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Hi! So i noticed with most ducati engines if im not mistaken on 1st gear it gets really jerky when you are at low speeds especially when cruising at traffic where i can only go from 5-10 kph. So the solution i do is i usually ride the clutch which makes it smoother, but i obviously do not want to burn the clutch( if it does burn it?). Is it true that if i change the sprocket size of my bike it would help a lot? Thanks. Currently own a 950s
 

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Multi's have wet clutch... you can ride the clutch with the engine at idle nearly forever and not hurt anything. Duc's are geared high... if I just let the clutch out in first with no throttle my bike will (IIRC) run at about 7mph (12kph or so). If you want to ride slower than that then feather the clutch.
 

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I had a monster 821 for many years and now a Multistrada 1260...this has always been an issue with their V-twin engines. I feathered the clutch routinely and never had a problem nor did I wear it out 25k miles on the 821. This issue also arises on down hill slopes with hairpin turns at say 10 to 20 mph where your caught between 1st and 2nd gear. Using the clutch solves the problem....

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Multi's have wet clutch... you can ride the clutch with the engine at idle nearly forever and not hurt anything. Duc's are geared high... if I just let the clutch out in first with no throttle my bike will (IIRC) run at about 7mph (12kph or so). If you want to ride slower than that then feather the clutch.
Thanks for the input, Dave. The bikes are such a beast on open road, just don’t let them sit on traffic lol.
 

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Thanks for the input, Dave. The bikes are such a beast on open road, just don’t let them sit on traffic lol.
Yea as much as I love this bike for virtually all types of riding... I'd not use it for an urban commuter... too hot in slow traffic and geared too high.

Key to safely feathering the clutch is to keep engine rev's at or near idle... easy to practice in a parking lot if you've not done it before. In an empty level lot practice letting out the clutch without touching the throttle, then just let the bike idle along for a bit still without touching the throttle and get the feel for that... then start using the clutch (and possibly some very light braking) to reduce the speed of the bike below what it wants to run at without reducing the engine idle speed. Doesn't really take long to get a good feel for it.

If that causes you to stall frequently then take a step further back and do the clutch rocking exercise... to do that you start on a level surface fully stopped with both feet down. Again without touching the throttle you let out the clutch until you feel it start to grab and pull the bike forward a bit. With your feet push the bike back then use the clutch to lightly pull the bike back forward. Do this for 5 or 10 minutes to get a feel for where and how the clutch starts to engage and how quickly it engages.

Both of these I learned at the MSF Safety class... which I think is a fantastic class for folks who want to learn more about basic safe handling of a motorcycle. I took it when I got back into riding after many years and learned quite a bit.
 
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