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Discussion Starter #1
So just recently I've been experiencing some intermittent numbness/tingling in the throttle hand (thumb and forefinger) on my Hyper 950. I've always been able to adjust in terms of certain riding discomforts over the years but this is really annoying. This has never been an issue over the years and I've had some buzzy bike (a few ZX-6Rs, GSXR-750 and SF848). There doesn't seem to be that much vibration coming through the bars but maybe these are micro vibrations that I'm just not feeling it.

I'm looking for some bar end/bar end weights that would help dampen some of the vibration. I've looked at the ones offered by Motovation as well as the hand guard guards by Evotech Performance. Wondering what people's experiences have been w/ vibration and mitigation thereof.


 

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How about filling the bars (partially?) with bbs or shot?
That's just going to cause a vibratory tumbler action in the bars. A solid weight is what you want.

I have Rhinomoto bar ends on my SDR 1290. They're super heavy and work really well but they can only do so much. I thought that they were the bees knees when I first installed them. Ive been riding my hyper for the past 600 miles and man, I went back to the SDR and holy SHIT does that bike vibrate. Good luck with the issue bud! See if Rhonomoto makes something for you. Their products are really well made.
 

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That's just going to cause a vibratory tumbler action in the bars. A solid weight is what you want.
Drive a stopper partway into the bars, add shot, drive another stopper in to sandwich the shot. There’s definitely prior art there.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I think I looked into the Rhinomoto but they require the handguards be removed for the bar ends to work and I really like those handguards.
 

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I think I looked into the Rhinomoto but they require the handguards be removed for the bar ends to work and I really like those handguards.
Bud, are you 100% sure about that? I have bar end mirrors mounted on the OUTSIDE of the handguard because I didn't realize there was clearance inside of the guard on the actual physical bar. I would imagine you might be able to make it work. I test fit the bar ends from my SDR1290 to my Hyper and they seemed to fit fine on the end of the handguard without any issue. At that point, it would probably come down to subjective notion of aesthetic pleasure.

The heavy duty weighted bar ends that I have are SUPER long so there's plenty of meat inside of the bar.
 

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I have the Rhinomoto mirror mounts without their adaptors. I had them send me 70 mm bolts and I used the stock internal adaptors. I used the stock bar end to fill the space in the handguard as the Rhinomoto is too wide to fill it. Very solid connection.
989267
 

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You may love the stock hand guards, but they will shatter on your first tipover. I replaced mine with Cycra Ultra Probends. Ignore the stickers on the carbon screen, they are covering damage from hitting a cyclist who ran a red light.

I have no bar end weights because they made no difference. However, the all metal handguards help stabilize the bar and I have zero issues with vibration. The mirrors stay clear with little to no buzz. There are plenty of pics online for the Cycra kits.

Are you 100% sure your neuropathy is from vibration and not arm position? On the Hyper, I have to focus on dropping my elbows and relaxing my shoulders. The wide bars tend to force elbow lift, which can reduce circulation and/or the forward posture = more death grip. Something to think about.

989280
 

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After watching some Dave Moss Tuning videos, I reclocked my handlebars and levers to better fit me.
 

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I had a revelation on a previous bike - hear me out on this one, it's a completely different direction than bar end weights.

This applies if you get the numbness in your throttle side hand only. I thought I could solve my own issue with very heavy HVMP bar ends but I could not. It is because the problem was less bar vibration, and more of a heavy throttle return spring. The problem is that the throttle return spring makes your throttle hand hold the right grip with much higher force to maintain a throttle position. It puts stress on your median nerves, and that combined with what little vibration is there makes your hand go numb.

There are 3 solutions:

Reduce the return force of your throttle return spring - This can actually happpen by itself as it breaks in, but you can find it on your bike, remove it and pre-stress it. Be careful to not go so far that your throttle doesn't return. The safest way to play with this is to buy a spare throttle spring and mod that.

Use bigger diameter grips - a bigger grip diameter reduces rotational torque requirement on the throttle spring, and also gives you more flat area to rest your palm. Some people have used "Grip Puppies." Those work incredibly well, but I did not like them because they were too big. Felt like I could not get fingers all the way around and therefore less in control. Instead I look for grips with slightly larger diameter. Just a little bit helps.

Throttle locker for long trips - Throttlemeister or something so you can give your right hand a rest now and then. Some people may not like this idea as it could be a safety issue. Hit a pothole and your hands come off the bars but the throttle stays on... well that could be a problem. Use at your own risk.

Personally I started with the throttle locker and thought that solved my numbness issue, but then I solved the core problem of a heavy throttle return spring, and from then on I did not have to rely on the throttle locker as much.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
All very good suggestion...thank you guys...I honestly taped my right wrist the last 2 rides and have been paying close attention to my body position. I would say much improved. Again this is weird because I have over 5k on the bike and never had issues last season on it. I guess I will keep a close eye on it.

In regards to different hand guards, I would say I like the OEM look and turn signal functionality. I do love the aftermarket ones like the ones gamingthemarket suggested. They have a nice hooligan vibe.
 

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I agree it makes a lot of difference to set your bars and levers up to reduce wrist flexing.
This is the most important thing you can do.
Check your gloves when gripping the controls. If they are too tight it can really reduce circulation. This made a big difference for me.
There is a bar insert called a BarSnake that you install inside the bars to reduce vibration.
Ive tried various bar weights with no real improvement.
Ive tried alloy bars vs steel with no real improvement.
 
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Fella's.

Any links to some of the videos regarding setting up your controls? Curious to see more of these as I'm not sure I fully understand some of the concepts that Dave talks about.
 

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I’ve never seen a video on setting up controls properly. Did you try YouTube ?
Common sense should take over here. Loosen your bars and controls just enough to be able to move them. Sit on the bike and move the bars up and down to find the most comfortable position, usually the straightest you can get your wrists. Go lock to lock to verify that your hands on the controls don’t contact the tank. Lock down the bars.
Move the controls, clutch and brake levers to their most comfortable position.
Lock everything down and take it for a ride.
 

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Numb fingers when riding a motorcycle is a common problem. When you apply engine vibration and pressure to the nerves in your hand, your hand falls asleep. The amount of weight on your hands, vibration and frequency is different for different motorcycles and at different speeds so some riders have a problem and some don’t.

If you ride a sportbike the problem is compounded by a riding position that puts more weight on your hands. The more weight you put on the grips the better the transfer of the engine vibration to your hands. (You can get the feeling back by momentarily tapping your fingertips hard against your thigh).

Keep in mind that adding weight to the handlebars does not dampen out vibration — it only changes the vibration resonance frequency. In general, adding weight lowers the frequency, and may lower the amplitude somewhat — and for some riders, this may help to reduce numbness. More weight, more frequency shift — not more damping.

The way to reduce the strength/amplitude of the vibration (and its effects on your hand) is to dampen and isolate it. This is achieved by putting dampening material between the frame vibrations and the rider's hand.

One way is to use carbon fiber handlebars that resonate differently than steel or aluminum.

A better way is to use thicker foam grips instead of hard rubber. The softer and thicker the better.

A third way is to use gloves with padded palms. It's very important that your gloves fit properly so that the fingertips don't receive vibrations from the glove finger ends (they need to be long enough).

 

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Grips that are large enough for your hands can help too. Material and design can make a difference. Diameter can make a difference. I really like “Vans Cult” waffle grips. They are a pain to install but your hands will not slip on them and they dampen vibration well.
Amazon, about $10
 
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