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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been struggling with the lighting on the ST2 for years. Done the PIAA halogen swap, re-aimed the lamps, etc. The lights were still not only impossible at night but I wasn't sure I was being seen in the daylight either. Can't afford a DD upgrade so I found a set of HID lamps for $150. Wow! These should do just fine. I will pass along particulars regarding which HIDs I used, installation, etc if anyone is interested.
Les
 

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Mr Leakered
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Hellz ya. Post it up.

BTW, this thread is worthless without pics! Hahaha.

Have a good one.
 

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Are you upgrading the lighting wiring harness? I assume those lamps will draw more current. Interested to see your progress.
 

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It was my understanding that the wireing cannot withstand the heat generated, or something similar. Hope I am wrong. I think if you search this topic you will find discussion on this.
 

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Are you upgrading the lighting wiring harness? I assume those lamps will draw more current. Interested to see your progress.
HID's typically run at 35W as compared to the OEM halogen units that are usually 55W units, so they actually draw less power than the OEM equipment. There are 50W HID's around but I have heard that they are having ballast longevity issues......
 

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HID lamps in a Monster S2R-1000

I did a 50watt HID in my bike and have had no problems and can clearly see infront of me now. Two lanes wide and way down the road....you can't miss me in the day and I look like a comet at nite.
 

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HID's typically run at 35W as compared to the OEM halogen units that are usually 55W units, so they actually draw less power than the OEM equipment. There are 50W HID's around but I have heard that they are having ballast longevity issues......
Thanks, I did not know that. By my calculation, 35 watt lamps will draw about 3 amps where 55 watt lamps will draw about 4.6 amps.

Do these things screw right in? :D
I'll have to learn more about HID...
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Correct. HIDs actually draw less current than halogens. I installed a 4200K H3 on the low beam projector and a 6000K H1 on the high beam. I also removed the metal curtain inside the projector lamp.

I tried taking pics of the original halogen lights but they look like someone holding a flashlight in the dark. Don't have any pics of the installation but it was pretty straight forward. I do recommend taking the headlight unit completely off the bike (4 screws - easy) to make the installation easier. I mounted the ballasts on the metal bracket either side near the signal light pods in the upper fairing, and I mounted the igniters on the metal arms that the mirrors mount to. These devices do get a little warm apparently so it is best to mount them where they can get rid of some heat.

The light from these things is awesome. It does take a few seconds for them to power up to full power though which makes the high beam flasher sort of useless but I think that is worth the sacrifice.

I purchased the lights from here http://autoxsport.com/index.html I got the premium kit and he swapped bulbs around to get me the H!/H3 combination.

Another good site on HID is here http://hidreview.com/index.php?option=com_frontpage&Itemid=1

:)
 

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Mr Leakered
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Thanks for posting that up.

One question, how did you get the low beam splitter out? I've tried on two headlights and it seams Duc used as serious amount of red loc-tite on that screw. Also, once off, how did you get it out of the hole?

I've heard that on newer HID kits, the igniters and ballasts are a lot more compact.

Have a good one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
The H1/H3 lamps drop right in. You do need to remove the ground wire from the light housing and attach it to the HID harness. As usual do not touch the actual lamps as that will damage them.
As I said, take the headlight right off the bike to work on this and save yourself alot of grief. Two screws top/two bottom & the parking lamp is a rubber press fit so just carefully pull it out.
The HID wiring harness is all weather proof connections and is labelled. Double check that you know which wires are pos & neg on the bike and the HID kit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Tonered, on the cutoff plate I just used a new phillips screwdriver and was very careful not to round the screw off. I extracted the metal plate with a mechanics magnet. It helps to have the headlight unit on the bench where you can work on it properly.
 

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Les,
I see 4300k OEM on the H3 bulb selector...I suppose that's right?

So the thing to do is call and say you want one bulb one type and the other, instead of a matched pair.

Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
You got it. The guy I talked to was Tony ...... he'll probably remember if you told him the application. Make sure you get the slim ballast with the 2 year warranty.
 

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Mr Leakered
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Tonered, on the cutoff plate I just used a new phillips screwdriver and was very careful not to round the screw off. I extracted the metal plate with a mechanics magnet. It helps to have the headlight unit on the bench where you can work on it properly.
It comes out without cutting? Excellent.

Both times, I've had the light braced between my legs on a creeper with a gripping bit and a lot of downforce, but no luck. I could feel it start to round. Bummer.

I have found with the right setting, the cutoff is liveable. I have the light aimed such that at a typical following distance (2sec or so), the h-cutoff is level with the top of most car trunks. This setting seems to give enough visibility in curves.

Thanks for all the info.

Have a good one.
 

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I installed HIDS on my ST4s a few months ago and it is the difference between night and day. (Cliche but true)

As I understand it, HIDS draw more current on startup but then drop to less current than OEM. The instructions advise not starting the bike if the headlamps are switched on. I've followed that advice mostly. No problems so far.

The seller in the UK was www.hids4u.co.uk The lamps came well packaged with comprehensive instructions.

It took some thought to finds a place to mount the ballasts -- not much space under the ST fairing.
 

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My understanding is that using a HID lamp in a non-HID housing is illegal. The reason mostly being that the reflector needs to be shaped differently to dispense the light, otherwise it's blinding to look at. Maybe Paul Geller will chime in, he's the resident lighting expert.

On a related note some guys may be running high beams during the day or maybe they installed the HID bulbs in a conventional system, not sure but it is blinding when they approach. It's a bad idea, I have to look away from them so I don't have spots in my eyes for the next 30 seconds. If the idea is to be seen, it's defeated when you force people to avoid looking your way.
 

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Mr Leakered
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My eventual approach would be to use a low color temp, like 4500K. From what I understand, mounting a HID behind a projector lens like that on our low beam side is more or less legal from the design-side considerations as it closely resembles an OEM application. This is because that type of lens can control the scatter better than a reflector. Just think of the differences between the various OEM halogen headlamps, specifically those on Dodge vans and Stratuses from a couple models ago (sim to our Ducs) and just about any Ford headlamp (generally huge, but well designed, IMHO). The only probelm is the HIDs location relative to the lens. It may not be ideal. My guess is that it would be better then OEM, and probably not to bad for oncoming folks considering the low color temp.

You are correct from the reflector standpoint. For both of these, it is mainly due to the need for the horizontal cutoff and glare. Halogen reflectors tend to flood the area ahead where OEM reflector HIDs are rare and tend to focus the light forward with a controlled spread. On a group ride a while ago, I was riding ahead of a squid on an R6 that converted both lamps to HIDs (a squid because of the lack of gear and his flat-footing it in the corners and flooring it on the straights). Seeing him in my mirrors in daylight hurt. I want to avoid that.

My high beam seems to do a good enough job. Once the lowbeam HID is in, I'll be able to refocus the hi for even better viewing.

Have a good one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Very happy with my decision to go with HIDs. The low-beam projector is a tight enough beam that it does not blind on-coming traffic but is definitely more visible than the old lamp. I would say the glare is far less than that from riders who ride with the high-beams on in the daytime.

As Tonered said, the HID is more suited to projector style lamps like we have in the ST2/ST4....... not so much for the open reflector type headlights.
 

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OK, just read the "documentation" coming with the HID kit. It says disable lights so you can start up the bike first, without lights, then switch lamps on, because the HIDs draw a lot in the first few moments. How have you guys done this? Needed?

Also says a 20 amp fuse upgrade is required...not at bike now, but looking at ST4 schematic I see 5/7.7/20 and 40 amp fuse. The 20 is in the head-lighting circuit so I guess good to go in that respect.
 
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