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Hey guys, hoping one of you in the Know? may be able to help me. I'm replacing my stock rear turn signals with some LED ones. I've tried two brands of resistors/load equalizers & my flash rate is still very fast. What other way is there to sort this out. I believe my year model (2011 Evo 1100) does not have a flasher relay & the flash rate is controlled by the dash. Also there does not seem to be a LED set option in the dash menu as with the previous generation hypers...any help will be greatly appreciated...this is starting to drive me crazy, thanks Rob
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
C'mon guys... nobody converted to LED rear signals & had this issue???
 

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I tried the same thing and in the end I used Weiser Ultra Bright Blinker LED inserts from Adventure Designs that fit inside your signal housing replacing the bulb and reflector plate. Flashing rate just a tiny bit faster than with light bulbs. Good luck!
 

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Interestingly, (or not..) I have been going through this with my 2010 796, replacing OEM front LEDs with aftermarket ones. Having forgotten all the previous research I did, I innocently assumed they would work straight away but they flashed like crazy at around 160fpm - pretty hard to count...

If I U C, as the Hyper has no flasher relay, the ECU expects the new LEDs to have the same high resistance as the OEM, which are designed to mimic bulbs (to match the bulbs on the rear). The system wants either bulbs or LEDs not both, hence the high resistance OEM front LEDs. (haven't looked into how programmable this is via the 796 dash - maybe different to 1100?) Another thread suggests the OEM LEDs are 5w without mentioning their resistance. Most signal bulbs are actually 10w (& maybe 5ohm resistance?)

Anyway, first I fitted some 22ohm 10w wirewound ceramic resistors I had, across the new lamp wires (parallel) but this didn't slow the flash rate, then I jumped up to 1kohm 10w (what the shop had) which just about reduced the flash rate to around 120fpm (the max speed allowed for UK MOT) I never thought about the duration of each flash "lamp-on time" - mine seem pretty quick. My feeling is that I could slow the flash rate further if I fitted say 2kohm resistors? Which seems an awful lot higher than the 10ohm suggested in the "sticky / permalink "LED signal resistors (actually says 10ohm fitted to one lamp per side being sufficient for both front & rear - but I'm not sure if this applies to the canbus system on a Hyper.)
Would fitting 10ohm actually work better than 1kohm in my case?
 

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Interestingly, (or not..) I have been going through this with my 2010 796, replacing OEM front LEDs with aftermarket ones. Having forgotten all the previous research I did, I innocently assumed they would work straight away but they flashed like crazy at around 160fpm - pretty hard to count...

If I U C, as the Hyper has no flasher relay, the ECU expects the new LEDs to have the same high resistance as the OEM, which are designed to mimic bulbs (to match the bulbs on the rear). The system wants either bulbs or LEDs not both, hence the high resistance OEM front LEDs. (haven't looked into how programmable this is via the 796 dash - maybe different to 1100?) Another thread suggests the OEM LEDs are 5w without mentioning their resistance. Most signal bulbs are actually 10w (& maybe 5ohm resistance?)
On my 08 HyperS I have all LEDS, The "hidden Menu" has to be set for "LAMP" not "LED" and I needed use the resistors supplied by Rizoma (10ohm). The "hidden Menu" Set for "LED" would not work for me, and the resistors needed to be in the rear. I could get it to blink properly using "LED" but the Signal Indicator lamp on the dash would not work.

It was a strange project.
t_bare
 

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The plot thickens!
Interesting your set up worked with the resistors at the rear rather than front but his makes sense if you have the OEM fronts.
My dash don't flash either. Mind you I've got used to this since the last set of standard bulbs I replaced in the rear (before the new front LEDs) must have a different resistance to the previous ones. Although they flash they're not very bright & the dash stopped flashing. hmmmm. In fact I struggled to find any local stockist who had those small bulbs. Will probably fit LEDs in the back later this year too. Seems the dash/ECU is pretty fussy about lamps, It likes to see a nice balanced resistance between them all...?

My LED's are just some cheap imports, they came without any (separate) resistors. You can calculate the resistor but only if you know the specs for each individual LED in the array & how many of them there are. All impossible in a sealed lamp unit that might even have a built in resistor of unknown spec. We only have educated guessing. (Or barely educated in my case...) At least Rizoma supply some with their lamps.

I may try some 10ohm just to see but only when I can face up to farkling about with all that spaghetti again.
It's all grist to the mill.
 

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The plot thickens!

Interesting your set up worked with the resistors at the rear rather than front but his makes sense if you have the OEM fronts.

My dash don't flash either. Mind you I've got used to this since the last set of standard bulbs I replaced in the rear (before the new front LEDs) must have a different resistance to the previous ones. Although they flash they're not very bright & the dash stopped flashing. hmmmm. In fact I struggled to find any local stockist who had those small bulbs. Will probably fit LEDs in the back later this year too. Seems the dash/ECU is pretty fussy about lamps, It likes to see a nice balanced resistance between them all...?

My LED's are just some cheap imports, they came without any (separate) resistors. You can calculate the resistor but only if you know the specs for each individual LED in the array & how many of them there are. All impossible in a sealed lamp unit that might even have a built in resistor of unknown spec. We only have educated guessing. (Or barely educated in my case...) At least Rizoma supply some with their lamps.

I may try some 10ohm just to see but only when I can face up to farkling about with all that spaghetti again.

It's all grist to the mill.
You can't directly measure impedance of an LED (array) as LEDs are diodes and have infinite resistance until forward voltage is applied. It's not really possible to measure impedance when voltage is applied to the circuit, so you have to do the math. If you get the operating voltage / forward voltage of the array, using a variable DC power supply you can measure the voltage and current. Then it's just Ohms law, V=I*R.

The cheapo LEDs are probably causing a larger than spec voltage drop across the array that is causing the problems with the IC-controlled blinker oscillator and LED dash lamp. Or the forward voltage required for your array exceeds the maximum output of the circuit. Since it sounds like the dash has an option for LED dedicated operation, it may only drive that circuit at 5v or less in such a mode.

Geoff
 

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Thanks Geoff, your input appreciated.
Just looked at the OEM lamps; they have 15 square white backed, clear faced Leds (not quite like the yellow face "c.o.b" ones I see a lot of these days in domestic lighting) the lamp has 3.11w embossed on the back. So a 7w resistor would be ok? 10w is more than adequate.
We have no info on what the dash/ecu parameters are for the LED setting; maybe it's as you say, about 5v or so. Also our bikes have std bulbs at the rear to confuse matters, or people fit different types of LEDs to front & rear (let alone cheapo's like mine) which maybe doesn't help dash-wise?
I don't know why Duc didn't just fit LEDs all round & be done with it!
 

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The wattage of the resistor is its thermal capacity at nominal impedance. You need to figure 20% overhead, depending on material, for the resistor to maintain its specifications without overheating. 10W is all that is necessary.

If I were in your shoes, I'd switch the dash to LAMP and add in the 10W 10Ohm resistors as described in the other thread and put 12V LED assemblies at each four corners and see what the results are.

Geoff
 
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