Ducati.ms - The Ultimate Ducati Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Mr Leakered
Joined
·
8,782 Posts
The interesting mention of turbine applications. I still regret not looking under the oil cap of our V70 T5 before we bought it. Even there, there was evidence of coked up oil. Luckily for us, the only issue that became apparent down the road, other than leaks, was a plugged up breather system. I can only assume that the original owner of the car used conventional oil for those first 40k. After our ownership for the next 100k and synthetic oils, there was no further build up on parts that I could inspect. I would have enjoyed dropping the oil pan, but that would have required dropping the subframe also.

Yeah, I have an addiction to small displacement, turbo motors. So, it is just easier to keep synthetic on the shelf, esp with a WalMart just up the road.

My guess, given the observed coolant temps of my ST, the motor does not run as hot as car motors, esp HP turbos and very lean mixtures. But, seeing zero evidence of coked up oil was a nice, warm fuzzy when in the past I pulled the vert head and right engine cover.

Now on the Ural, some folks will say to run conventional to speed along the break in process. Myself, I'm happy to let that take as long as it wants to, with synthetic. The bike has a low pressures oil system with splash lubrication, esp to the heads. It is a truly air-cooled bike. I'm not going there with a non-synthetic oil. =)

Have a good one.
 

·
Mr Leakered
Joined
·
8,782 Posts

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
162 Posts
Mediocre article, IMO. One thing that should be discussed ....

Most private piston-engine planes and most motorcycles have (at least) one thing in common: they spend a lot of time sitting in the garage/hanger with sometimes months between starts. In that situation, synthetic oil can be bad news. While dino (mineral) oil forms a rather long-lasting film on bare surfaces, synthetic tends to bead-up or drain off, leaving bare metal exposed. With modest new airplane engines running $50k and rebuilds $25k, non-use rusting has been a big deal in the aviation world for quite some time, hence most owners still use mineral oil.

IMO, ride the bike at least every few days or on a track: synthetic

Ride intermittently or leave it sit over winter: mineral

Compromise: semi-synthetic (aka para-synthetic)

YMMV
 

·
Come in Spinner :)
Joined
·
7,547 Posts
Mediocre article, IMO. One thing that should be discussed ....

Most private piston-engine planes and most motorcycles have (at least) one thing in common: they spend a lot of time sitting in the garage/hanger with sometimes months between starts. In that situation, synthetic oil can be bad news. While dino (mineral) oil forms a rather long-lasting film on bare surfaces, synthetic tends to bead-up or drain off, leaving bare metal exposed. With modest new airplane engines running $50k and rebuilds $25k, non-use rusting has been a big deal in the aviation world for quite some time, hence most owners still use mineral oil.

IMO, ride the bike at least every few days or on a track: synthetic

Ride intermittently or leave it sit over winter: mineral

Compromise: semi-synthetic (aka para-synthetic)

YMMV
I totally disagree with this assertion, synthetic sticks around on surfaces long after mineral has dried off.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top