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Discussion Starter #1
Hi guys,
3000km in and loving this bike, it just gets better and better.
I'm having a lot of fun pinning 2nd gear (sometimes opening, closing then opening the throttle) to get the front to lift up. I use DWC 1 and feel pretty safe.
Slowly building up the courage to try clutch wheelies - so my question is whats the multi like to try this on?? Those 2nd gear power wheelies are just so fun (especially beatings TDM's etc while kicking up the front haha)
Is the general advice not to learn on this bike as I might flip it or go for it keeping with wheelie control etc
Cheers
 

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Power wheelies are fun at first but they lift slowly initially then rise faster thereafter.
Do try to learn to "clutch it up" as the muscle memory will control the height of the initial lift.
 

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Hi guys,
3000km in and loving this bike, it just gets better and better.
I'm having a lot of fun pinning 2nd gear (sometimes opening, closing then opening the throttle) to get the front to lift up. I use DWC 1 and feel pretty safe.
Slowly building up the courage to try clutch wheelies - so my question is whats the multi like to try this on?? Those 2nd gear power wheelies are just so fun (especially beatings TDM's etc while kicking up the front haha)
Is the general advice not to learn on this bike as I might flip it or go for it keeping with wheelie control etc
Cheers
Learn how to keep your right foot at the ready floating above the rear brake pedal. Use that for panic situations. Otherwise, use the clutch lever to control front wheel height.

FULL DISCLOSURE: I do not condone doing wheelies on public roads. Same with speeding or violating any other vehicle codes (laws). I also do not condone new riders doing wheelies. That comes with a very high risk of injury or even death, tearing up the bike, injuring others, causing traffic accidents, and just generally making all motorcycle riders look like assholes. Everyone is free to do as they please .... but discretion is paramount when it comes to riding a motorcycle on one wheel. If a person is set on learning how to do wheelies, start out on a dirt bike ... in the dirt ... where lousy judgement won't be affecting other vehicle operators or pedestrians. Wheelies are very tricky ... hundreds ... actually thousands of practice runs are required to get them right. Throttle control, clutch control, rear brake control, weight shifting to control left/right lean and turning the front wheel one direction or the other to correct the wheelie when the bike wants to turn with the front wheel in the air, and eventually shifting up into higher gears while doing wheelies takes tons of practice.

Fully expect to eat shit ... more than once ... when goofing around with this stuff.

Two examples, both shifting up into 4th gear at speed ... one on the dirt, one on a public road in a residential area ... you get one guess on which one is best!

977223
977224
 

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What @ Rex Coil 7 wrote plus don't just put your foot on the rear brake. Use it to bring it down without chopping the throttle. Get that muscle memory instinct.
 

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What @ Rex Coil 7 wrote plus don't just put your foot on the rear brake. Use it to bring it down without chopping the throttle.
+1 ... I corrected the statement in my post ....

"Learn how to keep your right foot at the ready floating above the rear brake pedal"

Instead of "Learn how to keep your right foot at the ready on the rear brake pedal "
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Ok conclusion so far seems to be, learn to clutch up, keep right foot hoving rear brake and expect to crash my multi?? :cry:
 

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Ok conclusion so far seems to be, learn to clutch up, keep right foot hoving rear brake and expect to crash my multi?? :cry:
Depends on how over-confident you get. Some people do ... others do not. But anytime you try to make your motorcycle into a unicycle you should expect a learning curve. Some riders have never looped their bike when doing wheelies ... yet others have torn up a lot of equipment and ass cheeks.

Baby steps ... like with any other situation .. even when learning how to "drag a knee" when cornering. It all comes with risks.
 

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Ok conclusion so far seems to be, learn to clutch up, keep right foot hoving rear brake and expect to crash my multi?? :cry:
If I were you... I'd buy a cheap dirtbike and practice on that (if you're out of town), they can handle drops a lot better than road bikes. If you're in town then an inexpensive lightweight road bike.

I think of it this way... one drop could easily cost more than the practice bike, and you're HIGHLY likely to drop the bike at least once. And assuming you don't totally trash the practice bike you'll be able to make most of what you spent back when you sell it.
 

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What the guys wrote is all true. Ducati twins are amazing wheelie monsters.
On that note, I bought a Monster exclusively because of that big "W" on a demo ride...totally unexpected but I was sold.
Ps: Not Dubya, he had nothing to do with it.
 

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Make sure the back brake works first.
Because, you know, Italian bikes and back brakes. :ROFLMAO:
One that note, I just bought a Mityvac brake fluid pump and a caliper spreader tool to facilitate bleeding and cleaning. Both are relatively inexpensive.
 

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I've lifted the front of my '13 quite a few times when launching hard. Although never intentionally.

IMO, lifting the front wheel high on such a heavy bike does nothing but shorten the life of the front forks. Wheelies are for light bikes.
 

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It's your money, if you want to do wheelies on a touring bike, go for it. Beyond what has already been said, I'll just add that Ducatis in general are not a good choice for riding out long wheelies on balance point. The vert cylinder can't drain oil properly, and the other one can become oil starved. This is true of basically any v-twin, but Ducati in particular since they are a 90 degree V. Absolutely not a problem unless you ride one out for a long time, but it's worth noting.
 

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Hi guys,
3000km in and loving this bike, it just gets better and better.
I'm having a lot of fun pinning 2nd gear (sometimes opening, closing then opening the throttle) to get the front to lift up. I use DWC 1 and feel pretty safe.
Slowly building up the courage to try clutch wheelies - so my question is whats the multi like to try this on?? Those 2nd gear power wheelies are just so fun (especially beatings TDM's etc while kicking up the front haha)
Is the general advice not to learn on this bike as I might flip it or go for it keeping with wheelie control etc
Cheers
Just do this... It's the most fun you can have with your clothes on.
977264
977265
 

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Buy a little Supermoto or honda grom. If you learn to wheelie those, the big bikes don't feel as hard. Better yet, learn to wheelie a bicycle first. Don't learn on a nice Multi dude, that's just asking for trouble if you have no previous experience with wheelies... Get dialed in, like really dialed in on one of the smaller bikes as if you want to do a proper wheelie (not chasing balance point gaining speed as you try and find the magic spot.) You might probably Ooof a couple times learning. Better yet, find a friend with a 4 wheeler and learn on that getting forward and rear down and using the rear brake to modulate the front end, then learn side to side on a motorcycle, and then the multi.

That is my personal opinion but I've seen people learning power wheelies wreck their nice ass new bikes by trying to play the chase balance point game, or slam front down when it lifts too high and scares them, so they set the front down angled, and tank slap themselves into a tarmac slide, and it isn't pretty nor cheap.
 

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unless you are already proficient at wheelies i wouldn't be practising on a multi, they're expensive so if you bin it it will cost a lot to fix, but they're also heavy, so even in the period up to when you bin it you're doing damage, to the steering head bearings, clutch etc...
The heavier the bike the more damage ham fisted attempts will do to it.

As others have suggested it would be wise to buy a cheap bike to learn on, power makes it easier to get it up but buying a small dirt bike will get your technique right much quicker, I'm hopeless at them, i had a TE450 Husky that i could wheelie on, thought i was pretty good too, until a mate showed me on his bike, (the same) what it looked like to ride along on the back wheel in 4th gear for what seemed like miles, leaning it around slight bends and all..... BASTARD!

Point is, i learned on a small dirt bike, fell off plenty, dusted myself off and got back on, regardless of how much fun your multi is i doubt you're as committed as you need to be to learn properly, learning on a shitbox means you focus on getting it right, once you have it down on that, the Multi will power up with no effort and you can wheelie it easily and most importantly, put the front wheel down under control saving the bike from most wear and tear.

Also, a small dirt bike is a hoot for just plain old nonsense, no need to stop with wheelies, rolling burnouts, steppes etc, anything is possible on small bikes, you just have to be merciless with the throttle and clutch, and it's a lot more fun than flogging your multi.... the Multi is best for posing on when you have your chops down....
 
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