead, well, it's always bad to let a cell die, so these fancy lifepo4 batteries have a battery management system (BMS) which cuts off power if it detects undervoltage in the cells, but will still accept a charge. You either need a special charger that can detect this undervoltage cutoff (as most smart chargers will not charge if they don't detect voltage), or a second 12V battery you can hook up in series (then a regular charger will work just fine as it is now detecting a voltage).

In general, you shouldn't need a battery tender almost ever with lifepo4 batteries. The BMS will do the work for you.
 

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If you want to care for a lithium battery use a proper balance charger. DO NOT use a trickle charger which could explode the battery and set your motorcycle on fire. This helps explain why charging is critical (skip to 6:00):
[ame]https://youtu.be/wIbHLacozFo?t=6m7s[/ame]
 

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If you want to care for a lithium battery use a proper balance charger. DO NOT use a trickle charger which could explode the battery and set your motorcycle on fire. This helps explain why charging is critical (skip to 6:00):
https://youtu.be/wIbHLacozFo?t=6m7s
This is a good description of balance charging, but the complete-package motorcycel lifepo4 batteries don't have a balance charge lead, they rely on the BMS to manage current in each cell. Any basic charger that 'trickle' charges rather than pulses, in the appropriate voltage range (13.3-13.9v) will charge a motorcycle lifepo4 battery with a BMS in it correctly.

You'd have to pull the thing apart and wire in a balance charging lead to each cell to use a balance charger, and that's a much worse idea than trusting the BMS :)
 

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Once the battery is fitted to the bike and running the alternator-R/R simply belts a solid charge into the LiPo just as it does with a lead acid one.
My battery in the 748 went in around 2010 so I think that proves a good solid charge is what they like best.

Only time I had an issue was when the led park lights were left on overnight flattening it down to around 8v.
A 10 minute charge with a 10amp charger was all was needed to bring it back to life and start the motor and no problem with it since.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Hi guys,

Thanks for your input, and advice. Think I'll follow what's been said here, and leave the charger disconnected. Not sure how old the battery is, but I believe it's not that old, perhaps a year or so. Should have plenty of life left in it yet....

Thanks again
 
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