Ducati.ms - The Ultimate Ducati Forum banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
144 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I'm kicking around the Idea of installing a lightweight flywheel on the 800SS. The loss of rotational weight has several advantages, Faster acceleration, less engine braking, etc.... But, this bike will not be going to the track (Any track days will be done on the GSXR) what are the Disadvantages of the Lighter Flywheel for a street bike? Is it worth it??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
852 Posts
I say drop one tooth up front and go with the lightest flywheel you can find...
It will rip on the street.
I did that on a 900SS and love it.

The stock power delivery always seemed too "tractor" like and "4-stroke" feeling to me.

Now it is more like a CR250! :)
You need to have great throttle control to keep the wheelies down when you are really getting on it... but if you want that style of riding then it is the thing to do. Oh, and be careful to not highside when the rear spins-up coming out of a turn too. ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
246 Posts
I got my stock flywheel machined down thru BCM and it seemed like a very nice compromise in weight and cost.
While the article pointed out the advantage on the track might be more appreciated/useful, missed downshifts where the rpms skyrocket are not an everyday street riding occurance either. If they ARE a regular occurance, and you do ride it like you stole it on Sundays, (or every day possible), then perhaps you might like a lightened flywheel on your bike after all, regardless of what the article implies.
During the east coast riding season, I'm out riding with many Duc owners, of all models , who have made this modification and only a few race,(the race prepped bikes really never see the street anyhow).
There does not seem to be a rash of bikes stalling @ traffic signals, or stop signs. There doesn't seem to be a lot of sloppy herky-jerky cruising either. I think we adapt our throttle and clutch technique as needed to control the bike in traffic and launch from a stop.
Just another gallery heard from. YMMV

Gary
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,693 Posts
A light weight flywheel is one of the best bang for the buck mods you can do.
I have easily installed hundreds of them in ducatis and never had a complaint.

The lighter flywheel will have less mass so the power pulses are felt more, a little less smooth. Not so much that it is a problem.

If you go super light the tune of the bike is more crutial ,an out of sync. bike or bike with poor set-up will be more prone to stall. Again not usually a problem.

Do it you will like it:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
102 Posts
Light flywheel in combo with 14T counter sprocket

I put a Nichols flywheel on my 1994 900SS and I found that it did want to stall in traffic a bit more than the stock flywheel. I also changed to a lightened clutch basket and hub at the same time, so my comparison is not pure, although I understand that the lightened clutch will have less impact as it spins more slowly than the crank.

I later put a small counter sprocket on and the bike was transformed. I suggest both changes unless you spend a lot of time over 90 mph - something that I cannot do in heavily patrolled southern Maine.
 

·
Chilehead
Joined
·
6,979 Posts
I've got lightweight (220g) flywheels in my ST2 and SS. For 95% of the riding I do, they work great (riding on very technical back roads with few straight sections, so I'm always either accelerating or decelerating). But they don't work great if running at constant RPM (i.e. commuting), in which case you'd be better off with the OEM flywheel.

Tom
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,334 Posts
My streetbike and racebike both have lightweight flywheels. My SS (streetbike) has the flywheel, crank lightened and lightweight rods and pistons (total 8lbs lighter) and it rides very nice on the road. I do a number of miles on the town streets and the freeway; the bike is very smooth, also with new gearing 14/41.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
454 Posts
I'm kicking around the Idea of installing a lightweight flywheel on the 800SS. The loss of rotational weight has several advantages, Faster acceleration, less engine braking, etc....
I think you can expect more engine braking with the lighter flywheel not less ... less rotating mass allows the engine to spool up and down quicker.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
570 Posts
I got my stock flywheel machined down thru BCM and it seemed like a very nice compromise in weight and cost.
While the article pointed out the advantage on the track might be more appreciated/useful, missed downshifts where the rpms skyrocket are not an everyday street riding occurance either. If they ARE a regular occurance, and you do ride it like you stole it on Sundays, (or every day possible), then perhaps you might like a lightened flywheel on your bike after all, regardless of what the article implies.
During the east coast riding season, I'm out riding with many Duc owners, of all models , who have made this modification and only a few race,(the race prepped bikes really never see the street anyhow).
There does not seem to be a rash of bikes stalling @ traffic signals, or stop signs. There doesn't seem to be a lot of sloppy herky-jerky cruising either. I think we adapt our throttle and clutch technique as needed to control the bike in traffic and launch from a stop.
Just another gallery heard from. YMMV

Gary
My flywheel was lightened at BCM as well. It definately spins up RPM's faster and I have had absolutely no ill effects from this modification.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
144 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Thanks to everyone for their imput. I think i'll do it. It's always nice to hit up the experienced guys before I make any changes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
264 Posts
I've had a lightened flywheel on another SS. My current SS has the stock flywheel and is also a commuter. I like it fine as is. I have no desire to switch it out or lighten it.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
147 Posts
I have been following the answers about flywheels, and i want to ask what are your thoughts on the slingshot flywheel that was put in the classifieds.I did not want to lighten mine in case i do not like the way it performed
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
818 Posts
Oh yeah, you gotta do it. It absolutely transformed my bike. For me, it was an excellent mod, especially for the money.

I went with the Yoyodyne, because I know their work, and because it's slightly heavier than the Nichols, which is the only other one I'd consider. I have experienced absolutely no tractability issues, and have experienced just the opposite as a matter of fact.

I have not heard of anyone having any issues with the Nichols either, so it's entirely up to your personal preference.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top